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Stoddert Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'stoddert'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 6 records (displaying 1 to 6): 

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Inhabitants of Cambridge (1504-1635)
Cambridge comprised fourteen ancient parishes, plus the university (which was extra-parochial), in the diocese of Ely. The church of St Mary the Great (as opposed to St Mary the Less) in the Market Place (juxta forum) has churchwardens' accounts surviving from 1504 onwards. Those from 1504 to 1635 were transcribed by J. E. Foster for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society and published in 1905. The two churchwardens were chosen annually: the previous year's churchwardens each chose another parishioner: those two then each chose three other parishioners: the resulting eight then chose the new year's churchwardens, the wardens of the Light of the Rood, and the wardens of the Mass of Jesus. Auditors were also chosen, usually out of the eight, to examine all the wardens' accounts at the end of the year. The churchwardens' accounts are largely concerned with the costs of repair of the church and its furnishings, and include the names of tradesmen and workmen. Each Easter a rate called Easter money was raised was raised from all householders in the parish, and additional rates are occasionally levied for unusual expenses, such as steeple reconstruction. These 'Easter book' lists give a complete list of householders for the parish, excepting the poor. The church's income also included the rents from some houses in the parish, and the names of the tenants appear. The offices of the Light of the Rood and the Mass of Jesus were abolished during the Reformation. The accounts of the Light of the Rood, i. e., for candles burnt before the crucifix, often include a list of sums received for funerary diriges (dirges) for the year, from which the year of death of the more prosperous parishioners can be traced in this early period.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1504-1635)
Royalist delinquents in county Durham and Northumberland, their successors, tenants, debtors and creditors (1648-1660)
King Charles I was executed 30 January 1649, the kingship was abolished and government by a Council of State was established 14 February 1649. Oliver Cromwell became Lord Protector 16 December 1653; died 3 September 1658; and was succeeded by his son Richard, who abdicated 24 May 1659. Charles II was established on the throne 29 May 1660. From 1648 to 1660 parliament sequestrated royalists' estates, restoring many by a process of heavy fines called compounding; this was administered by the Committee for Compounding, working through county committees. These raised considerable amounts of money, money which was vitally necessary for maintaining the parliamentary army's campaigns to subdue opposition in the three kingdoms - England, Scotland and Ireland. The raising and delivery of these monies was the responsibility of the Committee for Advance of Money (C. A. M.). The records of these committees were detailed and extensive, amounting to about 300 volumes, and were calendared for the Public Record Office by Mary Anne Everett Green. Abstracts of the county Durham and Northumberland entries were collated by Richard Welford with a manuscript transcript of the proceedings of the parliamentary commissioners in county Durham surviving in Durham cathedral library, and published by the Surtees Society in 1905. The persons named in these abstracts are not only the delinquents themselves, and those who succeeded them in their estates, but tenants, debtors and creditors, and local constables and officials of the committees.

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Royalist delinquents in county Durham and Northumberland, their successors, tenants, debtors and creditors
 (1648-1660)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1763)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/54

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Apprentices registered in Newcastle-upon-Tyne
 (1763)
Stockton-on-Tees Voters: Thornaby Polling District (1868)
This poll book for the First Parliamentary Election for the Borough of Stockton-on-Tees lists the voters alphabetically by polling district, with full name (surname first) and address. In the right-hand column D represents the Liberal candidate, Joseph Dodds, Esq., and V the Conservative, Lord Ernest Vane Tempest. The three polling districts were Norton, Stockton (including so much of Linthorpe as lay within the parliamentary borough of Stockton), and Thurnaby. At the end of each district the handful of lodger voters are listed separately.

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Stockton-on-Tees Voters: Thornaby Polling District
 (1868)
Anglicans in Salford and their children (1889)
The parish magazine of the populous Anglican parish of Salford St Matthias contains not only parish news and notices, but also lists of Baptisms, Marriages and Deaths. The parish was divided into 38 districts for the Christian Workers' Association, and the districts are listed, with the names of the streets, and the names and addresses of the district visitors. The Church Decoration and Window Accounts include a long list of donations by parishioners. The Sunday School prize lists give the names of many of the children, arranged by class; and there is a long prize list for the year for boys and girls attending the Anglican day and infants schools at Broughton Road and Silk Street. The parish comprised Broughton Road, St Simon's Street, Back Sandon Street, Wood's Buildings, Sandford Street, Watkin Street, Harriet Street, Brougham Street, Wheat Hill Street, Rose Street, Pink Street, Silk Street and Back Silk Street, Adelphi Street, Flax Street, Ann Street, Diamond Street, Lester Street, Cliburn Street, Sagar Street and Back Sagar Street, Pine Street, Matthew's Buildings, Blackburn Street, Blackburn Place, North James Henry Street, Pea Street, Cannon Court, Arlington Street and Back Arlington Street, Silk Place, Russell Street, Artillery Street, Gun Street, Bow Street, Chestnut Street, North Charles Street, Peter Street, North Thomas Street, Ogden Street, North Cable Street, Cannon Street, Rockville Street, Barnet Street, Brook Street, McIntyre Square, Burton Street, Devine Street, Methvin Street, Skellorn Street, North Hill Street, Briggs Street, Simms Street, Allendale Street, Francis Terrace, Marshall Terrace, Albert Terrace, North George Street, Alexander Street, Albert Street, Marshall Street, Mount Street, Mayers Street, Peru Street, Reservoir Terrace, John Street, Richmond Terrace, Richmond Row and Back Richmond Row, Ford Lane, Ford Land View, Richmond Hill, High Holborn Terrace, Perseverance Place, Williamson Street, Willow Street, and Salford Street.

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Anglicans in Salford and their children
 (1889)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1900)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1880, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'. This appendix to the list was issued in about 1900.

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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1900)

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