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Roe Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'roe'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 1121 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Lancashire landowners and their tenants (1310-1333)
This compilation of abstracts of Lancashire inquisitions, extents (surveys) and feudal aids (taxes) was prepared for the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society and printed in 1907, from originals in the national archives of the Public Record Office. Almost all the material has been translated from the original abbreviated Latin: where surnames have been Anglicized, the original is shown in italics, as with the word 'faber' in the sample scan.

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Lancashire landowners and their tenants
 (1310-1333)
Hertfordshire Charters (1480-1489)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Hertfordshire Charters
 (1480-1489)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1484-1492)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of pope Innocent VIII. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which most of the key government and ecclesiastical records of this period are lost. Innocent VIII was consecrated and crowned 12 September 1484 (the day from which his pontificate is dated) and died at Rome 25 July 1492. The extracts were made by J. A. Twemlow from Vatican Regesta dclxxxii to dcclxxi and Lateran Regesta dcccxxxviii to dcccxl.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1484-1492)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular (1504)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 21 December 1504 by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular
 (1504)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Regular (1510)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i.e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 25 May 1510, by bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Longdon prebendal church.

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Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Subdeacons Regular (1510)
Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire (1406-1535)
The Hospital of the Holy Cross was founded in 1269; in time this fraternity became a social and religious gild. 'The Register of the Gild of the Holy Cross, the Blessed Mary and St John the Baptist of Stratford-upon-Avon' was edited by J. Harvey Bloom, rector of Whitchurch, and printed in 1907. The register is a record of admissions to the gild, an account of the fines paid by new members, and the names of those in arrear. Each year's record usually starts on the Monday after Ascension Day (the sixth Thursday after Easter), when the new aldermen, master and proctors of the gild were elected, all duly named. Then follow the admissions to the gild, including payments for prayers and candles (lights) for the faithful dead; and the names of the sureties for these payments. Interspersed with this are occasional proclamations and memoranda concerning the fraternity. A peculiarity of this publication is that the years given at the head of each page (e. g. 1502-3) are those of the regnal year (in that case 18 Henry VII) in which the Monday after Ascension Day fell. The regnal years of Henry IV, Henry VI, Richard III and Henry VII all started after that day in the calendars of 1399, 1422, 1483 and 1485; so the gild registers during those years actually cover the following year to that shown in this printed text (in that case, 1503-4).

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Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire
 (1406-1535)
Inhabitants of Nottingham (1485-1547)
The muniments of the borough of Nottingham include extensive mediaeval archives. A selection from these from the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII was prepared and edited by W. H. Stevenson for the Corporation, and printed, with translations of the passages in Latin, in 1885. The principal sources used are the borough Court Books, largely dealing with civil cases, for which an almost complete series survives for this period; Sessions Rolls (92 survive for the two reigns), in which crimes and misdemeanours are recorded; a Mickletorn or Leet jury roll; detailed chamberlains' and bridge-wardens' accounts; and the Hall Books, or council minutes. There are lists of burgesses enrolled; bakers admitted to bake; and fines for licences to trade. A subsidy roll of 1523-4 lists householders by street, and there is an appendix of local deeds, including some material dating back to the 14th century.

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Inhabitants of Nottingham
 (1485-1547)
Inhabitants of Ludlow in Shropshire (1540-1574)
The borough of Ludlow comprised a single ancient parish in the diocese of Hereford. The churchwardens' accounts from 1540 to 1574 were transcribed by Thomas Wright for the Camden Society and published in 1869. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: their accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Wright looked through the remainder of the first surviving book of churchwardens' accounts, which extended to the end of the reign of queen Elizabeth, but found them largely repetitive, and chose to give just a few entries from them in an appendix, including the names of the churchwardens for each year.

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Inhabitants of Ludlow in Shropshire
 (1540-1574)
Prisoners in the Tower of London (1585)
Sir Owen Hopton, the Lieutenant of the Tower of London, submitted quarterly claims for the expenses of keeping the political and religious dissidents (mostly Roman Catholic recusants) in his charge - a 'keeper' at 5s a week, fuel and candles at 4s a week, and for himself 13s 4d a week, for each prisoner. Those who died in prison or were executed during the period are marked with the word 'mort.' This is the return for Michaelmas 1585.

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Prisoners in the Tower of London
 (1585)
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