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Grenewey Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'grenewey'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Pipe Roll (1241-1242)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the roll for the 26th year of the reign of king Henry III, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1241 to Michaelmas 1242. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and fines or pardons arising from the proceedings of the justices. The text was edited by Henry Lewin Cannon for Yale Historical Publications and printed in 1918. The name of the county is given at the head of each page, and variant spellings, omissions and additions found in the duplicate Chancellor's Roll [C. R.] are given in the footnotes.

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Pipe Roll
 (1241-1242)
Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Northumberland (1215-1255)
The register of archbishop Walter Gray of York, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy. The diocese of York at this period covered all of Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, as well as Lancashire north of the Ribble, southern Westmorland, and Hexhamshire in Northumberland. The register survives as two rolls (called the Major and the Minor), in all amounting to nearly 71 feet of parchment. It is thought that a third roll or more has been lost, because the acts of the archbishop for the last ten years of his episcopate are missing, as are all the ordination and ecclesiastical discipline records for his reign. The then unpublished parts of the register were edited for the Surtees Society by James Raine and printed in 1870, with some additional material included in appendices.

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Northumberland
 (1215-1255)
Cheshire Court Rolls (1259-1290)
Civil and criminal cases for most of Cheshire were handled by the county courts. Here we have the county court rolls for November 1259 to August 1260, December 1281 to September 1282, and December 1286 to September 1289. The city of Chester exercised its own jurisdiction, and here we have crown pleas and presentments from 1287 to 1297. The royal manor of Macclesfield in the east of the county had three independent jurisdictions - the hundred, forest and borough. Royal justices in eyre dealt with civil and criminal cases from the hundred and forest during their yearly visits, and here we have records from 1284 to 1290. Also covered by this index is an Inquest of Service in Time of War in Wales of 1288, listing knight's fees in the county.

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Cheshire Court Rolls
 (1259-1290)
Kent Charters (1320-1329)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a very general sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become standard until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Kent Charters
 (1320-1329)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1330-1339)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 3rd to the 13th years of king Edward III.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1330-1339)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1413-1416)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd years of the reign of king Henry V (21 March 1413 to 20 March 1416) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. C. Fowler, and published in 1910. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. The commissions of the peace issued for the English towns and counties and entered on the rolls, being largely repetitive, have been consolidated in a single appendix.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1413-1416)
Close Rolls (1441-1447)
The close rolls of the 20th to 25th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1441-1447)
Patent Roll 1 Henry VIII (1509-1510)
Royal grants of all kinds were enrolled on the Patent Rolls of England. Many of these grants originated as signed bills (S. B.) or privy seals (P. S.). J. S. Brewer calendared the rolls for the first year of the reign of king Henry VIII (22 April 1509-21 April 1510) for the Master of the Rolls, including all the surviving signed bills and privy seals (some of which had never led to enrolment), in this volume published in 1862. We have reindexed this: most of the names that occur are of those granted royal offices, or wardships or ecclesiastical preferments that were in the hands of the Crown, and often the names of those whom they superseded.

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Patent Roll 1 Henry VIII 
 (1509-1510)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
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