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Bankrupts' Assignees (1841)
Assignees of bankrupts' estates (usually principal creditors and/or close relatives of the bankrupt) in England and Wales
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Bankrupts' Assignees
 (1841)
Boys entering Cheltenham College (1841)
Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).
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Boys entering Cheltenham College 
 (1841)
British Army administration (1841)
The British Army of queen Victoria's time had a very extensive system of administration. The Royal Kalendar lists officials, both uniformed and civilian, from the Commander-in-Chief's Office at Horse Guards, the Adjutant-General's Office, the Recruiting Department, the Quarter Master-General's Office, the Judge Advocate-General's Office, the Consolidated Board of General Officers, the Cinque Ports, the War Office, the Office of her Majesty's Paymaster-General, the Ordnance Department (including the out-ports and stations at Woolwich, Chatham, Dover, Portsmouth, Devonport, Guernsey, Jersey, Chester and Liverpool, Carlisle, Hull, Landguard Fort and Harwich, Alderne, the gunpowder manufactory at Waltham Abbey, the gunpowder magazines at Hyde Park, Purfleet, Gravesend and Tilbury, Upnor Castle, Priddy's Hard, Tipner Point, Keyham Point, Marchwood and Tynemouth; at Edinburgh, Stirling Castle and Fort George in Scotland; in Antigua, Australia, the Bahamas, Barbadoes, Berbice, Bermuda, Cape of Good Hope, Colombo, Corfu, Demerara, Dominica, Gibraltar, Grenada, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Jamaica, Isle aux Nois, Kingston (Upper Canada), Malta, Mauritius, Montreal, New Brunswick, Prince Edward's Island, Quebec, Rideau Canal, Ottawa Canals, St Christopher, St Helena, St Lucia, St Vincent's, Santa Maura, Sierra Leone, Toronto, Tobago, Trincomalee, Trinidad and Zante), the Royal Military College at Sandhurst, the Royal Hospital at Chelsea, the Royal Military Asylum at Chelsea and Southampton, Army Agents, General Agents for the Recruiting Service, and Army general staff and governors of forts and garrisons in Ireland.
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British Army administration
 (1841)
British Army officers (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists general and field officers of the British Army - five Field Marshals, 95 generals, 138 major-generals, 310 colonels, 637 lieutenant-colonels, 697 majors, in order of precedence according to year of precedence, and with the regiment indicated for each; then there are aides-de-camp to her Majesty queen Victoria; retired officers specially allowed to retain their ranks; and then the queen's land forces, set out regiment by regiment and battalion by battalion, naming the colonel, lieutenant-colonel and major for each, officers of the British garrisons, and of the Tower of London; and the officers of the Royal Regiment of Artillery (including the Field Train) and the Corps of Royal Engineers, by rank.
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British Army officers
 (1841)
British diplomats abroad (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists her Majesty's ministers in Austria, Bavaria, Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, Denmark, France, the Germanic Confederation, Greece, Hanover, Mexico, Naples, Netherlands, Portugal, Prussia, Russia, Sardinia, Saxony, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Tuscany, the United States of America, the United Provinces of the Rio de la Plata, Venezuela and Wurtemburg; and British consuls in Austria, Barbary, Belgium, the Brazils, Buenos Ayres, Central America, Chile, Denmark, Egypt, Ecuador, France, Frankfurt, New Granada, Greece, the Hanseatic Republic, Haiti, Mexico, Monte Video, the Netherlands, Palestine, Peru Bolivia, Poland, Portugal, Prussia, the Roman States, Russia, the Sandwich and Society Islands, Sardinia, Saxony, the Two Sicilies, Spain, Sweden and Norway, Syria, Turley, Tuscany, the United States of America and Venezuela.
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British diplomats abroad 
 (1841)
Churchmen and church officers in England and Wales (1841)
The Royal Kalendar has an extensive ecclesiastical section, giving the names of officials at the College of Doctors of (church) Law, the Ecclesiastical Courts, and the ecclesiastical law proctors; deans, chancellors, archdeacons, canons and prebendaries for all the dioceses of England and Wales; the officers and fellows (being all the parish priests within and without the walls of London) of Sion College; and the incumbents of the parishes within ten miles of London (annotated to show whether rectors, vicars or curates, and with the net annual revenue of each cure); the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England; the Committee of Council on Education; and then the officers of the various religious societies (Queen Anne's Bounty Office, and First-Fruits and Tenths Offices; Commissioners for Building Additional Churches; Society for Promoting the Building of Churches and Chapels; Anniversary Festival of the Sons of the Clergy; Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge; Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts; Dissenters' Library; Society for Maintaining and Educating Poor Orphans of Clergymen of the Established Church; Society for Promoting Religious Knowledge; Patrons of the Anniversary of the Charity Schools; Naval and Military Bible Society; Society for the Support and Encouragement of Sunday Schools throughout the British Dominions; Society for Extending the Christian Faith in the British West India Islands; London Missionary Society; Religious Tract Society; Society for the Suppression of Vice; British and Foreign Bible Society; Church Missionary Society; Prayer Book and Homily Society; Dr Bray's Institution; London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews; National Society for the Education of the Poor in the Principles of the Established Church; Church Pastoral Aid Society; European Missionary Society; British Society for Promoting the Religious Principles of the Reformation; and the Protestant Association).
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Churchmen and church officers in England and Wales
 (1841)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1841)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders, in England and Wales
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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1841)
Dividends of bankrupts' estates (1841)
Dividends from moneys raised from bankrupts' estates in England and Wales
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Dividends of bankrupts' estates
 (1841)
English academics (1841)
Professors and officials of the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, and London, are listed in the Royal Kalendar.
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English academics
 (1841)
English lawyers (1841)
The Royal Kalendar has a Law Department listing justices and officials of the High Court of Chancery; Masters in Chancery; Crown Office; Six Clerks Office; Register Office in Chancery Lane; Office of Reports and Entries; Affidavit Office; Hanaper Office; Examiner's Office; Petty Bag and Cursitors Office; Subpoena Office; Lord Chancellors officers; Vice-Chancellor's officers; officers to the Master of the Rolls; the Public Record Office at Rolls House; the Court of Bankruptcy; the Court for Relief of Insolvent Debtors; Court of Queen's Bench; Court of Common Pleas; Court of Exchequer; Exchequer Office of Pleas; Register of Deeds in the county of Middlesex; Queen's Sergeants and Counsel; Duchy Court of Lancaster; County Palatine of Lancaster; and County Palatine of Durham; Marshalsea and Palace-Court; Court of Westminster; with lists of the Lord Lieutenants and Sheriffs in England and Wales; and officials of the Inns of Court. There is also a list of the committee of the Law Society of the United Kingdom.
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English lawyers
 (1841)
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