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Gruzelier Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'gruzelier'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 19 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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National ArchivesApprentices registered in Devon (1791)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/66

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Apprentices registered in Devon
 (1791)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Devon (1795)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/67

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Apprentices registered in Devon
 (1795)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Devon (1800)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/69

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Masters of apprentices registered in Devon
 (1800)
Bankrupts (1806-1807)
William Smith's abstracts of bankruptcies for England and Wales from July 1806 to December 1807. Bankruptcy causes abrupt changes in people's lives, and is often the reason for someone appearing suddenly in a different location or in a different occupation.

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Bankrupts
 (1806-1807)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
Officials and officers of the Admiralty, dockyards, and maritime institutions (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists officials and clerks of the Admiralty at Charing Cross, including those of the Admiralty Court; then there are the various civil departments of the Admiralty at Somerset Place: the Surveyor's Department, the Accountant-General's Department, Storekeeper-General's Department, Department of the Comptroller for Victualling and Transport Services; Department of the Physician-General; the Dockyards at Deptford, Woolwich, Chatham, Sheerness, Deal, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Pembroke, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Malta, Cape of Good Hope, Trincomalee and Bermuda; the Victualling Officers at the outports of Deptford, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Sheerness and Cork; the Royal Naval Hospitals at Haslar, Plymouth, Malta, Jamaica and Bermuda; the Royal Marines' Navy and Marine Agents in London; the Royal Hospital at Greenwich; Royal Hospital School; Corporation of the Trinity House; Corporation for Sick and Maimed Seamen in the Merchants Service; Royal Naval Benevolent Society; Naval Medical Supplemental Fund; Marine Society; London Maritime Institution; Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck; and the Royal Naval School for Educating the Sons of the Less Affluent Naval and Marine Officers at the Least Possible Expense.

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Officials and officers of the Admiralty, dockyards, and maritime institutions
 (1841)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1843)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders, in England and Wales

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1843)
Railway Subscription Contracts (1845)
21,386,703 6s 4d was promised by about 10,000 subscribers of less than 2,000 per contract to the nearly 200 railway bills deposited in the Private Bill Office during the Session of Parliament for 1845. This alphabetical list gives the full names of the subscribers (surname first), description (i. e., occupation), place of abode, a numerical reference to the title of the railway, the amount subscribed to each, and total. There is a separate key to the titles of the railways.

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Railway Subscription Contracts
 (1845)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Megaera in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Megaera, a 6-gun screw steamer frigate, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Megaera in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. St Jean D'Acre in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship St Jean D'Acre, a 101-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. St Jean D'Acre in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
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