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Patentees of New Inventions (1860)
Abstracts of British patents for new inventions applied for and granted from 1 January to 31 December 1860: giving date, name and address, and short description of the invention. It is then stated whether 'Letters patent sealed' or 'Provisional protection only'.
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Patentees of New Inventions
 (1860)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Imperieuse (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged in 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Taku Forts 1860 clasp, for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and the Pekin clasp, for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860.
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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Imperieuse
 (1860)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Magicienne (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged in 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Taku Forts 1860 clasp, for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860.
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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Magicienne
 (1860)
Supporters of the Madras Civil Orphan Asylum (1860)
The list of donors and subscribers to the Madras Civil Orphan Asylum, up to 30 June 1860, gives surnames and initials: whether the sum was subscribed annually (anly.) or monthly (mly.) or consisted of donation(s) (don.), in rupees, annas and pies.
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Supporters of the Madras Civil Orphan Asylum
 (1860)
British officers and civil servants in India dying or retiring (1861)
The Indian Army and Civil Service List for July 1861 was printed by order of the Secretary of State for India in Council. Each issue recorded the names of those officers and officials lost by death or resignation in the year previous.
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British officers and civil servants in India dying or retiring
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Boston (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Boston
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Bridge (Kent) (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Bridge (Kent)
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Brighton (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Brighton
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Chelsea, St Luke (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Chelsea, St Luke
 (1861)
Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Eastbourne (1861)
This comprehensive return by the Poor Law Board for England and Wales in July 1861 revealed that of the 67,800 paupers aged 16 or over, exclusive of vagrants, then in the Board's workhouses, 14,216 (6,569 men, 7,647 women) had been inmates for a continuous period of five years and upwards. The return lists all these long-stay inmates from each of the 626 workhouses that had been existence for five years and more, giving full name; the amount of time that each had been in the workhouse (years and months); the reason assigned why the pauper in each case was unable to sustain himself or herself; and whether or not the pauper had been brought up in a district or workhouse school (very few had). The commonest reasons given for this long stay in the workhouse were: old age and infirm (3,331); infirm (2,565); idiot (1,565); weak mind (1,026); imbecile (997); and illness (493).
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Long-stay Paupers in Workhouses: Eastbourne
 (1861)
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