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Stahlschmidt Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'stahlschmidt'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 21 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Bankrupts (1786-1806)
William Smith's abstracts of bankrupts, dividends and certificates for England and Wales from 1786 to June 1806. Bankruptcy causes abrupt changes in people's lives, and is often the reason for someone appearing suddenly in a different location or in a different occupation.

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Bankrupts
 (1786-1806)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1829)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1829)
Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London (1834)
The public prints of December 1834 carried this loyal address to king William IV of merchants, bankers, shipowners, traders and others connected with the city of London, requesting 'permission at the present juncture to address your Majesty for the purpose of renewing the expression of our dutiful and loyal attachment to your Majesty’s person and crown. Deeply sensible of the practical blessings we have hitherto enjoyed under our wisely mixed constitution of King, Lords, and Commons, and feeling that the free and legitimate exercise of the Royal prerogative forms an integral part of that constitution (as essential to the maintenance of our own liberties as to the power and dignity of the Throne), we beg humbly to assure your Majesty of our determination steadfastly to uphold the same by every means in our power. 'Feeling, in common with all classes of your Majesty’s subjects, the deep importance of applying to all real abuses, wherever they may be found, a wholesome and timely correction, and of effecting in our excellent institutions every improvement of which careful examination and experience may prove them to be susceptible, we desire further dutifully to express our entire confidence that these useful purposes will ever occupy your Majesty’s paternal care. Nor can we permit ourselves to believe that the importance of these objects will be less apparent to those to whom the powers of government have been recently intrusted.' Full names are given (or surname with initials), and address. Over 5000 subscribed.

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Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London
 (1834)
British Army administration (1841)
The British Army of queen Victoria's time had a very extensive system of administration. The Royal Kalendar lists officials, both uniformed and civilian, from the Commander-in-Chief's Office at Horse Guards, the Adjutant-General's Office, the Recruiting Department, the Quarter Master-General's Office, the Judge Advocate-General's Office, the Consolidated Board of General Officers, the Cinque Ports, the War Office, the Office of her Majesty's Paymaster-General, the Ordnance Department (including the out-ports and stations at Woolwich, Chatham, Dover, Portsmouth, Devonport, Guernsey, Jersey, Chester and Liverpool, Carlisle, Hull, Landguard Fort and Harwich, Alderne, the gunpowder manufactory at Waltham Abbey, the gunpowder magazines at Hyde Park, Purfleet, Gravesend and Tilbury, Upnor Castle, Priddy's Hard, Tipner Point, Keyham Point, Marchwood and Tynemouth; at Edinburgh, Stirling Castle and Fort George in Scotland; in Antigua, Australia, the Bahamas, Barbadoes, Berbice, Bermuda, Cape of Good Hope, Colombo, Corfu, Demerara, Dominica, Gibraltar, Grenada, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Jamaica, Isle aux Nois, Kingston (Upper Canada), Malta, Mauritius, Montreal, New Brunswick, Prince Edward's Island, Quebec, Rideau Canal, Ottawa Canals, St Christopher, St Helena, St Lucia, St Vincent's, Santa Maura, Sierra Leone, Toronto, Tobago, Trincomalee, Trinidad and Zante), the Royal Military College at Sandhurst, the Royal Hospital at Chelsea, the Royal Military Asylum at Chelsea and Southampton, Army Agents, General Agents for the Recruiting Service, and Army general staff and governors of forts and garrisons in Ireland.

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British Army administration
 (1841)
Post office clerks and officials (1841)
The General Post Office, at St Martin's-le-Grand, was the headquarters for the English postal system. Its departments included the Money Order Office, Ship Letter Office, Dead and Returned Letter Office and the Inland Letter Office. The Two Penny Post was a separate establishment. The officials, clerks, assistants and sorters are listed in the Royal Kalendar.

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Post office clerks and officials
 (1841)
National ArchivesPersons of standing recommending London police recruits (1830-1842)
The Metropolitan Police Register of Joiners (MEPO 333/4) lists policemen joining the force through to 31 December 1842 (to warrant number 19892). The register is alphabetical, in so far as the recruits are listed chronologically grouped under first letter of surname. It is evidently a continuation of a similar earlier register, not closed until its alphabetical sections were filled: consequently, there are no entries in this register for the initial letters N, O, Q, U, V, X, Y or Z; and the sections of this register start at different dates - A 18 April 1840 (warrant number 16894); B 11 December 1830 (5570); C 7 September 1830 (4988); D 27 May 1833 (8445); E 15 December 1838 (14476); F 30 March 1832 (7372); G 1 December 1835 (11,184); H 25 April 1832 (7457); I and J 13 February 1837 (12449); K 2 January 1838 (13457); L 3 October 1834 (9905); M 15 November 1832 (7999); P 4 October 1831 (6869); R 4 September 1837 (13021); S 30 March 1835 (10366); T 6 April 1840 (16829); W 30 December 1833 (9096). The register gives Date of Appointment, Name, Number of Warrant, Cause of Removal from Force (resigned, dismissed, promoted or died), and Date of Removal. Those recruits not formerly in the police, the army, or some government department, were required to provide (normally) at least two letters of recommendation from persons of standing, and details of these are entered on the facing pages: the names in these are indexed here (the police recruits are indexed separately and not included here). Recruits transferred from other forces or rejoining the force did not normally need recommendations - in the latter case, former warrant numbers are given - but some recommendations are from police inspectors, even other constables. Recruits coming from the army sometimes have general military certificates of good conduct, but most often have a letter from their former commanding officer; recruits recommended by government departments (most often the Home Office) similarly have letters from the head of department. But the great majority of the names and addresses in these pages are of respectable citizens having some sort of personal acquaintance with the recruit. Where more than two recommendations were provided, the clerk would only record one or two, with the words 'and others'. Tradesmen are sometimes identified as such by their occupations; there are some gentry. Although the great bulk of these names are from London and the home counties, a scattering are from further afield throughout Britain and Ireland.

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Persons of standing recommending London police recruits
 (1830-1842)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1842)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1842)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1850)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1850, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.

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Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1850)
Bankrupts in England and Wales (1851)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. The initial entry in this sequence gives the name of the bankrupt (surname first, in capitals), the date gazetted, address and trade (often with the phrase dlr. and ch., meaning dealer and chapman); the dates and times and courts of the official processes of surrender; the surname of the official commissioner (Com.); the surname of the official assignee; and the names and addresses of the solicitors; the date of the fiat; and whether on the bankrupt's own petition, or at the demand of petitioning creditors, whose names, trades and addresses are given. In subsequent entries the bankrupt is often merely referred to by name and trade. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1851, which may or may not include the detailed first entry for any particular individual.

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Bankrupts in England and Wales
 (1851)
Bankrupts in England and Wales petitioning for discharge (1851)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. Towards the end of the process there was a Meeting for Allowance of Certificates, where the bankrupt applied for a certificate of discharge. This meeting sometimes took place many years after the bankruptcy procedure started: the details given are the year originally gazetted, name (surname first), address, and trade; and the date and time of the hearing. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1851.

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Bankrupts in England and Wales petitioning for discharge
 (1851)
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