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Swynesheved Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'swynesheved'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Norfolk Feet of Fines (1196-1307)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Norfolk. These abstracts were prepared by Walter Rye.

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Norfolk Feet of Fines
 (1196-1307)
Charter Rolls (1050-1326)
This abstract of the surviving charter rolls for 1300 to 1326, in the reigns of kings Edward I and II, was prepared by C. G. Crump and A. E. Stamp and published in 1908. The charter rolls not only recorded royal grants of lands, liberties and offices, but also enabled landowners to have their existing charters, their deeds of title, registered by the process of inspeximus and confirmation. After the Statute of Mortmain of 1279, this was of particular importance to religious houses, now greatly restricted in their ability to receive new donations of land, and anxious to prove title to their ancient property. Consequently, many charters of great age were copied onto the charter rolls.

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Charter Rolls
 (1050-1326)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1330-1339)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 3rd to the 13th years of king Edward III.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1330-1339)
Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire (1361-1370)
The register of bishop Louis de Charltone of Hereford, containing general diocesan business, but also including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire.

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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire
 (1361-1370)
Inhabitants of London (1352-1374)
Letter Book G of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1352-1374)
London, Essex and Hertfordshire clerks, clerics, monks and clergy (1361-1374)
Ordinations to first tonsure, acolytes, subdeacons, deacons and priests, from the register of bishop Simon de Sudbury of London. London diocese covered Middlesex, Essex and part of Hertfordshire; the ordinations also attracted many persons from distant dioceses bearing letters dimissory from their ordinaries, and these are duly noted in the text. Many of these clerks would not go on to obtain benefices and remain celibate. The lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests state the clerks' respective titles, i. e., give the names of the person or religious house undertaking to support them. Monks and friars ('religious') are listed separately, and the lists of subdeacons, deacons and priests are also separated into beneficed and not beneficed (or 'not promoted'). The acolyte lists are unusual in giving a parish or diocese of origin.

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London, Essex and Hertfordshire clerks, clerics, monks and clergy
 (1361-1374)
Inhabitants of Norwich (1288-1391)
Among the documents preserved in the record room of the Guildhall in the city of Norwich were 13 rolls connected with the leet courts in the city during the 13th and 14th centuries while the frankpledge system on which they were based was still in full operation. William Hudson, vicar of St Peter Permountergate in the city, prepared a copy of the earliest of these, from 1288, and extracts from the leet rolls of 1289, 1290, 1291, 1293, 1296, 1300, c1307, 1313, 1375 and 1391, and from an account of amercements in 1364, a tithing roll of Mancroft leet of 1311, and inquisitions before the bailiffs in 1350, and these were published by the Selden Society in 1892, with an English translation facing the extended Latin text. In 1288 there were four leets in the city - Conesford (North Conesford, South Conesford and Berstrete subleets), Manecroft (St Stephen, St Peter de Manecroft), Wymer or Westwyk (St Giles, St Gregory, St Andrew and St George), and Over the Water (St Michael and St Clement. Each leet had separate courts and separate records within the rolls. Hudson lists the main categories of items recorded as: murder, violent death, nuisances, weights, unwholesome food, larceny, assaults, hue and cry, being out of tithing, non-attendance at leet, purprestures, forestalling, unlawful trading, craft gilds, fraudulent work, and impleading in the Court Christian.

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Inhabitants of Norwich
 (1288-1391)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1362-1404)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Urban V, Gregory XI, (Anti-Pope) Clement VII, Urban VI and Boniface IX, and the Lateran Regesta of Boniface IX. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Urban V was consecrated and crowned 6 November 1362 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); Gregory XI was crowned 5 January 1371; Clement VII 31 October 1378; Urban VI 18 April 1378; Boniface IX 9 November 1389 and died 1 October 1404. Until 1376 the papacy was in exile at Avignon. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss from Regesta ccxlv to cccxx and Lateran Regesta i to xliii, and published in 1902. Bliss remarked that 'although the writing of the Papal Registers of the 14th century is clearer than that of many contemporary English MSS., the entries in them were for the most part founded upon petitions or letters from different countries, and the scribes in the Papal Chancery must have experienced even greater difficulty in copying English proper names than English students experience nowadays in reading the early Chancery Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office. Not having local or personal knowledge, they constantly misread doubtful letters.'

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1362-1404)
Indults to Choose Confessors: Diocese of Lincoln (1404-1415)
Individuals (laymen, monks or priests) could obtain indults or indulgences from the Pope to choose their confessor, who might, after hearing their confession, grant them absolution, and enjoin a salutary penance, except in cases reserved to the apostolic see. Lists of these indults, headed De Confessionibus, were entered in the Lateran Regesta in the Vatican archives; from the reigns of popes Innocent VII to John XXIII (1404 to 1415) there are such lists in volumes CXIX, CXXXI, CLIX to CLXI, CLXV, CLXVII and CLXXXIV, from the first year of Innocent VII, the second year of Gregory XII, and the second to fifth years of John XXIII. Those relating to the British Isles were copied and translated by J. A. Twemlow, and printed under the direction of the Master of the Rolls in 1904. The diocese of Lincoln covered Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Rutland, Northamptonshire, Huntingdonshire, Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Bedfordshire, and part of Hertfordshire.

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Indults to Choose Confessors: Diocese of Lincoln
 (1404-1415)
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