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Fulmer Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fulmer'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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Fine Rolls (1377-1383)
The fine rolls of the 1st to 6th years of the reign of king Richard II record part of the government administration in England, with orders sent out day by day to individual officers, and commitment of particular responsibilities and duties. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Fine Rolls
 (1377-1383)
London funerals and other news (1550-1563)
Henry Machyn was a citizen and merchant-taylor of London. He had a professional interest in the lavish funerals of his fellow citizens, and in October 1550 started a note book giving brief details of these occasions. Soon he added political news, and (in an age before newspapers) he had a journalist's eye for accidents, hangings, the preachings and suppression of heretics, and the fortunes and misfortunes of dissidents. He lived in interesting times; the early death of Edward VI; the failed attempt to install Jane on the throne; the succession of queen Mary, and a lurch towards Catholicism; her marriage to Philip of Spain; her death, and the accession of queen Elizabeth. Machyn's humble journal, written for his own amusement and with a resolute indifference to orthography, became in its time an important historical source, used by Strype, and then edited by John Gough Nichols for the Camden Society and published in 1848.

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London funerals and other news
 (1550-1563)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1669)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1669)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1725)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 14 August 1725.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1725)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1776)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1776)
City of Westminster Voters (1780)
The poll for the election of two citizens to serve in Parliament for the City and Liberty of Westminster was begun 7 September and ended 23 September 1780, the candidates being the Hon. Charles James Fox (F), Sir George Brydges Rodney, bart. (R), and the Right Hon. Thomas Pelham Clinton the Earl of Lincoln (L). In this poll book the names of all voters are given, by parish and within each parish by street, arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name, with the individual votes cast shown in the right hand columns. Pages 1 to 48 cover the parish of St George, Hanover Square; 49 to 100, St Martin; 101 to 134, St Clement and St Mary le Strand; 135 to 155, St Ann, Soho; 157 to 166, St Paul, Covent Garden; 167 to 170, St Martin le Grand; 171 to 224, St James; 225 to 274, St Margaret and St John.

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City of Westminster Voters
 (1780)
National ArchivesResidents of Duck Lane, Westminster (1851)
In the 1851 census, Westminster superintendent registrar's district, St Margaret's registrar's district, enumeration district 7 comprised part of St Margaret's parish and St Margaret's ecclesiastical district in the city of Westminster. HO 107/1480

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Residents of Duck Lane, Westminster
 (1851)
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