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Gayner Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'gayner'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 48 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Fine Rolls (1369-1377)
The fine rolls of the 43rd to 51st years of the reign of king Edward III record part of the government administration in England, with orders sent out day by day to individual officers, and commitment of particular responsibilities and duties. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

GAYNER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Fine Rolls
 (1369-1377)
Fine Rolls (1377-1383)
The fine rolls of the 1st to 6th years of the reign of king Richard II record part of the government administration in England, with orders sent out day by day to individual officers, and commitment of particular responsibilities and duties. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

GAYNER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Fine Rolls
 (1377-1383)
Landowners and tenants in Gloucestershire (1345-1485)
Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendar by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.

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Landowners and tenants in Gloucestershire
 (1345-1485)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1590-1591)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters. 1 October 1590 to 24 March 1591.

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1590-1591)
Cecil Manuscripts (1594-1595)
Letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil and the Earl of Essex.

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Cecil Manuscripts
 (1594-1595)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms (1619)
Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Bridegrooms
 (1619)
Colonists and adventurers (1610-1660)
During this period, the English crown issued charters to companies of adventurers and individual proprietors to establish settlements in Acadia (Nova Scotia), Africa, Amazon, Anguilla, Antigua, Association (Tortuga), Bahamas, Barbadoes, Barbuda, Bermudas (Somers Islands), Canada, Cape Gratia de Dios, Carolina, Bay of Darien, Delaware Bay, Deseada, Dominica, Eleuthera, Enegada, Fernando de Noronho, Floria, Fonseca, Grenada, Guadaloupe, Guiana, Guinea, Henrietta, Jamaica, Long Island, Maine, Marigalante, Maryland, Metalina, Montserrat, Narrangansetts Bay, Nevis, New England (New Plymouth, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Haven), Newfoundland, New Hampshire, New York, Nova Scotia, Providence Island, Quebec, Redendo, Rhode Island, St Bartholomew, St Brandon, St Christopher's, St Eustache, St Lucia, St Martin, St Vincent, Sembrera, Surinam, Tadousac, Tobago, Todosantes, Trinidad and Virginia. The central archive relating to these ventures up to 1688 amounted to 71 volumes of correspondence, plus 109 entry books containing entries of letters sent to the colonies, of charters, commissions and instructions, minutes and proceedings of the companies and proprietaries that in the first instance governed several of the colonies, journals of the Board of Trade, &c. This archive, called the State Papers, Colonial Series, at the Public Record Office, was calendared for the period through to 1660 by W. Noel Sainsbury, and published in 1860. The first few pages include material as early as 1574, but the bulk of the volume is from 1610 to 1660, and that is indexed here.

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Colonists and adventurers
 (1610-1660)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1720)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 5 September to 31 December 1720.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1720)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered at Gloucester (1741-1745)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Masters of Apprentices registered at Gloucester
 (1741-1745)
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