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Maltravers Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'maltravers'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 21 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons (1129-1130)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the earliest surviving roll, believed to be from the 31st year of the reign of king Henry I, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1129 to Michaelmas 1130: this is a period for which there are no other general English records, so these rolls give details of many persons and incidents otherwise utterly unknown. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and pardons. There is a separate return in each year for each shire, the name of the shire being here printed at the top of each page. Wales was still independent, in separate kingdoms, at this period, and is not included, except for 'Herefordshire in Wales'. There is virtually no reference to the palatinates of Chester, Lancaster and Durham, or to Cumberland and Westmoreland in the far northwest.

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons
 (1129-1130)
Grantees of royal lands and pardons (1155-1158)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. The rolls for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th years of the reign of king Henry II are covered by this volume: this is a period for which there are no other general English records, so these rolls give details of many persons and incidents otherwise utterly unknown. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and pardons. There is a separate return in each year for each shire, the name of the shire being here printed at the top of each page. Wales was still independent, in separate kingdoms, at this period, and is not included, except for 'Herefordshire in Wales'. There is virtually no reference to the palatinates of Chester, Lancaster and Durham, or to Cumberland and Westmoreland in the far northwest.

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Grantees of royal lands and pardons
 (1155-1158)
Curia Regis Rolls (1196-1201)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1196-1201)
Liberate Rolls (1260-1267)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 45th to 51st years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1260-1267)
Pontefract Cartulary (1100-1300)
The Cluniac monastery of St John the Evangelist at Pontefract (Pomfret) in the West Riding of Yorkshire, was founded in the 11th century by Robert de Lascy. The grants of land made to the priory from then well into the 13th century were copied into a cartulary or chartulary which eventually came to Godfrey Wentworth of Woolley Park. This was edited by Richard Holmes and published by Yorkshire Archaeological Society in 1899 and 1902. The individuals named are mainly local landowners and tenants, canons, servants and wellwishers of the monastery. The charters before 1250 are often undated: the numbering of the charters is modern, and amounts to 561. The cartulary itself contains 11 fasciculi, to which Holmes gave these section names - I. The Seigniorial Charters; II. The Ecclesiastical Charters; III. Royal Charters and Confirmations; IV. The Local Charters (Pontefract &c.); V. The Ledstone Charters; VI. The Ledsham Charters; VII. Miscellaneous Charters; VIII. The Peckfield and other Charters; IX. and X. Scarborough and other Charters; and XI. Leases to Tenants. Ledston(e), Ledsham and Peckfield are all close to Pontefract, as is most of the property.

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Pontefract Cartulary
 (1100-1300)
Charter Rolls (1050-1326)
This abstract of the surviving charter rolls for 1300 to 1326, in the reigns of kings Edward I and II, was prepared by C. G. Crump and A. E. Stamp and published in 1908. The charter rolls not only recorded royal grants of lands, liberties and offices, but also enabled landowners to have their existing charters, their deeds of title, registered by the process of inspeximus and confirmation. After the Statute of Mortmain of 1279, this was of particular importance to religious houses, now greatly restricted in their ability to receive new donations of land, and anxious to prove title to their ancient property. Consequently, many charters of great age were copied onto the charter rolls.

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Charter Rolls
 (1050-1326)
Clerks and Clergy in Somerset (1309-1329)
The register of bishop John de Drokenesford of Bath and Wells, edited by Bishop Hobhouse and published by the Somerset Record Society in 1887. It contains general diocesan business, mostly relating to clergy, but with some parochial affairs and disputes with names of parishioners. There are no ordination lists. The diocese of Bath and Wells at this period was almost exactly coextensive with the county of Somerset.

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Clerks and Clergy in Somerset
 (1309-1329)
English administration in Ireland (1392-1393)
This roll of proceedings of the King's Council in Ireland from June 1392 to April 1393, in the 16th year of the reign of Richard II, survived among the archives of the Marquis of Ormode; it was transcribed by the Reverend James Graves, and published in 1877 as a volume in the Chronicles and Memorials series. Part of the record is in Latin, part in French, and Graves provided translations into English for all the French text. The record is mainly of commissions, letters of protection, and fiats for registration on the Patent Roll. Some related documents from the British Museum and the Public Record Office are transcribed in the appendix, including an inspeximus of 1444 with the names of burgesses of Drogheda.

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English administration in Ireland
 (1392-1393)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1571-1575)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1571-1575)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
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