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Gayne Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'gayne'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 13 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Guisborough Cartulary (1119-1300)
The Augustinian (black canons) priory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Guisborough (Gyseburne) near Middlesbrough in north Yorkshire, was founded about 1119 by Robert de Brus. The 1100 or so grants of land (mostly in Cleveland) made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which survives as Cottonian Manuscript Cleopatra d ii (British Library). This was edited by W. Brown and published by the Surtees Society from 1889. This first part contains the charters from folios 1 to 233, items I to DXCIII. The texts have been stripped of repetitious legal formulae, retaining the details of the grantors, the property, and the witnesses: so the individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated.

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Guisborough Cartulary
 (1119-1300)
Inhabitants of Howden in the East Riding of Yorkshire (1379)
The poll tax returns of the 2nd year of the reign of king Richard II for Howdenshire, the area around Howden, were transcribed from the original in the Public Record Office (Exchequer Lay Subsidies 202/69) and published in the Yorkshire Archaeological & Topographical Journal in 1886. In editing the text, the abbreviated Latin has been extended, and those occupations that appear have been put in italics. The normal tax for a husbandman or labourer and his wife was 4d, as was that for a single person; but tradesmen paid 6d or more.

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Inhabitants of Howden in the East Riding of Yorkshire
 (1379)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Harthill wapentake (1380)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Market Weighton, Pocklington and South Cave.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Harthill wapentake
 (1380)
Militia in Bruton hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Bruton, Milton Clevedon, North Brewham, Pitcombe, South Brewham, Upton Noble (former chapelry of Batcombe) and Yarlington. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Bruton hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Militia in Horethorne hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Abbas & Temple Combe, Charlton Horethorne, Corton Denham, Goathill, Henstridge, Holwell (detached), Horsington, Marston Magna, (the town of) Milborne Port, North Cheriton, Pointington, Stonwell and Trent. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Horethorne hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Officers at the Battle of Almanza (1707)
25 April 1707 at Almanza in southeast Spain a decisive battle was fought in the war of the Spanish succession; the French (under the Duke of Berwick) shattered an Anglo-Spanish army (under the Earl of Galway) advancing on Madrid. In January 1711 the House of Lords held an inquiry into the debacle, and among the papers produced was this 'List of the Names of the General Officers and other Commission Officers that were at the Battle of Almanza'. Arranged by regiment, it gives full names of captains, lieutenants, cornets, quartermasters, chaplains, surgeons and adjutants. In almost every case the lists are annotated as to whether each officer was actually present at the battle (most were), and whether killed in the conflict. The list was edited by Maurice F. Bond, clerk of the records to the House, and published in 1949.

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Officers at the Battle of Almanza
 (1707)
Citizens of London: Curriers (1724)
A list of the persons who polled for Charles Goodfellow esquire at the late election for a member of parliament to represent the city of London, held 23rd to 28th November 1724. Full names are given, surname first, arranged by the livery companies to which the citizens belonged. This list was published in The Daily Post and elsewhere: 'Gentlemen, we desire you will carefully examine the following list of polsters, and in case you find yourselves or friends polled by others, or any polled who are dead or absent, or who have no right, that you'll give immediate notice thereof at Salter's Hall in Swithin's Lane, where attendance will be daily given from 8 a-clock in the morning till 9 a-clock at night. It is not doubted but the endeavours to obtain a law to secure your invaded rights and privileges will be soon successful, this should now excite you to a diligent search after false pollers, which will in all probability make the majority greater for sir Richard Hopkins. N.B. The scrutineers so far as they have proceeded, do find a much greater number of false pollers for Mr Goodfellow, than for sir Richard Hopkins.'

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Citizens of London: Curriers
 (1724)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1900)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This appendix to the list was issued in about 1900.

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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1900)
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