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Stint Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'stint'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 23 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Rich English Pilgrims in Rome (1507)
Registers of English pilgrims staying in Rome, preserved among the archives of the English College, were extracted by W. C. Trevelyan and communicated to the Rev. John Hodgson, who published them in 1838. Two separate lists were maintained - of the rich and nobles, and of the poor. Both lists give date, full name, and diocese of origin in England and Wales.

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Rich English Pilgrims in Rome
 (1507)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Wandsworth Burials (1624)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. On the other hand, the Wandsworth burial registers of the early 17th century are particularly important because they contain the names of adults born well back into the 16th century, a period for which the parish registers no longer survive. Moreover, the burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population.

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Wandsworth Burials
 (1624)
English passengers to New England (1632-1637)
Samuel G. Drake searched British archives from 1858 to 1860 for lists of passengers sent from England to New England, publishing the results in 1860 in Boston, Massachusetts. Adult emigrants transported to New England in the period 1632 to 1637 had to take oaths of allegiance and religious conformity, certified by parish priest, mayor or justices, and these certificates form the core of this book, but it also includes a list of 'Scotch Prisoners sent to Massachusetts in 1652, by Order of the English Government', and various other passenger lists and documents, dating as late as 1671. The early lists included the children, and normally gave the full name and age of each person. This is the index to the passengers.

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English passengers to New England
 (1632-1637)
Besiegers of Colchester (1648)
The siege of Colchester was one of the most severe of the Civil War, and lasted from 14 June to 28 August 1648. Kent and Essex Royalists on their way into Norfolk and Suffolk turned aside into Colchester, hoping to get recruits there. Fairfax pursued from his headquarters in London, and when on 12 June he appeared with 5,000 men they were obliged to make hasty preparations for defence. The town was ill-fitted to stand a siege, and the 4,000 Royalist troops were most of them newly levied and ill-armed, but after a repulse on 14 June 14, Fairfax realized that a long siege was inevitable, and busied himself with raising forts to completely isolate the town. On 2 July the work of circumvallation was finished, and though meeting with fierce resistance, Fairfax gained post after post. Early in August famine added to the misery of the besieged, and the citizens began to clamour for surrender. On 19 August, Norwich, the Royalist leader, asked for terms; negotiations went on for some days, and finally on 28 August, Fairfax occupied the town. Three of the Royalist leaders were shot, and the soldiers were sent to labour in the West Indies, or to enforced military service under the Venetian Republic. The townsmen were made to pay a heavy fine. These accounts list disbursements to workmen digging the fortifications and to artificers, soldiers and officers involved in the siege. The total sum paid was about 1,695.

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Besiegers of Colchester
 (1648)
Wandsworth Bridegrooms (1649)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. Prior to 1662 it was not normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.

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Wandsworth Bridegrooms
 (1649)
PCC Probate Abstracts (1652-1653)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator

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PCC Probate Abstracts
 (1652-1653)
London Marriage Allegations (1611-1660)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court was extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place. For the later years Colonel Chester merely picked out items that he thought were of interest, and his selections continue as late as 1828, but the bulk of the licences abstracted here are from the 17th century.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1611-1660)
Surrey Sessions (1659-1661)
Surrey Sessions Rolls and Order Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the Order Books from Midsummer 1659 to Midsummer 1661, inclusive, and the Sessions Rolls for Easter and Midsummer 1661.

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Surrey Sessions
 (1659-1661)
Surrey Sessions (1661-1663)
Surrey Sessions Rolls and Order Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the Order Books from October 1661 to January 1663, inclusive, and the Sessions Rolls for October 1661, January 1662, April 1662, July 1662, October 1662 and January 1663.

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Surrey Sessions
 (1661-1663)
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