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Wanley Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'wanley'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 40 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1300-1309)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 29th year of the reign of king Edward I to the 3rd year of king Edward II.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1300-1309)
Middlesex Sessions (1603-1625)
Incidents from the Middlesex Sessions Books. These are abstracts of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record taken from the three volumes of Gaol Delivery Register, four volumes of Sessions of Peace Register and two volumes of Process Books of Indictments for the county of Middlesex from the reign of king James I. The references at the end of each item indicate the volume in question, the abbreviations being G. D. for Gaol Delivery, S. P. for Sessions of Peace, and S. O. T. for Session of Oyer and Terminer; occasionally preceded by S. for Special or G. for general, or followed by R. for Roll or Reg. for Register. It should be noted that, in the case of 'true bills' or indictments, the abstract starts with the date on which the offence took place, the date of the conviction &c. being at the end of the entry.

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Middlesex Sessions
 (1603-1625)
Purchasers of Bishops' Lands: Surrey (1647-1651)
16 November 1646 Parliament ordained the sale of all the lands and estates of the bishops and archbishops for the service of the Commonwealth. This account, printed in 1834, is a transcript from a manuscript presented to the British Museum by William Bray (Add. 9049). It gives in tabular form the details of the conveyances of the lands to private individuals, showing the name of the bishopric; the date of the conveyance; county; description of the lands; purchaser; and purchase money. A total of over 624,158 was raised: after the restoration of the monarchy these estates were returned to the Church, with compensation.

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Purchasers of Bishops' Lands: Surrey
 (1647-1651)
Purchasers of Bishops' Lands: Yorkshire (1647-1651)
16 November 1646 Parliament ordained the sale of all the lands and estates of the bishops and archbishops for the service of the Commonwealth. This account, printed in 1834, is a transcript from a manuscript presented to the British Museum by William Bray (Add. 9049). It gives in tabular form the details of the conveyances of the lands to private individuals, showing the name of the bishopric; the date of the conveyance; county; description of the lands; purchaser; and purchase money. A total of over 624,158 was raised: after the restoration of the monarchy these estates were returned to the Church, with compensation.

WANLEY. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Purchasers of Bishops' Lands: Yorkshire
 (1647-1651)
Leicester Hearth Tax (1664)
The Michaelmas 1664 hearth tax returns for the city of Leicester, transcribed by Henry Hartopp mainly from the original collectors' books in the Public Record Office (Exchequer Lay Subsidy county Leicester 251/4). The names are listed by ward, with the number of hearths. The latter part of the list for each ward consists of the names of those not chargeable by reason of poverty. Hartopp annotated the heading for each ward with a list of the streets comprised.

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Leicester Hearth Tax
 (1664)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1669)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

WANLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1669)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage. This index also includes marriage licence allegations for the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, 1558 to 1699.

WANLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1679)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1669-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

WANLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1669-1679)
Promoters of New England (1656-1686)
The Record Book of Meetings of the Corporation for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England (generally known as the New England Company) from 1656 to 1686 was edited by George Parker Winship for the Prince Society and published in 1920. The promoters of the venture were largely merchants of the city of London and their relatives, and as much of these minutes refers to the society's property around London as to the comings and goings of adventurers.

WANLEY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Promoters of New England
 (1656-1686)
Treasury and Customs Records (1685-1688)
Government accounts, with details of income and expenditure in Britain, America and the colonies

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Treasury and Customs Records
 (1685-1688)
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