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Macilroy Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'macilroy'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1585-1592)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 1 August 1585 to 31 July 1592, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1881. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 774) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, with intermixed Acta Proper (political edicts), Decreta (judicial decisions), Acta Cautionis (acts of caution) and Bands (registration of bonds). After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years: additional acts of caution (775-778); ordinances and acts anent the Borders and the North (779-814); and miscellaneous privy council papers (815-834). The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1585-1592)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1592-1599)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from August 1592 to May 1599, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1882. The publication brings together the contents of the principal register (Acta Secreti Concilii) with acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp 561-730); Acts and Ordinances relating to the Borders and the North (731-748); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (749-769). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1592-1599)
Residents and Traders in Birmingham (1861)
William Cornish's Corporation General and Trades Directory covered Birmingham, Coventry and the towns of the Black Country. The Birmingham section contains both street lists and this general alphabetical directory.

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Residents and Traders in Birmingham
 (1861)
Traders and Professionals in Birmingham and Suburbs (1878)
The Post Office Directory of Birmingham with its Suburbs, edited by E. R. Kelly, and published in 1878, has two main alphabetical lists - Court and Commercial. The suburbs included are Aston, Bickenhill Park, Birchfield End, Castle Bromwich, Erdington, Saltley (with Washwood Heath), Ward End (including Little Bromwich) and Witton, in Warwickshire; Handsworth (with Soho), Harborne, Perry Barr and Smethwick, in Staffordshire; and King's Heath, King's Norton, Moseley, Northfield, Selly Oak and Yardley (including Hall Green and Stechford) in Worcestershire. The Commercial section, indexed here, lists all manner of traders, professional people and businesses.

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Traders and Professionals in Birmingham and Suburbs
 (1878)
Debtors (1887)
County Court Judgments in England and Wales. April to June 1887

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Debtors
 (1887)
National ArchivesBritish artillerymen fighting in South Africa (1899-1902)
The Queen Victoria's South Africa Medal was awarded (after her death, in the event) to all who had served honourably in the various campaigns in the Boer War. Returns were made from each unit, and consolidated into nominal roll, of which this is the one for the Royal Artillery. Confusingly, the ledgers used had originally been printed for a register of men transferred (or re-transferred after mobilization) to 1st Class Army Reserve. All the original column headings were therefore struck through, and the roll was prepared with this information: Date of Issue; Regimental Number; Rank; Name; Unit; Medal (a 1 indicating that a medal was awarded); [number of] Clasps; the reference to the source in the original returns, usually starting with AG for papers in the hands of the Adjutant-General, and 68/Art/ for the Royal Artillery records. The final column, normally left blank, was occasionally used for explanatory remarks.

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British artillerymen fighting in South Africa
 (1899-1902)
National ArchivesQueen's South Africa Medal: Royal Field Artillery: 18th Battery (1901-1905)
The nominal roll for the Queen Victoria's South Africa Medal - awarded (after her death, in the event) to all who had served honourably in the various campaigns in the Boer War - was compiled from these returns from the individual units. Two sets of form were completed. The main one, as in the sample scan, dates from 1901 and gives regimental number, rank, and full name (surname first), followed by a series of columns relating to different actions - Belmont, Modder River, Paardeberg, Dreifontein, Wepener, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast, Wittebergen, Defence of Kimberley, Relief of Kimberley, Defence of Mafeking, Relief of Mafeking, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, Rhodesia, Talana, Elandslaagte, Tugela Heights, Defence of Ladysmith, Relief of Ladysmith, Laing's Nek, and Natal; each entitled the man to a separate clasp to the medal, and a tick or a Yes in the appropriate column indicates the man's actual physical presence in that battle. A final column for remarks is important in those cases where the man was no longer in the unit, by removal, death or desertion. The second form that sometimes occurs was returned in 1905, and covers men entitled to the Second South African War Medal and Clasps. It lists men by number, rank and name, checks whether they had claimed the Queen's South Africa Medal, and then enquires as to their suitability as to three Colony Clasps, which could be awarded for service in the Cape, Orange Free, or Transvaal; whether entitled to Date Clasps (South Africa 1901 and South Africa 1902); whether also entitled to the King's South Africa Medal; any other corps in which served in South Africa; and remarks (such as becoming non-effective, forfeiture, &c.) WO 100/141

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Queen's South Africa Medal: Royal Field Artillery: 18th Battery
 (1901-1905)
London Telephone Subscribers (1939)
The London telephone directory lists subscribers alphabetically by surname and then by christian name or initials, with their postal address and telephone number. This is the L to Z directory issued in May 1939, but also contains some names from earlier in the alphabet, for instance in the separate section for midwives. The London telephone districts comprised not only the city centre, but also the very extensive suburbs in the Home Counties (Essex, Kent, Surrey and Middlesex).

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London Telephone Subscribers
 (1939)
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