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Macmanus Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'macmanus'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 22 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1471-1484)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of pope Sixtus IV. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Many of the names in the text were clearly a puzzle to the scribes in Rome, and spelling of British and Irish placenames and surnames is chaotic. Sixtus IV was consecrated and crowned 25 August 1471 (the day from which his pontificate is dated) and died at Rome 12 August 1484. The extracts were made by J. A. Twemlow from Vatican Regesta dxlvi to dclxxxi and Lateran Regesta dccxiii to dcccxxxviii, and published in 1955. Not all the Lateran registers survive from this pontificate, but were still in existence in the 18th century, when indexes were compiled giving rubricelle, or brief summaries of the papal bulls; nor, indeed, have all these indexes now survived, but Twemlow added an appendix listing all the rubricelle relating to the British Isles extant for the reign of Sixtus IV.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1471-1484)
Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland (1675-1685)
This correspondence deals with a large variety of personal and public affairs in Ireland and England. The collection also includes lists of Irish wool licences and licencees, 1678 to 1681

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Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland
 (1675-1685)
Official Papers (1694-1695)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Here we have the period from January 1694 to June 1695.

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Official Papers
 (1694-1695)
Army Pensions (1715-1716)
Abstract of the Treasury declared accounts for the Army, Guards and Garrisons and Land Forces, 17 October 1715 to 24 December 1716: E 351/103. The names of officers receiving pensions and allowances.

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Army Pensions
 (1715-1716)
Proceedings at the Old Bailey (1785)
The Daily Universal Register for February 1785 reported on cases tried at the Old Bailey. Persons mentioned include not only the accused, but also victims, police officers, witnesses, &c.

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Proceedings at the Old Bailey
 (1785)
Officers and officials of the London police courts (1805)
Clerks, justices and other officers of the Public Office at Bow Street, and the Police Offices at Hatton Garden, Marlborough Street, Queen's Square, Worship Street, Lambert Street, Union Hall, Shadwell and Thames (Wapping) are listed in Holden's Triennial Directory of 1805 to 1807.

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Officers and officials of the London police courts
 (1805)
Teachers in Donegal Deserving of Encouragement (1826)
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to 'Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors' Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement'. 38 such teachers were identified in county Donegal in 1826, and are listed in the society's report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

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Teachers in Donegal Deserving of Encouragement
 (1826)
Bankrupts (1858)
Bankruptcy notices for England and Wales: bankruptcy often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Bankrupts
 (1858)
Civil Service Appointments (1861)
The Civil Service Commission published an annual list of all persons who had obtained certificates of qualification for appointment in the various public departments. The list gives full name (surname first); department (such as Post Office, or Inland Revenue); situation (such as Letter-carrier, or Clerk); and date of certificate. Candidates whose names are preceded by a dagger obtained appointments as the result of competition; a double dagger indicates open competition. Those whose names are preceded by an asterisk obtained honorary additions to their certificates either for proficiency in extra subjects chosen by themselves, or for marked proficiency in the prescribed subjects. Then follows a further list of these candidates who had obtained Honorary Additions to their Certificates in this way: giving name (surname and initials); position in the service (department and situation); subjects for which honorary additions were made; and 'extent of knowledge displayed' (such as Creditable, Fair, or Very Creditable). 1 January to 31 December 1861.

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Civil Service Appointments
 (1861)
Boys entering Marlborough College (1900)
The public school at Marlborough in Wiltshire was founded in 1843. In 1952 this, 9th, edition of the college register was published, being a revision by L. Warwick James of the 8th edition (of 1936): but for the years before 1936 it does not merely repeat the 8th edition, because Warwick James was able to correct the 19th-century entries with information from newly-discovered letters and books from 1843 to 1853, and the school lists from 1844 onwards. The roll is arranged by year, and within each year by term of entrance, and then alphabetically by surname within each term. Each boy is assigned a number within the year: then his name is given, surname first, and, in brackets, his house. The houses within the college were called B1, B2, B3, C1, C2 and C3, and the Lower School (L Sch); the out college houses were Preshute, Priory, Cotton, Hermitage, Littlefield, Barton Hill, Summerfield and Upcot. Then there is given the boy's father's name (surname and initials) and address (at entrance), the boy's date of birth (b) and month of leaving (l). Where the boy represented the school at Rugby football (XV) or cricket (XI), in the rifle corps (VIII, or RC XI), that is indicated. There is a brief summary of achievements in later life, and, where known, and date of death or (in italics) address as in 1952.

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Boys entering Marlborough College
 (1900)
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