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Scotman Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'scotman'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 8 records (displaying 1 to 8): 

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National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices (1769)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty (late payment of the 6d rate attracted double duty (D D) of 12d): the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 2 January to 31 December 1769.

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Masters of Apprentices
 (1769)
Cambridgeshire Voters: Soham (1832)
The poll on the election of three knights of the shire to serve in Parliament for the county of Cambridge, was taken at Cambridge, Royston, Newmarket, Ely, Wisbech and Whittlesea 18 and 19 December 1832. The candidates were Henry John Adeane esquire, Richard Greaves Townley esquire, Charles Philip Yorke esquire and John Walbanke Childers esquire. This poll book sets out the names of the voters in alphabetical order hundred by hundred and parish by parish. The voters' full names are stated, surname first. The right hand column records their votes. The new qualification for suffrage in the counties, after the passage of the 1832 Great Reform Bill, was the possession of a freehold estate worth 40s a year or more, a copyhold or long leasehold of 10 a year or more, or a tenancy or short leasehold of 50 a year or more.

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Cambridgeshire Voters: Soham
 (1832)
Graduates of Cambridge University (1760-1846)
Joseph Romilly, registrar of the university of Cambridge, compiled Graduati Cantabrigienses, a catalogue of graduates from the academic year of admissions 1760 through to 10 October 1846. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname, and then chronologically by christian name: the college is given, with an asterisk in those cases where the man became a fellow, and then, in chronological order, his degrees.

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Graduates of Cambridge University
 (1760-1846)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Agamemnon in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Agamemnon, a 91-gun screw steamer, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Agamemnon in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Scout (1860)
The China Medal was awarded to soldiers and sailors involved in the various actions of the war against China, in which this ship was engaged in 1860. The medals were either delivered on board or sent on in 1862: except that many of the men were no longer immediately traceable, and the remarks on the roll show that some medals were not sent on for several years, and some were never sent. After the main roll there is a section showing which of the men also qualified for clasps. Separate clasps were awarded for men who had been in receipt of the China Medal of 1842; for the taking of Fatshan in 1857, Canton in 1857, Taku Forts in 1858, Taku Forts in 1860, and Pekin in 1860. Most of the men on this ship are shown as having been given the Taku Forts 1860 clasp, for being actually present at the capture of the Taku Forts 21 August 1860; and the Pekin clasp, for being actually present before Pekin the day the gate of that city was given up to the allied (British and French) army, viz. on 13 October 1860.

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Sailors and marines on board Her Majesty's ship Scout
 (1860)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) (1881-1901)
Each year the best soldiers of the brigade were chosen for long service and good conduct medals. This register gives rank, name, regimental number, and date of recommendation. (The sample scan is from the East Surrey regiment). The register is essentially a register of recommendations, annotated with details of the issue of the medals. Where no gratuity accompanied the medal, the entry is marked 'W. G.' (without gratuity); where, for one reason or another, the medal was not issued, the entry is marked 'N. S.' (not sanctioned) and struck through. The rifle depot was at Winchester. There were four line battalions. The 1st battalion embarked for Bombay in 1880, and by 1885 was based at Belgaum. From 1885 to 1888 it served in Burma (adding "Burma, 1885-1887" to the regimental honours), returning to India before being sent (in 1894) to Hong Kong. In 1896 the 1st battalion was moved to Singapore, returning to England in 1898, and then being sent to South Africa ("South Africa, 1899-1902", "Defence of Ladysmith", "Relief of Ladysmith"). The 2nd battalion returned from Gibraltar to Ireland in 1880, moved to England in 1885 and was stationed at Aldershot; having served again in Ireland 1890 to 1895, it was sent from England to Malta in 1897, and to Crete and Egypt in 1898, taking part in the Soudan campaign ("Khartoum"). It was transferred to South Africa in 1899. The 3rd battalion was sent from Ireland to England in 1882, and in 1885 was at Aldershot; at the end of that year it was moved to Gibraltar; back to England in 1886; and embarked for Egypt 19 October 1887; went on to South Africa in 1888; and thence to India in 1889. In 1895 the 3rd battalion was serving at Rawal Pindee. The 4th battalion embarked for India 20 October 1873, and by 1885 was at Jhansi in Bengal; it was sent to Burma ("Burma, 1885-1887"), returned to England 27 January 1890, and in 1895 was at Aldershot. In 1896 the 4th battalion moved to Ireland, and in 1900 was sent to South Africa.

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Outstanding soldiers of the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own)
 (1881-1901)
Naval Ratings Killed in 1914 (1914)
The monthly lists of Royal Navy ratings killed from the start of the Great War through to the end of December 1914 are aranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with rank, and official number. The lists include marines, reservists, and a few civilian canteen staff also killed in the conflict. Full names are given, except for a few cases where a middle name is represented only by an initial.

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Naval Ratings Killed in 1914
 (1914)
London Telephone Subscribers (1939)
The London telephone directory lists subscribers alphabetically by surname and then by christian name or initials, with their postal address and telephone number. This is the L to Z directory issued in May 1939, but also contains some names from earlier in the alphabet, for instance in the separate section for midwives. The London telephone districts comprised not only the city centre, but also the very extensive suburbs in the Home Counties (Essex, Kent, Surrey and Middlesex).

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London Telephone Subscribers
 (1939)
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