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Wastneys Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'wastneys'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1340-1349)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 13th to the 23rd years of king Edward III.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1340-1349)
Fine Rolls (1369-1377)
The fine rolls of the 43rd to 51st years of the reign of king Edward III record part of the government administration in England, with orders sent out day by day to individual officers, and commitment of particular responsibilities and duties. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Fine Rolls
 (1369-1377)
Close Rolls (1429-1435)
The close rolls of the 8th to 13th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France. Also included is the Exchange Roll of 1424 to 1434, of licences to transmit sums of money out of the realm.

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Close Rolls
 (1429-1435)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1577-1700)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1588 to 1754 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1577-1700)
Official Papers (1700-1702)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. Includes lists of passes to travel abroad. This abstract covers the period from 1 April 1700 to 4 March 1702, with an appendix of items dating back as early as 1689.

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Official Papers
 (1700-1702)
State Papers Domestic (1702-1703)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State, as well as other miscellaneous records. 1 March 1702 to 31 May 1703. The calendar was prepared by Robert Pentland Mahaffy, with certain classes of document extracted and placed in separate appendices (called Tables): I, caveats; II, church and university appointments, &c.; III, commissions, warrants for commissions, notes of commissions and notes of warrants for commissions in the English army for 1702; IV, lord lieutenants and deputy lieutenants; V, Irish warrants; VI, weekly lists of ships of the Home Fleet with their stations and orders; VII, passes, notes of passes, post warrants and licences of absence; VIII, orders on petitions; IX, Scottish warrants and commissions; and X, miscellaneous royal warrants (to the Attorney or Solicitor General; in criminal cases; diplomatic; military warrants; miscellaneous warrants; secretary's warrants, allowance of bills, &c.; and notes of warrants for the appointment of almsmen). The source material in the Public Record Office that he drew on in making this compilation is referenced throughout, and is from the State Papers Domestic (and Military, Naval, Signet Office, Various, and Letter Books and Entry Books), State Papers Scotland (Correspondence, Letter Books and Warrants), State Papers Ireland (and King's Letter Books), and State Papers Channel Islands.

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State Papers Domestic
 (1702-1703)
Gaoled Newspaper Vendors in Newcastle-upon-Tyne Town Gaol or House of Correction (1834-1835)
The 1815 Stamp Act increased the tax on newspapers to fourpence a copy. Many radical newspaper publishers and the booksellers and newsagents who sold their popular papers ignored the law, and were liable to suffer prosecution either by authority of the Stamp Office which regulated the tax or by a common informer. In 1836 the House of Commons ordered these returns to be made from each prison, giving details of the convictions that had been made under the Act. The returns are not entirely consistent from one gaol to another, but most give names, dates, and period of imprisonment.

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Gaoled Newspaper Vendors in Newcastle-upon-Tyne Town Gaol or House of Correction
 (1834-1835)
Electors for Conisbrough (1848)
On 14 and 15 December 1848 an election took place for a Knight of the Shire for the West Riding of Yorkshire in the House of Commons. The candidates were Edmund Denison and sir Culling Eardley Eardley, gaining 14,743 and 11,795 votes respectively. The county franchise at this period included freeholders of land worth 40s or more a year; 10 copyholders and long-leaseholders; and 50 short-leaseholders and tenants. This poll book was published in 1849. Former poll books had been compiled from the sheriff's returns; but as these were now transmitted to the Home Office immediately after an election, in this instance the polling was marked from the check-clerk's returns, carefully compared with the registers marked in the poll booths at the time of voting. The votes for the respective candidates are indicated by the numerals 1 (Denison) and 2 (Eardley). The omission of these numerals indicates that the elector did not vote. Many names which appear on the register of particular townships are completely omitted in this poll book: in all these cases, the same name will be found recorded in some other township, the elector having two or more qualifications. In such cases, his name only appears in the poll book in the actual township for which he chose to vote; or, if he did not vote at all, in that township for which he was qualified that lay closest to his actual residence. The townships are arranged alphabetically within polling district; and within each township the names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name, and the elector's residence is given. Many of the electors resided outside the township for which they were qualified - some in other counties. Moreover, at the end of each polling district there is a list of persons registered to poll in that district, from townships is other districts.

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Electors for Conisbrough
 (1848)
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