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Job Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'job'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 177 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Norfolk Feet of Fines (1192-1214)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Norfolk

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Norfolk Feet of Fines
 (1192-1214)
Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire (1361-1370)
The register of bishop Louis de Charltone of Hereford, containing general diocesan business, but also including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire.

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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire and Gloucestershire
 (1361-1370)
Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire, Gloucestershire and Devon (1370-1375)
The register of bishop William de Courtenay of Hereford, containing general diocesan business, but also including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Hereford diocese covered almost all Herefordshire, southern rural Shropshire, a westward arm of Worcestershire, and a northwestern slice of Gloucestershire. The ordinations for the first two years, 1370 and 1371, took place while the bishop was still resident in Devon, and contain mainly Devon men.

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Clerks and Clergy in Herefordshire, Shropshire, Gloucestershire and Devon
 (1370-1375)
Oxfordshire Charters (1420-1429)
A large accumulation of documents preserved in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, formerly constituted the antiquarian collections of Anthony a Wood, Roger Dodsworth, Ralph Thoresby, Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Thomas Tanner bishop of St Asaph, Dr Richard Rawlinson, Richard Furney archdeacon of Surrey, and Richard Gough. A calendar of these was prepared by William H. Turner and published in 1878 under the title 'Calendar of Charters and Rolls preserved in the Bodleian Library'. The word 'charters' is here used in a rather loose sense, including virtually any manuscript or copy of a manuscript, but the bulk of the contents consists of mediaeval deeds of conveyance. Turner's calendar deals with each briefly, naming the principal parties and the nature of the deed, but hardly ever lists the witnesses. Many of these charters were undated (dating of deeds did not become general until around 1350) or so damaged or defective ('mutilated' is Turner's usual description) as no longer to display a legible date. However, he contrived, from the style of the script and/or the nature of the contents, to estimate dates in such cases. The sample scan is from the start of the Bedfordshire list.

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Oxfordshire Charters
 (1420-1429)
Poor English Pilgrims in Rome (1506)
Registers of English pilgrims staying in Rome, preserved among the archives of the English College, were extracted by W. C. Trevelyan and communicated to the Rev. John Hodgson, who published them in 1838. Two separate lists were maintained - of the rich and nobles, and of the poor. Both lists give date, full name, and diocese of origin in England and Wales.

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Poor English Pilgrims in Rome
 (1506)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Secretary of State's Papers (1598)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1598)
Hastings family deeds (1100-1600)
John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, of which is the first volume, published in 1928, Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli. This volume covers four categories of the records: the Ancient Deeds; Manorial and other Documents; Accounts and Inventories; and Miscellaneous Papers. Most, but not all, of the material is mediaeval. About half of the deeds relate to the family property in Leicestershire; then there are sections for Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire, Warwickshire, Staffordshire, Yorkshire, Northumberland, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, London, Wiltshire, Somersetshire, Devonshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, &c. The manorial section includes a partitions of the estates of the Earls of Leicester and Wilton about 1204 and 1277; manor court rolls are mentioned, but not extracted. Choicer items from the family accounts and inventories are copied in extenso for 1596 and 1607, and thereafter summarised. Most of the later material is merely dipped into for curiosities.

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Hastings family deeds
 (1100-1600)
Official Papers (1660-1661)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. The records of these years immediately after the restoration of the monarchy include many petitions to Charles II for offices and possessions lost during the Civil War.

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Official Papers
 (1660-1661)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage. This index also includes marriage licence allegations for the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, 1558 to 1699.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1679)
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