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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury (1214-1439)
Christopher Wordsworth, Master of the Hospital of St Nicholas in Salisbury, Wiltshire, published an edition of the 15th-century cartulary of that foundation in 1902. While transcribing the text, he interspersed it with notes and lists from his own researches so as to provide a general history of the hospital, and some of the material dates from much later than 1500, and relates to those institutions which he regarded as daughter institutions or offshoots of the hospital. There are later additions to the cartulary through to 1639, and records of the Chapel of St John Baptist on the Isle, the Scotist College of St Nicholas de Vaux (Valle Scholarium), and the collegiate church of St Edmund, Salisbury. There is also a calendar of records belonging to the hospital. The cartulary itself is a quarto codex of 80 leaves, copying charters of bequests to the hospital, and in these the main persons to appear are the benefactors, the witnesses, and occasionally the names of tenants, occupiers of adjoining tenements, and members of the hospital clergy. The cartulary is in six geographical sections: I, Box, Wyvelesford and Manningford Bohun; II, Broad Hinton; III, Fyssherton (Fisherton Aucher or Anger); IV, East and West Harnham; V, Salisbury; and VI, Gerardeston (Gurston in Broadchalke).
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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of the Hospital of St Nicholas, Salisbury
 (1214-1439)
Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire (1440-1441)
The Duchess of Norfolk allowed T. Walter Hall to examine the early archives of her Sheffield estates, and in 1926 he published a volume including abstracts (in translation) of the Sheffield manor court roll from October 1440 to September 1441. In this roll was also the Sheriff's tourn 18 April 1441 of the superior jurisdiction of Hallamshire, covering the sokes of Sheffield, Hannesworth, Bradfield, Southawe and Ecclesfield; and this is also printed. Hall found fragments of a Bradfield court roll of 1385; and devoted the latter half of his book to extracts from the Register of Copyholders' Surrenders, showing surrenders and admittances of copyhold tenants of the manor of Sheffield from 1403 to 1634; plus some miscellaneous deeds and documents relating to the manor and to Hallamshire. The index covers all these.
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Inhabitants of Sheffield in Yorkshire
 (1440-1441)
Close Rolls (1441-1447)
The close rolls of the 20th to 25th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.
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Close Rolls
 (1441-1447)
Close Rolls (1447-1454)
The close rolls of the 26th to 32nd years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.
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Close Rolls
 (1447-1454)
Oxfordshire Charters (1450-1459)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Oxfordshire Charters
 (1450-1459)
Yorkshire Testators and Legatees (1426-1466)
Wills and testaments from the diocese of York (Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Hexhamshire, Lancashire north of the Ribble, and southwest Westmorland) registered at York. Richmond and Southwell archdeaconries had their own lower probate jurisdictions, so the wills registered at York are predominantly from the East and West Ridings and the eastern part of the North Riding of Yorkshire. In theory, wills dealt with real property and testaments with personal property, but the distinction hardly applies in practice: most of these wills are in Latin, but some are in English. Being before the Reformation, they commonly start with benefactions to churches, chantries, chapels, &c., and with provisions for the burning of candles ('lights') and saying of masses.
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Yorkshire Testators and Legatees
 (1426-1466)
Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of Ripon, Yorkshire (1178-1474)
The Ingilby Manuscript, containing part of a chapter act book, and a considerable fragment of a 14th-century cartulary, bound together some valuable early records surviving from the mediaeval collegiate church of St Peter and St Wilfrid at Ripon in the West Riding of Yorkshire. The manuscript was edited by Canon J. T. Fowler and published by the Surtees Society in 1908. The church had the patronage of many local advowsons, and the act book includes presentations and institutions to these, as well as other matters of internal administration. The cartulary is a compilation of copies of deeds by which local benefactors granted land to the college: most of the earlier ones are undated. The names that appear are those of the donors, of occasional tenants or occupiers of adjoining land, and also the witnesses to the charters. Most of the land granted was in the immediate vicinity of Ripon.
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Clerks, clergy, benefactors and tenants of Ripon, Yorkshire
 (1178-1474)
Freemen of Dublin (1478)
The franchise rolls of the city of Dublin record the admissions of new freemen, by special grace, having served apprenticeship, or as child or son-in-law of a freeman, each fourth Friday after Easter, Midsummer, Michaelmas and Christmas each year.
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Freemen of Dublin
 (1478)
Oxfordshire Charters (1470-1479)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.
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Oxfordshire Charters
 (1470-1479)
Dublin diocese testators and legatees (1457-1483)
This register of testaments or wills and inventories from the diocese of Dublin in the time of archbishops Tregury and Walton (now in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin) was printed with a translation by the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland in 1896-7. The inventory usually comes first, and often includes names of debtors and creditors to the testator. The diocese of Dublin did not extend far into the Pale; but the province of Dublin, over which the archbishops had prerogative probate jurisdiction, included the southern half of Ireland, but virtually all these wills are from the city of Dublin or close at hand.
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Dublin diocese testators and legatees
 (1457-1483)
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