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Bankrupts: Adjournment of Meetings (1854)
Adjournments of meetings of creditors of bankrupts in England and Wales
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Bankrupts: Adjournment of Meetings
 (1854)
Bankrupts' Assignees (1854)
Assignees of bankrupts' estates (usually principal creditors and/or close relatives of the bankrupt) in England and Wales
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Bankrupts' Assignees
 (1854)
Bankrupts' Estates (1854)
Transfers of bankrupts' estates in England and Wales to assignees
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Bankrupts' Estates
 (1854)
Boys entering Cheltenham College (1854)
Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).
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Boys entering Cheltenham College 
 (1854)
Boys entering Marlborough College (1854)
The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, where a boarder, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.
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Boys entering Marlborough College
 (1854)
Bribed in Hull (1854)
A Bill for the Prevention of Bribery in the Election of Members to serve in Parliament for the Borough of Kingston-upon-Hull, passed 11 April 1854, stated that a commission of inquiry 30 August 1853 had found that over a hundred voters were bribed at one or more of the elections for the borough in 1841, 1847 and 1852: the names of those bribed, and those who gave the bribes, were listed in the bill, and all those persons were disqualified from any future parliamentary elections for the borough.
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Bribed in Hull
 (1854)
Bribers in Hull (1854)
A Bill for the Prevention of Bribery in the Election of Members to serve in Parliament for the Borough of Kingston-upon-Hull, passed 11 April 1854, stated that a commission of inquiry 30 August 1853 had found that over a hundred voters were bribed at one or more of the elections for the borough in 1841, 1847 and 1852: the names of those bribed, and those who gave the bribes, were listed in the bill, and all those persons were disqualified from any future parliamentary elections for the borough.
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Bribers in Hull
 (1854)
British soldiers killed at Inkerman (1854)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. In the battle of Inkerman, of November 1854, the Russian troops made an ultimately unsuccessful attack on the allied army. In December the War Office issued lists of soldiers killed and wounded at Inkerman: there are separate returns for 2 to 6 November, 7 to 20 November, and 21 to 26 November, as well as one for soldiers missing, and one for members of the Naval Brigade killed and wounded. This is the list of British soldiers killed at Inkerman 7 to 20 November 1854.
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British soldiers killed at Inkerman
 (1854)
British soldiers wounded at Inkerman (1854)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. In the battle of Inkerman, of November 1854, the Russian troops made an ultimately unsuccessful attack on the allied army. In December the War Office issued lists of soldiers killed and wounded at Inkerman: there are separate returns for 2 to 6 November, 7 to 20 November, and 21 to 26 November, as well as one for soldiers missing, and one for members of the Naval Brigade killed and wounded. This is the list of British soldiers wounded at Inkerman 2 to 6 November 1854.
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British soldiers wounded at Inkerman
 (1854)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1854)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad. July to December 1854
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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1854)
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