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Clergy on the committees of the Anglican Church Congress (1892)
The 32nd annual congress of the Anglican church was held at Folkestone on the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th October 1892. Moral and social questions were discussed as well as the purely theological and ecclesiastical - The Relation between the Authority of the Bible and the Authority of the Church; the Attitude of the Church towards Labour Combinations; the Work of the Church of England on the Continent; the Result of the Neglect of Religious Instruction in Elementary Schools; Canon Law; the Duty of the Church to the Agricultural Population; Christian Ethics; Meeting of Women; the Temperance Movement; Physical Recreation; the Permanent Value of the Old Testament; Thrift and the Poor Law; Vivisection; Preparation for Clerical Orders, and of Laymen for Evangelism; Foreign Missions; the Duty of the Church towards Soldiers; Christian Doctrine and Christian Life; Preaching in the Church of England; and the Church's Work at the Seaside. The sermons, letters, addresses and discussions (of clergy and laity) were all published in this, the official report of the congress. The report also included lists of the members of the committees, divided into clergy and laity: this is the index to the clergy.
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Clergy on the committees of the Anglican Church Congress
 (1892)
Guarantors of the Anglican Church Congress (1892)
The 32nd annual congress of the Anglican church was held at Folkestone on the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th October 1892. Moral and social questions were discussed as well as the purely theological and ecclesiastical - The Relation between the Authority of the Bible and the Authority of the Church; the Attitude of the Church towards Labour Combinations; the Work of the Church of England on the Continent; the Result of the Neglect of Religious Instruction in Elementary Schools; Canon Law; the Duty of the Church to the Agricultural Population; Christian Ethics; Meeting of Women; the Temperance Movement; Physical Recreation; the Permanent Value of the Old Testament; Thrift and the Poor Law; Vivisection; Preparation for Clerical Orders, and of Laymen for Evangelism; Foreign Missions; the Duty of the Church towards Soldiers; Christian Doctrine and Christian Life; Preaching in the Church of England; and the Church's Work at the Seaside. The sermons, letters, addresses and discussions (of clergy and laity) were all published in this, the official report of the congress. The congress cost 1,822 14s 1d to hold; the receipts were 1,547 18s 5d, leaving a deficiency of 274 15s 8d, which was raised by call on the guarantors. The full list of the guarantors (who had each pledged from 10s to 200 beforehand) was printed in the official report, and this, together with the names of a handful of donors, is indexed here.
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Guarantors of the Anglican Church Congress
 (1892)
Boys entering Westminster School (1883-1893)
This supplement to the Westminster School Register was published in 1894. It lists boys entering the school from October 1883 to October 1884. They are listed alphabetically by surname and full christian names (in bold), with name, address and (often) occupation of father; sometimes mother's name and maiden name; date of birth; date of admission; and date of leaving. There are further brief notes where the boy had already gone on to university, or was known to have embarked on a career.
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Boys entering Westminster School
 (1883-1893)
Boys entering Haileybury College, Hertfordshire (1893)
Haileybury College, near Hertford, was founded by the East India Company in 1806, and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1864. This register of pupils entering the school from 1862 to 1931 was edited by a master there, Laurence Arthur Speakman. The boys are listed by term of joining the school, and then alphabetically by name (in bold), surname first (in capitals). There is then usually a precise birthdate, and the name and address of his father; his period at the school, starting with abbreviations to indicate the house to which he belonged (B., Batten; B. F., Bartle Frere; C., Colvin; E., Edmonstone; Ha., Hailey; Hi., Highfield; L., Lawrence; Le B., Le Bas; M., Melvill; Th., Thomason; T., Trevelyan), and the first and last forms attended (e. g., IV., fourth form). Where a member of a school team there is then an indication (e. g., XI., cricket). For some pupils, with whom the school had lost touch, Speakman was only able to record the details of their time at Haileybury; but for most a brief career synopsis is then given, and current address (as in 1931) or date of death.
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Boys entering Haileybury College, Hertfordshire
 (1893)
Boys entering Harrow School (1894)
This Second Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; a synopsis of his career; and, where known, his address as of 1925, in italics.
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Boys entering Harrow School
 (1894)
Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man (1894)
King William's College at Castletown on the Isle of Man was established in 1830. By 1928 about 290 boys were being educated there, 'of whom three-fourths are boarders, and the remainders sons of natives or residents in the Island.' Boys entered the junior school about 9 or 10 years of age, the upper school about 13; boys over 13 were not admitted 'unless attainments and character are specially satisfactory'. There were 'several nominations for the sons of clergy and others'. Editions of the college register were published in 1905 and 1927. When this third edition was prepared, in 1956, it was felt unnecessary to repeat the whole of the register from 1830 onwards, a new starting point being chosen as September 1886, when the reverend Frank Bridgman Walters took office as principal. The items are arranged alphabetically within term of entry; surname is given first, in bold, and then full christian names; then, to the right, in bold, precise date of birth, school house, and month of leaving the school. The abbreviations for houses are: C, Colbourne; D, Dickson; H, Hunt; Ha, Hangoside; J, Junior House; R, Raglan; S, School House (formerly Principal's); T, town houses occupied by masters who took in boys prior to September 1889; Tr, Trafford's; W, Walters. Each entry then gives the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address at that time; school honours (such as Prae., praepositor, XI, school cricket team); a career synopsis; and finally, in italics, to the right, year of death, or present address in 1956, if known.
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Boys entering King William's College, Isle of Man
 (1894)
Wimbledon schoolgirls and schoolmistresses (1894)
Wimbledon High School produced a yearly magazine, issued in December, starting in 1889. Each issue contained general school news, sporting and scholastic results, essays, reports from the school societies (circles and clubs) and news of old girls, with their marriages, births of their children (giving both maiden and married surnames), and deaths. The old girls were organized into what was called the Wimbledon High School Union (W. H. S. U.) and there is news of the Union's doings and of new recruits - the school was opened in 1880, nine years before the Union was formed, and some girls had lost contact.
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Wimbledon schoolgirls and schoolmistresses
 (1894)
Boys entering Epsom College (1895)
The Royal Medical Benevolent College at Epsom in Surrey was founded in 1853 for the orphans of the medical profession, and evolved to become a public school still largely catering for sons of doctors and surgeons. In 1955 this register of pupils, from 1855 to 1954, edited by T. R. Thomson, was published. The sample scan is from 1880. The entries are arranged alphabetically by surname under year of entrance to the school; surname first (in bold), christian names, and then (in most cases), the father's name, occupation and address: then the boy's year of birth (b.), year of leaving (l.), occupation, and, where known, year of death (d.). From 1880 onwards the house to which the boy belonged is also indicated: the boarding houses were Carr (C.), Forest (F.), Granville (G.), Holman (H.), Propert (P.) and Wilson (W.); and Crawfurd (Cr.), Hart Smith (H. S.) and Rosebery (R.) are the houses for day scholars. From 1895 to 1927 there was a junior school, called Lower School (L. S.), taking in boys from the age of 8, many passing seamlessly into the main school at age 12 to 14. This is the index to the year 1895, when the Reverend Thomas Northmore Hart-Smith was headmaster.
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Boys entering Epsom College
 (1895)
Boys entering Harrow School (1895)
This Second Volume of the Second Series of the Harrow School Register was edited by J. H. Stogdon and published in 1925. The boys are listed by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname and christian names (in bold). Next, in brackets and in italics, is the school house to which he belonged - or, H. B. indicating a day boy whose family lived in Harrow. Stogdon then gives the father's surname and initials, and address. In cases where the boy was prominent in sports at school, or won academic prizes, scholarships &c., that is given; then the year of leaving the school; a synopsis of his career; and, where known, his address as of 1925, in italics.
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Boys entering Harrow School
 (1895)
Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire (1895)
Wellington College, near Wokingham, was originally founded for the education of sons of military officers. A register of boys entering the school from First Term 1859 to Michaelmas 1933 was compiled by F. G. Lawrence for the Old Wellingtonian Society. In each entry the boy's name is given in full, in bold, surname first; age at entry (usually 11 to 14); then, in brackets, the name of the dormitory or house to which he belonged, in italics, with the years of his stay; then his father's name (usually surname and initials, but not christian name) with military decorations where appropriate. School prefects and captains are noted as such; if the boy played cricket for the school, XI with the years; academic honours, scholarships, &c.; a brief biography; and date of death, or (where known) address in 1933. Year of marriage is given, and sometimes the wife's name and/or her father's name. Clearly, those boys who kept contact with the school and/or had distinguished military careers have detailed entries; others disappeared into oblivion on leaving.
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Boys entering Wellington College in Berkshire
 (1895)
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