Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Fish Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fish'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 714 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Open Access
Buying all 714 results of this search individually would cost £4,108.00. But you can have free access to all 714 records for a year, to view, to save and print, for £100. Save £4,008.00. More...

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Cheshire Court Rolls (1259-1290)
Civil and criminal cases for most of Cheshire were handled by the county courts. Here we have the county court rolls for November 1259 to August 1260, December 1281 to September 1282, and December 1286 to September 1289. The city of Chester exercised its own jurisdiction, and here we have crown pleas and presentments from 1287 to 1297. The royal manor of Macclesfield in the east of the county had three independent jurisdictions - the hundred, forest and borough. Royal justices in eyre dealt with civil and criminal cases from the hundred and forest during their yearly visits, and here we have records from 1284 to 1290. Also covered by this index is an Inquest of Service in Time of War in Wales of 1288, listing knight's fees in the county.

FISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Cheshire Court Rolls
 (1259-1290)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1320-1329)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 13th year of the reign of king Edward II to the 3rd year of king Edward III.

FISH. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1320-1329)
Inhabitants of Norwich (1307-1341)
This calendar of the deeds enrolled from 1307 to 1341 was compiled for the corporation by Edith Crosse (MacKinnon), indexed by Walter Rye, and published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1915. They are set out chronologically, translated from the original Latin into English, giving the name and occupation of grantor and grantee, and naming the parish in which the property lay. Precise dates are not given, just the regnal year.

FISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Norwich
 (1307-1341)
Testators and legatees in London (1258-1358)
The mediaeval Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1889. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. Sometimes there were further proceedings in the court relating to the will, such as 'It was found by a jury that the testator was of full age when he made the above testament', a statement as to where the testament had been proved, or proceedings on a challenge to the testament &c. - such additional material is added in a smaller typeface in this edition.

FISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Testators and legatees in London
 (1258-1358)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1342-1362)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Clement VI and Innocent VI, from the period when the papal court was resident at Avignon. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Clement VI was consecrated and crowned 19 May 1342 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); Innocent VI was crowned 18 December 1352 and died 12 September 1362. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss and C. Johnson from Regesta cxxxvii to ccxliv, and published in 1897. The registers are almost complete for these two pontificates. At his accession, Clement VI promised to grant benefices to all poor clerks who should come to Avignon and claim them within two months of his coronation. As many as 100,000 are said to have come, and the register for the first year of his pontificate runs to twelve volumes.

FISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1342-1362)
Inhabitants of Norwich (1288-1391)
Among the documents preserved in the record room of the Guildhall in the city of Norwich were 13 rolls connected with the leet courts in the city during the 13th and 14th centuries while the frankpledge system on which they were based was still in full operation. William Hudson, vicar of St Peter Permountergate in the city, prepared a copy of the earliest of these, from 1288, and extracts from the leet rolls of 1289, 1290, 1291, 1293, 1296, 1300, c1307, 1313, 1375 and 1391, and from an account of amercements in 1364, a tithing roll of Mancroft leet of 1311, and inquisitions before the bailiffs in 1350, and these were published by the Selden Society in 1892, with an English translation facing the extended Latin text. In 1288 there were four leets in the city - Conesford (North Conesford, South Conesford and Berstrete subleets), Manecroft (St Stephen, St Peter de Manecroft), Wymer or Westwyk (St Giles, St Gregory, St Andrew and St George), and Over the Water (St Michael and St Clement. Each leet had separate courts and separate records within the rolls. Hudson lists the main categories of items recorded as: murder, violent death, nuisances, weights, unwholesome food, larceny, assaults, hue and cry, being out of tithing, non-attendance at leet, purprestures, forestalling, unlawful trading, craft gilds, fraudulent work, and impleading in the Court Christian.

FISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Norwich
 (1288-1391)
London and Middlesex Feet of Fines (1198-1485)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in London and Middlesex.

FISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London and Middlesex Feet of Fines
 (1198-1485)
Inhabitants of Leicester (1327-1509)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1901) of extracts from the borough archives of 1327 to 1509, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: a coroner's roll of 1327; the merchant gild rolls; tax returns; court rolls; rentals; mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for tallages of 1336 (pp. 34-40); 1347-8 (69-71); and 1354 (93-99); subsidy rolls of 1492 (331-334) and 1497 (351-353); and a benevolence roll of 1505 (370-374). There is a calendar of conveyances (388-446), and a list of mayors, bailiffs, and other officials (447-462); and, finally, entrants into the merchant gild from 1465 to 1510. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). Those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but thitherto the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there.

FISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1327-1509)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

FISH. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
London and Middlesex Feet of Fines (1485-1569)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in London and Middlesex.

FISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
London and Middlesex Feet of Fines
 (1485-1569)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.