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Garth Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'garth'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 285 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire (1266-1279)
The register of archbishop Walter Giffard of York, containing general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, was edited by William Brown for the Surtees Society and published in 1904. The ancient diocese of York covered all of Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, as well as Lancashire north of the Ribble, southern Westmorland, and Hexhamshire in Northumberland. But there are few entries relating to the archdeaconry of Richmond, and few about the peculiar jurisdictions of Southwell, Ripon, Beverley and Hexham. The dioceses of Carlisle and Durham, both in the province of York, are hardly mentioned. Archbishop Giffard spent much of his pontificate away from his diocese, and the register has gaps: but at least it survives, unlike those for his immediate predecessors, Sewall de Boville (1256-1258) and Godfrey de Ludham (1258-1264). Moreover, there are ordination lists (pages 187 to 198) of acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests ordained in 1267 to 1274. These usually give full name, and indicate whether the man was 'religious' (a monk or friar), and whether his 'title' (sponsorship) arose from his own patrimony, but 'title' is not usually otherwise specified.

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Clerks and Clergy in Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, and parts of Lancashire
 (1266-1279)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1317-1321)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1350-1354)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 24th to the 27th years of the reign of king Edward III (25 January 1350 to 24 January 1354) were edited for the Public Record Office by R. F. Isaacson, and published in 1907. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1350-1354)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1342-1362)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Clement VI and Innocent VI, from the period when the papal court was resident at Avignon. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Clement VI was consecrated and crowned 19 May 1342 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); Innocent VI was crowned 18 December 1352 and died 12 September 1362. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss and C. Johnson from Regesta cxxxvii to ccxliv, and published in 1897. The registers are almost complete for these two pontificates. At his accession, Clement VI promised to grant benefices to all poor clerks who should come to Avignon and claim them within two months of his coronation. As many as 100,000 are said to have come, and the register for the first year of his pontificate runs to twelve volumes.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1342-1362)
Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Claro wapentake (1379)
The poll tax returns for this wapentake, the area around Aldborough, Boroughbridge, Knaresborough and Wetherby.

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Inhabitants of Yorkshire: Claro wapentake
 (1379)
Yorkshire Testators and Legatees (1426-1466)
Wills and testaments from the diocese of York (Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Hexhamshire, Lancashire north of the Ribble, and southwest Westmorland) registered at York. Richmond and Southwell archdeaconries had their own lower probate jurisdictions, so the wills registered at York are predominantly from the East and West Ridings and the eastern part of the North Riding of Yorkshire. In theory, wills dealt with real property and testaments with personal property, but the distinction hardly applies in practice: most of these wills are in Latin, but some are in English. Being before the Reformation, they commonly start with benefactions to churches, chantries, chapels, &c., and with provisions for the burning of candles ('lights') and saying of masses.

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Yorkshire Testators and Legatees
 (1426-1466)
Inhabitants of Leicester (1327-1509)
The Corporation of Leicester commissioned the publication (in 1901) of extracts from the borough archives of 1327 to 1509, edited by Mary Bateson. This volume brings together several important sources: a coroner's roll of 1327; the merchant gild rolls; tax returns; court rolls; rentals; mayoral accounts, &c. All the Latin and French texts are accompanied by English translations. Not all the tax rolls surviving for this period are printed: but full lists of names are given for tallages of 1336 (pp. 34-40); 1347-8 (69-71); and 1354 (93-99); subsidy rolls of 1492 (331-334) and 1497 (351-353); and a benevolence roll of 1505 (370-374). There is a calendar of conveyances (388-446), and a list of mayors, bailiffs, and other officials (447-462); and, finally, entrants into the merchant gild from 1465 to 1510. Membership of the merchant gild was by right of inheritance (s. p. = sede patris, in his father's seat), or by payment of a fee called a 'bull' (taurus). Those marked * paid their bull, and were thus, by implication, not natives, or at least not belonging to gild merchant families. By 1400 membership of the gild merchant had become the equivalent of gaining freedom of the borough (being a free burgess): but thitherto the two were not necessarily the same, and some of the merchant gild members were not resident in the borough, merely traded there.

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Inhabitants of Leicester
 (1327-1509)
Patent Roll 1 Henry VIII (1509-1510)
Royal grants of all kinds were enrolled on the Patent Rolls of England. Many of these grants originated as signed bills (S. B.) or privy seals (P. S.). J. S. Brewer calendared the rolls for the first year of the reign of king Henry VIII (22 April 1509-21 April 1510) for the Master of the Rolls, including all the surviving signed bills and privy seals (some of which had never led to enrolment), in this volume published in 1862. We have reindexed this: most of the names that occur are of those granted royal offices, or wardships or ecclesiastical preferments that were in the hands of the Crown, and often the names of those whom they superseded.

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Patent Roll 1 Henry VIII 
 (1509-1510)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Retired monks, nuns and chantry priests in the east Midlands (1547-1551)
Lists of pensions being paid to monks, nuns and chantry priests in the diocese of Lincoln after the dissolution of the monasteries and chantries. The diocese covered Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, part of Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Leicestershire and Lincolnshire. Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Rutland, which had been shorn from the diocese, are not covered by these returns.

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Retired monks, nuns and chantry priests in the east Midlands
 (1547-1551)
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