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Stobbart Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'stobbart'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 38 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham (1626-1638)
Sexual and religious behaviour, marriage and probate were under the purview of the ecclesiastical courts in England at this period, exercised through the individual dioceses and archdeaconries. The diocese of Durham included the whole of county Durham, Northumberland (except for Hexhamshire) and Alston in Cumberland. The High Commission Court dealt with cases from the whole diocese, and a book of court acts from 1628 to 1639, and another of depositions from 1626 to 1638, survived in the dean and chapter library, were edited by W. Hylton Dyer Longstaffe, and published by the Surtees Society in 1858. This is not a complete abstract of the record: there are hundreds of cases for contempt of the ordinary jurisdiction, of which only a few were selected as examples 'in consequence of the rank of the persons proceeded against or other contents of interest'. However, all cases in which the nature of the offence occurs are traced from start to finish, but omitting much of the proceedings in between. The names and ages of all the deponents are recorded.

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Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham
 (1626-1638)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1726)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 3 January to 31 December 1726

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1726)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1738)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 7 October 1738

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1738)
Subscribers to Thomas Sanderson's Original Poems: Durham (1800)
Thomas Sanderson's 'Original Poems' was published in Carlisle in 1800. The list of subscribers is arranged geographically: London; Tunbridge; Gloucester; Epsom; Exeter; Nottingham; Northampton; Cambridge; Oxford; Hertford; Carlisle; Penrith; Longtown; Hesket Newmarket; Wigton; Keswick; Durham; Newcastle; Maryport; Dublin; Edinburgh; York; and Liverpool, each including surrounding areas; Madras; and the West Indies. Where more than one copy was ordered, the number is given after the subscriber's name. At the foot of the list is this note: 'The Author cannot take leave of his friends without warmly thanking them for the generous encouragement they have given to the subscription. Their benevolence does them the more honour, as it was called forth in the favour of a Person who cannot make them any better return than mere professions of gratitude.'

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Subscribers to Thomas Sanderson's Original Poems: Durham
 (1800)
Freeholders voting in Tindale ward, Northumberland (1826)
An election to choose two knights of the shire to represent Northumberland took place at Alnwick from 20 June to 6 July 1826. The candidates were Henry Thomas Liddell (L), Matthew Bell (B), Thomas Wentworth Beaumont (Bt) and Viscount Howick (H). The franchise included all freeholders of property worth 40 shillings or more per annum: each had two votes, but could plump for a single candidate. This poll book was published in 1827 and lists the voters from each ward: the freeholder's full name (surname first), residence, and the nature of the freehold (such as 'house at Corbridge'). The votes are shown in the right hand columns, with plumpers shown by a dagger. Tindale ward included Allendale, Bellingham, Haltwhistle, Hexham and the surrounding countryside.

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Freeholders voting in Tindale ward, Northumberland
 (1826)
South County Durham Poll Book: Darlington District (1832)
A poll for two Knights of the Shire to represent in Parliament the Southern Division of the county palatine of Durham was taken on 21 and 22 December 1832. This poll book sets out all the electors by polling district (Barnard Castle, Bishop Auckland, Darlington, Middleton-in-Teesdale, Sedgefield, Stanhope and Stockton) and gives registered number; full name (surname first); place of abode; nature of qualification (such as House as occupier, Land as occupier, Copyhold Property, &c.); and the name of the parish, township or place where the property is situate. The votes are set out in the right-hand columns, under P. (for Joseph Pearse, jun., esq.), B. (John Bowes, esq.), and S. (Robert Duncombe Shafto, esq.), the three candidates. A voter could choose two candidates, in which case a dash is put in each of the two appropriate columns, or plump for just one - where a star is placed in that candidate's column. This was the first election after the Reform Act, which extended the franchise in the counties to all adult men possessing freehold worth 40s a year or more, or copyhold or long leasehold of 10 or more, or being tenants or short leaseholders of 50 or more.

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South County Durham Poll Book: Darlington District
 (1832)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Inhabitants of Durham (1847)
Francis White's directory of the city and suburbs of Durham, published in March 1847

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Inhabitants of Durham (1847)
Inhabitants of Keighley, Yorkshire (1853)
William White's directory lists traders, farmers and private residents in the area.

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Inhabitants of Keighley, Yorkshire
 (1853)
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