Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Maccall Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'maccall'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 27 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Open Access
Buying all 27 results of this search individually would cost £138.00. But you can have free access to all 27 records for a year, to view, to save and print, for £100. Save £38.00. More...

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1484-1492)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Lateran and Vatican Regesta of pope Innocent VIII. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which most of the key government and ecclesiastical records of this period are lost. Innocent VIII was consecrated and crowned 12 September 1484 (the day from which his pontificate is dated) and died at Rome 25 July 1492. The extracts were made by J. A. Twemlow from Vatican Regesta dclxxxii to dcclxxi and Lateran Regesta dcccxxxviii to dcccxl.

MACCALL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1484-1492)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

MACCALL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1585-1592)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 1 August 1585 to 31 July 1592, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1881. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 774) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, with intermixed Acta Proper (political edicts), Decreta (judicial decisions), Acta Cautionis (acts of caution) and Bands (registration of bonds). After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years: additional acts of caution (775-778); ordinances and acts anent the Borders and the North (779-814); and miscellaneous privy council papers (815-834). The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

MACCALL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1585-1592)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1610-1613)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1610 to February 1613, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1889. The publication starts with the Acta and Decreta, a chronological consolidation of material from Acta Secreti Concilii proper, the Decreta, the Book of Commissions, the Book of Sederunts, the Minute Book of Processes, and The Book of the Isles. There is then a section of Royal and Other Letters (pp. 565-644); then acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp. 647-690); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (693-746). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

MACCALL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1610-1613)
City of London: Salters (1724)
A list of the members of the several London livery companies that polled for Edward Bellamy esquire to be sheriff for the city of London and county of Middlesex for the remaining part of the year, published 16 March 1724. Full names are given, surname first, arranged roughly alphabetically by company.

MACCALL. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
City of London: Salters
 (1724)
Edinburgh Directory (1819)
The Post-Office Annual Directory, from Whitsunday 1819 to Whitsunday 1820. Containing an alphabetical arrangement of the noblemen, private gentlemen, merchants, traders, and others, in the city and suburbs of Edinburgh, with their residence. Printed by John Pillans, published under the patronage of the Rt Hon the Earl of Caithness, Postmaster-General for Scotland.

MACCALL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Edinburgh Directory
 (1819)
Officers of the British Army (1832)
The annual Army List, published By Authority, first lists officers of the rank of major and above, by rank, and with dates of appointment to each successive higher rank; holders of crosses, crosses with clasps (with number of clasps indicated), medals, medals with clasps (with number of clasps indicated) are marked as such; and an ornate W indicates those officers actually present in any of the actions of 16, 17 or 18 June 1815 and therefore awarded the Waterloo Medal. For each officer in this section, the final column notes his then present or immediately former regiment and/or office, if any. Next, all the officers of the army are listed, down to the rank of ensign, by regiment or corps, giving rank, name, date of rank in the regiment, and date of rank in the army, with occasional further notes. Again, holders of medals are duly noted, as in the first list. For each regiment the paymaster, adjutant, quartermaster, surgeon and assistant surgeons are named, as well as the civilian agent; and the regimental motto, battle honours, and colours of the facings and lace of the dress uniform are stated. After the British regiments of the line, the officers of the West India infantry, the Ceylon rifles, the Royal African Colonial Corps, the Cape Mounted Riflemen, the Royal Newfoundland Veterans, and the Royal Malta Fencibles are given; then the officers of the garrisons and other military establishments in Great Britain, Ireland, North America and Gibraltar (with Malta); the Royal Artillery; Commissariat Department; Medical Department; Chaplains' Department; officers retained on full pay; officers on British half pay; and officers on Foreign half pay (including the German Legion, the Brunswick Cavalry, the Brunswick Infantry, Chasseurs Brittaniques, Corsican Rangers, Dillon's Regiment, the Greek Light Infantry, Malta Regiment, Meuron's Regiment, Roll's Regiment, Sicilian Regiment, Watteville's Regiment, and the York Light Infantry Volunteers).

MACCALL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Officers of the British Army
 (1832)
Officers of the British Army (1840)
The New Annual Army List, corrected to 7 February 1840, was published in London by Lieut. H. G. Hart. It lists all serving officers, first of all a list of General and Field Officers by rank from field marshal down to major; and then by regiment, including all ranks down to ensign, with paymasters, adjutants, quarter-masters, surgeons and assistant-surgeons. These lists are all annotated with dates of rank in the army and regiment, and with symbols indicating the officers present at Trafalgar (T), in the Peninsula or the South of France (P), and Waterloo (W). A superscript p indicates that the commission was purchased; an asterisk that it was temporary. The regiments and units are listed in order of precedence: Head Quarters staff; Life Guards; Horse Guards; 7 regiments of Dragoon Guards; 17 regiments of Dragoons; 98 regiments of Foot; the Rifle Brigade; two West India regiments of Foot; Ceylon Rifles; Royal African Colonial Corps; Cape Mounted Rifles; Royal Newfoundland Veterans; Royal Malta Fencibles; Recruiting Staff; Royal Artillery; Royal Engineers; Royal Marines; Commissariat; and the Medical Department.

MACCALL. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Officers of the British Army
 (1840)
British Army officers (1841)
The Royal Kalendar lists general and field officers of the British Army - five Field Marshals, 95 generals, 138 major-generals, 310 colonels, 637 lieutenant-colonels, 697 majors, in order of precedence according to year of precedence, and with the regiment indicated for each; then there are aides-de-camp to her Majesty queen Victoria; retired officers specially allowed to retain their ranks; and then the queen's land forces, set out regiment by regiment and battalion by battalion, naming the colonel, lieutenant-colonel and major for each, officers of the British garrisons, and of the Tower of London; and the officers of the Royal Regiment of Artillery (including the Field Train) and the Corps of Royal Engineers, by rank.

MACCALL. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
British Army officers
 (1841)
Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1841)
Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together, with the word 'AEq.'). Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. Winners of Dr Smith's Mathematical Prizes are marked (1) senior, (2) for junior. The Greek letter alpha is affixed to the names of those students who had gained first class results in the Classical Tripos; beta to those entered in the second class; and gamma to those entered in the third class. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)

MACCALL. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Mathematics students at Cambridge University
 (1841)
1 | 2 | 3Next page

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.