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Rody Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'rody'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire (1361-1370)
The register of bishop Louis de Charltone of Hereford, containing general diocesan business, but also including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire.

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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire
 (1361-1370)
The English in France (1420-1421)
King Henry V of England claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. He married Katherine, youngest daughter of king Charles VI of France in 1420, and thereafter styled himself 'heir and regent of France'. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. This calendar of the French Roll for the 8th year of the reign of Henry V (21 March 1420 to 20 March 1421) was prepared by Alexander Charles Ewald and published in 1883.

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The English in France
 (1420-1421)
The English in France (1426)
King Henry VI of England (one of the grandsons of Charles VI of France) claimed the throne of France (and quartered the fleurs-de-lis of France with the lions of England on the royal standard) as had his predecessors since Edward III, as descendants of Philip IV of France. The English had real power or influence in Brittany, Normandy, Flanders and Gascony, and actual possession of several coastal garrisons, in particular Calais, where the French inhabitants had been replaced by English. Henry VI came to the throne only seven years after his father had trounced the French at Agincourt; but his cousin, Charles VII, who became king of France in the same year, spent his long reign rebutting the English king's claim to his throne by territorial reconquest and consolidation. The English administration kept a series of records called the French Rolls. On these are recorded royal appointments and commissions in France; letters of protection and safe-conduct to soldiers, merchants, diplomats and pilgrims travelling to France from England and returning, and to foreign legations. There are also licences to merchants to export to the Continent, and to captains to transport pilgrims. As Henry VI's reign progressed, and the English grip on northern France loosened, the French Rolls also increasingly include entries concerning the ransoming of English prisoners.

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The English in France
 (1426)
Close Rolls (1441-1447)
The close rolls of the 20th to 25th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1441-1447)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in York (1756)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Liverpool return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/52

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Masters of apprentices registered in York
 (1756)
Workers at Houldsworth's Cotton Mill, Manchester (1818)
The minutes of evidence taken before the Lords Committee on the Cotton Factories Bill include a series of reports by medical men as to the general health of the mill workers in April 1818. For each factory there is a complete list of workers, giving full name, age, how long employed in a factory, health (in general terms, such as 'Good' or 'Sickly'), and any chronic disease or 'distortion', cause and duration - with slight variations from report to report. The physicians examined several hundred people each day, asking such questions as 'Have you any swellings or sores anywhere?', 'Are your limbs straight?', 'Have you a good appetite for food?', 'Do you conceive yourself to be in good health?', and all concluded that the health of the mill workers was good, and that the workers were cheerful. This is the report for Thomas Houldsworth's cotton spinning factory, Manchester, 27 April 1818.

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Workers at Houldsworth's Cotton Mill, Manchester
 (1818)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1827)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1827)
British in India and Ceylon, China and Australasia (1836)
Births, marriages and deaths, civil, ecclesiastical and military promotions, furloughs, reports of shipping to and from England and the East, with passenger lists, and news items published in the Asiatic Journal

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British in India and Ceylon, China and Australasia
 (1836)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1900)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This appendix to the list was issued in about 1900.

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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1900)

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