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Fullylove Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fullylove'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 6 records (displaying 1 to 6): 

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York Will Calendar (1660-1665)
The diocese of York comprised most of Yorkshire, and Nottinghamshire: the York Exchequer court was the ordinary probate jurisdiction for the Yorkshire part of the diocese, but some wills from Nottinghamshire and other parts of the province of York were also proved there. Dr Francis Collins compiled this index to the wills in the York registry proved from 1660 to 1665. The date of the probate precedes the name of the testator: during the period covered by the volume the dates of probate are very rarely given in the registers - they were therefore supplied from the Act Books. However, the Act Book for Ainsty, City and Craven deaneries is missing for this period, and in those cases no date could be given. In a very few instances (marked with an asterisk) in these deaneries in which the date has been supplied it has been taken from the registers. Additional matter from the Act Books is given within square brackets. Testators' names are given in full, surname first; then parish or place of abode, and in some cases occupation; then date of the will itself; and volume and folio number in the probate register. Where a place of burial, or intended burial, was indicated, that is also added, with the word 'bur.', within round brackets. All wills between 1652 and 1660 were proved in London; in practice, many Yorkshire wills had remained unproved at the date that the York Exchequer probate court was restored, and so there is in this list a large number of wills dating back through the 1650s.

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York Will Calendar
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
Inhabitants of Bulkington in Warwickshire (1850)
Francis White & Co.'s History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Warwickshire for 1850 lists nobility, gentry, clergy, other private residents, farmers and traders, hundred by hundred and village by village, with separate sections for the large towns.

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Inhabitants of Bulkington in Warwickshire
Money lenders and other creditors (1880)
Bills of sale transferred title in all property of a debtor to a specified creditor. Possession of a bill of sale thus protected a money lender or other creditor from losing a debtor's property to other creditors (except landlords) in case of insolvency or bankruptcy; and in many cases signing a bill of sale was a required step for a borrower securing a loan. The bill of sale specified the amount thereby secured, but could be open, i. e., allow for further drawings on the same account. Entries from the official register of bills of sales in England and Wales were published in Flint & Co.'s London Manchester and Dublin Mercantile Gazette, a weekly publication available only by subscription, issued under the motto "Security in Crediting". The entries are listed by county, then alphabetically by debtor, surname first, with address, trade, the name of the creditor ('in whose favour'), dates of issue and filing, and amount. An &c. after the amount indicates an open bill. The creditors that appear in the 'in whose favour' column are mainly, but not exclusively, loan companies and individual money lenders, and Jewish names figure prominently among the latter. When a loan was paid off, satisfaction of the bill of sale was entered on the register, and these satisfactions are also recorded in these pages. 1 January to 31 March 1880.

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Money lenders and other creditors
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1881)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, October to December 1881

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
County Court Judgments: Staffordshire (1890)
Extracts from the Registry of County Courts' Judgments. These judgments were not necessarily for debt. In some cases they were for damages on properly disputed causes of action, but no distinction was made on the Register. Judgments settled otherwise than through the Court may appear, unless 'Satisfaction' was entered up within the fourteen days allowed for that purpose. These printed extracts include occasional notes giving more detail about certain cases, and also list Satisfactions entered on the Register.

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County Court Judgments: Staffordshire
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