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Collyns Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'collyns'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 104 records (displaying 21 to 30): 

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London Inquisitions Post Mortem (1577-1603)
Full and complete abstracts of inquisitions post mortem for the City of London in this period. These are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown. The precise date of death of the deceased and the age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c. This abstract also includes a handful of earlier items omitted from previous volumes.

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London Inquisitions Post Mortem
 (1577-1603)
Cheshire gentry and their ancestors (1580-1613)
Richard St George, Norroy King of Arms, and Henry St George, Bluemaster Pursuivant of Arms, of the College of Arms, conducted a heraldic visitation of Cheshire in 1612 and 1613, recording pedigrees of gentlemen claiming the right to bear coats of arms. A copy of their visitation was elaborated by the addition of other Cheshire pedigrees in Harleian Manuscript 1535: and this manuscript was edited by sir George J. Armytage and John Paul Rylands for publication by the Harleian Society in 1909. It has a large number of pedigrees of Cheshire gentry, with a few brief abstracts from early documents; and the pedigrees of some offshoots from old Cheshire stocks which had taken root in other counties. The pedigrees largely relate to the period back from 1613 to the previous visitation of 1580, but there is also some older material, particularly back into the 15th century. In most cases each pedigree is prefixed by a heraldic description of the coat of arms. The printed volume also includes (pages 1 to 4) a list of Cheshire men who disclaimed the right to bear a coat of arms at the 1613 visitation, taken from Harleian Manuscript 1070.

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Cheshire gentry and their ancestors
 (1580-1613)
Official Papers (1623)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes some material from previous years, as early as 1603.

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Official Papers
 (1623)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1625-1626)
The Privy Council of Charles I was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1625-1626)
Wandsworth Burials (1628)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.

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Wandsworth Burials
 (1628)
Wiltshire freeholders (1625-1645)
Inquisitions post mortem were held after the death of freeholders who held their estates in capite or in chief, i. e., directly from the crown. The inquisition, held by the royal escheator upon the oath of jurors from the county who were also normally freeholders, recorded what estates the deceased had held, by what tenure, what they were worth, the date of death, who was the next heir, and whether the heir was of age. The sample scan shows an unusually brief inquisition: these abstracts usually run to two or three pages of print.

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Wiltshire freeholders
 (1625-1645)
Besiegers of Colchester (1648)
The siege of Colchester was one of the most severe of the Civil War, and lasted from 14 June to 28 August 1648. Kent and Essex Royalists on their way into Norfolk and Suffolk turned aside into Colchester, hoping to get recruits there. Fairfax pursued from his headquarters in London, and when on 12 June he appeared with 5,000 men they were obliged to make hasty preparations for defence. The town was ill-fitted to stand a siege, and the 4,000 Royalist troops were most of them newly levied and ill-armed, but after a repulse on 14 June 14, Fairfax realized that a long siege was inevitable, and busied himself with raising forts to completely isolate the town. On 2 July the work of circumvallation was finished, and though meeting with fierce resistance, Fairfax gained post after post. Early in August famine added to the misery of the besieged, and the citizens began to clamour for surrender. On 19 August, Norwich, the Royalist leader, asked for terms; negotiations went on for some days, and finally on 28 August, Fairfax occupied the town. Three of the Royalist leaders were shot, and the soldiers were sent to labour in the West Indies, or to enforced military service under the Venetian Republic. The townsmen were made to pay a heavy fine. These accounts list disbursements to workmen digging the fortifications and to artificers, soldiers and officers involved in the siege. The total sum paid was about 1,695.

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Besiegers of Colchester
 (1648)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1619-1657)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Sessions Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county.

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1619-1657)
Irish petitions, memoranda and correspondence (1606-1663)
John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, in three volumes; Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work was completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley, who also produced a fourth volume, published in 1947, by which time the manuscripts themselves had gone to the Henry E. Huntington Library at San Marino in California. This volume covers nine categories of the records, of which much, but not all, relates to Ireland: Correspondence of sir John Davies (Solicitor-General for Ireland 1603-1606 and Attorney-General for Ireland 1606-1619) (pages 1-17); Warrants, Petitions, &c., relating to Ireland, 1604-1618 and 1634 (18-54); Correspondence of John Bramhall (Bishop of Derry 1634-1660 and Archbishop of Armagh 1660-1663) (55-136); Petitions, Orders and Miscellaneius Documents mostly relating to the Episcopate of John Bramhall (137-152); Other Miscellaneous Irish Papers (153-185), including a particularly valuable Survey of the Undertakers and Servitors planted in Ulster between 2 February and 25 April 1613 (159-182); Royal Letters and Letters from the Lords of the Council, &c., mostly to the Earls of Huntingdon as Lords Lieutenant of Leicestershire and Rutland, and other Documents relating chiefly to County Affairs (186-221); Notes on Speeches and Proceedings in the House of Lords 1610-1621 and 1670-1695 (222-324); Later Miscellaneous and Additional Papers (325-358); and Letters and Papers of the Graham Family, chiefly relating to the disposal of the estates and titles of the Earls of Airth and Menteith and proposals for the marriage of Helen, daughter of sir James Graham.

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Irish petitions, memoranda and correspondence
 (1606-1663)
Inhabitants of Reading in Berkshire (1550-1667)
The borough of Reading in Berkshire comprised three ancient parishes - St Giles, St Lawrence and St Mary. The churchwardens' accounts of Reading St Mary from 1550 to 1667 were transcribed by Francis N. A. Garry and A. G. Garry and published in 1893. The accounts, usually signed off by the two churchwardens and two surveyors of the highways for the year, listed the income and expenditure of the church. Income included annual payments for seats in the pews; rents from church property; fees for the use of the pall and for tolling the knell (knill) at funerals, and for opening graves; and sums received for 'gatherings', i. e. money gathered from communicants at Easter, Hocktide, Mayday, Hallowmas, Christmas and Whit. Expenditure was largely on maintaining the church fabric, and paying the minor officials - most of the names found on this side of the account are of local workmen busy with repairs.

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Inhabitants of Reading in Berkshire
 (1550-1667)
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