Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Burchard Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'burchard'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 13 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Buy all
Get all 13 records to view, to save and print for £68.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Charter Rolls (1050-1326)
This abstract of the surviving charter rolls for 1300 to 1326, in the reigns of kings Edward I and II, was prepared by C. G. Crump and A. E. Stamp and published in 1908. The charter rolls not only recorded royal grants of lands, liberties and offices, but also enabled landowners to have their existing charters, their deeds of title, registered by the process of inspeximus and confirmation. After the Statute of Mortmain of 1279, this was of particular importance to religious houses, now greatly restricted in their ability to receive new donations of land, and anxious to prove title to their ancient property. Consequently, many charters of great age were copied onto the charter rolls.

BURCHARD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Charter Rolls
 (1050-1326)
Essex Feet of Fines: Michaelmas 44-45 Elizabeth (1602)
Abstracts of Essex pedes finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land.

BURCHARD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Essex Feet of Fines: Michaelmas 44-45 Elizabeth
 (1602)
English passengers to New England (1632-1637)
Samuel G. Drake searched British archives from 1858 to 1860 for lists of passengers sent from England to New England, publishing the results in 1860 in Boston, Massachusetts. Adult emigrants transported to New England in the period 1632 to 1637 had to take oaths of allegiance and religious conformity, certified by parish priest, mayor or justices, and these certificates form the core of this book, but it also includes a list of 'Scotch Prisoners sent to Massachusetts in 1652, by Order of the English Government', and various other passenger lists and documents, dating as late as 1671. The early lists included the children, and normally gave the full name and age of each person. This is the index to the passengers.

BURCHARD. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
English passengers to New England
 (1632-1637)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

BURCHARD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1752)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 27 April to 31 December 1752.

BURCHARD. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Masters and Apprentices
 (1752)
Traders and Merchants in London (1791)
The Universal British Directory was published in five volumes, starting in 1791. The professions included in the London section are very diverse: the addresses are mostly from central London. Some are marked 'F. M.', meaning Freeholder of Middlesex.

BURCHARD. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Traders and Merchants in London
 (1791)
Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by marriage.

BURCHARD. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage
 (1392-1800)
Bankrupts' Assignees (1827)
Assignees of bankrupts' estates (usually principal creditors and/or close relatives of the bankrupt)

BURCHARD. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Bankrupts' Assignees
 (1827)
Bankruptcy information (1836)
Abstract of the circumstances causing a bankruptcy in England and Wales: assets, liabilities &c.

BURCHARD. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Bankruptcy information
 (1836)
National ArchivesMerchant Seamen (1835-1844)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the original register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen's (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. In this volume the register is restarted from 1840 onwards, with the mariner's previous number (if any) being entered in the column after his birthplace. In the event of it becoming known that a man had died during the course of a voyage, that information is written across the remaining empty columns. This volume (BT 112/10) covers mariners whose surnames start with Bu and By (and McBu and McBy).

BURCHARD. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Merchant Seamen
 (1835-1844)
1 | 2Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.