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Macbrayne Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'macbrayne'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 20 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1592-1599)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from August 1592 to May 1599, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1882. The publication brings together the contents of the principal register (Acta Secreti Concilii) with acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp 561-730); Acts and Ordinances relating to the Borders and the North (731-748); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (749-769). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

MACBRAYNE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1592-1599)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1610-1613)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from July 1610 to February 1613, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1889. The publication starts with the Acta and Decreta, a chronological consolidation of material from Acta Secreti Concilii proper, the Decreta, the Book of Commissions, the Book of Sederunts, the Minute Book of Processes, and The Book of the Isles. There is then a section of Royal and Other Letters (pp. 565-644); then acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp. 647-690); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (693-746). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1610-1613)
Scotland Bankrupts and Insolvents (1820)
Official notices to creditors were published in the Edinburgh Gazette. This is the index to the bankrupts and insolvents. January to December 1820.

MACBRAYNE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Scotland Bankrupts and Insolvents
 (1820)
The Edinburgh Gazette (1846)
The Edinburgh Gazette is the official publication in which various Scottish legal notices are issued, as well as promotions and casualty lists for the British army as a whole, and brief lists of English bankrupts. The key source for tracing details of Scottish bankruptcies, insolvencies, and dissolutions of business partnerships.

MACBRAYNE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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The Edinburgh Gazette 
 (1846)
Boys entering Cheltenham College (1879)
Cheltenham College 'was founded in order to provide for the sons of gentlemen a Classical, Mathematical, and General Education of the highest order, on moderate terms, in strict conformity with the principles and doctrines of the Church of England.' Andrew Alexander Hunter, the college registrar, compiled the first edition of the College Register in four parts from 1883 to 1886: these merely listed the boys by term of entry, with their dates of birth and names and addresses of their fathers. Circulars were also sent out to all Old Cheltonians whose addresses were known, requesting additional details. On the basis of the returns from these and Hunter's further researches, this much fuller register was published in 1890. The information after each boy's name is given (where known and applicable) in this format: father's full name and address as of the time the boy entered the college; class and department on entering the college (classes being number from 1 downwards, and these again divided into A and B, some into C and D, others into P (Principal's side) and V. P. (Vice-Principal's side) - 1A was the highest class in each department: besides this, certain others were called Addiscombe, Woolwich, Civil, Direct, Line, Sandhurst, Naval, Special, Preparatory, Latin, and India Civil) and the same on leaving, name of Boarding House (or 'Day Boy'), scholastic and athletic honours attained at the college, and subsequent career (including date and place of death, or present address in 1890, if known).

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Boys entering Cheltenham College 
 (1879)
Mathematics students at Cambridge University (1888)
Tripos lists or examination results for the year, arranged by class (Wranglers, Senior Optimes and Junior Optimes), and within each class in order of score in the examination (the names of candidates with equal scores are bracketed together, with the word 'AEq.'). There is a main combined list for Parts I and II, and then, for students who went on to take Part III, a minor list, divided into Division I, Division II and Division III. Each student's surname and college is given: this list was printed in 1890, and was annotated with asterisks to show which students had subsequently become fellows of the university; and with footnotes showing those who became headmasters, &c., elsewhere. The few women students are listed separately, but the names are annotated so as to identify precisely where in order of merit they fell within the ranks of the male students. These lists are particularly useful in identifying for an individual the fellow-students who will have attended lectures with him; and, where from the college, are likely to have been even more closely associated by having been under the same supervisor. (The sample scan is from the start of the Mathematics Tripos list for 1770)

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Mathematics students at Cambridge University
 (1888)
Boys entering Fettes College, Edinburgh (1895)
Fettes College, Edinburgh, was opened in 1870 under the terms of a trust 'for maintenance, education, and outfit of young people whose parents have either died without leaving sufficient funds for that purpose, or who, from innocent misfortune during their own lives, are unable to give suitable education to their children'. In 1923 this edition of the Fettes College Register was published; in it the compilers sought to set out for each boy who had attended the college a brief synopsis of what was known about his time at the school, his subsequent career, and date and place of death, or address as of 1923. After each name there is a letter in brackets indicating the house to which the pupil belonged - (C.) Carrington House; (G.) Glencorse House; (K.) Kimmerghame House; (M.) Moredun House; (S.) Schoolhouse. An asterisk indicates that the boy was a foundationer, i. e. supported by the foundation; a dagger that he was a foundation scholar. VIA. indicates Upper Form; Mods. Modern School; Army Cl., Army Class; S. P., School Prefect; xx. First Rugby Football Twenty; xv. First Rugby Football Fifteen; xx. cap. Caps occasionally given to the five (or fewer) next to the First Fifteen after 1875; xi. First Cricket Eleven; viii. Gymnastic Eight; Trs. Prizes and Exhib., Trustees' Prizes and Exhibitions; Govs. Prizes and Exhib., Governors' Prizes and Exhibitions; Schol., scholarship; M., married. Month and year of birth is given in square brackets.

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Boys entering Fettes College, Edinburgh
 (1895)
Eton College boys and masters (1900)
Printed lists of boys attending Eton College were issued each School-Time or term. This is the list for Michaelmas School-Time, 1900. The governors and masters of the schools are given first: then the names of a scholar elected for King's in December 1899, and the names and ages of 20 scholars elected for Eton in July 1900, 12 of whom had been admitted. Winners of the Newcastle Scholarship, two each year, back to 1829, and of the various college scholarships and prizes for 1899, precede the Distinctions in Trials (examinations) for July 1900. The First Hundred and Certificate examination list for Election 1900 list the boys in order of merit and with the marks awarded in Classics, Mathematics, Scripture Knowledge and History. The Certificate list is divided into First, Second and Third Classes, Passed, and Failed. The names of examiners and absentees are also given. Then follow the main lists of all the pupils, arranged by class. For every boy his position in class, surname, house tutor's name and classical tutor's name, are given; and evey boy's entry is annotated with details of his prizes during his whole period at the school. In the fifth forms the list for each class is divided into four parts, divided by a dotted line, then a wavy line, and then a full line. The top fourth had all obtained distinction in the last trials; those above the wavy line had been classed in the last trials; next were the unclassed; and below the full line were those boys who had failed in the trials.

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Eton College boys and masters
 (1900)
Eton College boys and masters (1900)
Printed lists of boys attending Eton College were issued each School-Time or term. This is the list for Lent School-Time, 1900. The governors and masters of the schools are given first: then the names of a scholar elected for King's in December 1899, and the names and ages of 16 scholars elected for Eton in July 1899, 12 of whom had been admitted. Winners of the Newcastle Scholarship, two each year, back to 1829 (here indexed from 1859 onwards), and of the various college scholarships and prizes for 1899, precede the Distinctions in Trials (examinations) for December 1899. The First Hundred and Certificate examination list for Election 1899 list the boys in order of merit and with the marks awarded in Classics, Mathematics, Scripture Knowledge and History. The Certificate list is divided into First, Second and Third Classes, Passed, and Failed. The names of examiners and absentees are also given. Then follow the main lists of all the pupils, arranged by class. For every boy his position in class, surname, house tutor's name and classical tutor's name, are given; and evey boy's entry is annotated with details of his prizes during his whole period at the school. In the fifth forms the list for each class is divided into four parts, divided by a dotted line, then a wavy line, and then a full line. The top fourth had all obtained distinction in the last trials; those above the wavy line had been classed in the last trials; next were the unclassed; and below the full line were those boys who had failed in the trials.

MACBRAYNE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Eton College boys and masters
 (1900)
Eton College boys and masters (1900)
Printed lists of boys attending Eton College were issued each School-Time or term. This is the list for Midsummer School-Time, 1900. The governors and masters of the schools are given first: then the names of a scholar elected for King's in December 1899, and the names and ages of 16 scholars elected for Eton in July 1899, 15 of whom had been admitted. Winners of the Newcastle Scholarship, two each year, back to 1829, and of the various college scholarships and prizes for 1899 and 1900, precede the Distinctions in Trials (examinations) for March 1900. The First Hundred and Certificate examination list for Election 1899 list the boys in order of merit and with the marks awarded in Classics, Mathematics, Scripture Knowledge and History. The Certificate list is divided into First, Second and Third Classes, Passed, and Failed. The names of examiners and absentees are also given. Then follow the main lists of all the pupils, arranged by class. For every boy his position in class, surname, house tutor's name and classical tutor's name, are given; and evey boy's entry is annotated with details of his prizes during his whole period at the school. In the fifth forms the list for each class is divided into four parts, divided by a dotted line, then a wavy line, and then a full line. The top fourth had all obtained distinction in the last trials; those above the wavy line had been classed in the last trials; next were the unclassed; and below the full line were those boys who had failed in the trials.

MACBRAYNE. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Eton College boys and masters
 (1900)
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