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Golson Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'golson'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 10 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Secretary of State's Papers (1597)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1597)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1577-1700)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1588 to 1754 are also included here.

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Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1577-1700)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1712)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 23 November to 31 December 1712.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1712)
Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex (1670-1739)
Sussex was in the Diocese of Chichester, divided into two archdeaconries - Chichester for west Sussex, Lewes for the east. Both archdeaconries exercised active probate jurisdictions, and issued marriage licences. Those issued by Lewes Archdeaconry court in this period were recorded in a series of registers (E3, E4, E5 and E6), which were edited by Edwin H. W. Dunkin and published by the Sussex Record Society in 1907. Each entry gives the date of the licence, the full names of bride and groom, with parish for each, and often stating whether the bride was a widow or maiden. To obtain a licence it was necessary for the parties to obtain a bond, with two sureties. One of these was often the prospective husband; the other might be a relative or other respectable person. From the bonds the names of the sureties were also copied into the register, together with the name of the church at which the wedding was intended to take place. These details are usually given until 1701; thereafter sureties and intended church are usually omitted. One deanery in Lewes archdeaconry, that of South Malling, was an exempt jurisdiction (or peculiar) of the Archbishop of Canterbury, which had separate probate and issued its own marriage licences, also recorded in a series of registers. This volume also includes the contents of registers C1 to C6 of the Deanery of South Malling, for marriage licences from 1620 to 1732. The details recorded are as with the main series, similarly lacking names of sureties and intended church after 1721. South Malling deanery comprised the parishes of Edburton, Lindfield, Buxted, Framfield, Isfield, Uckfield, Mayfield, Wadhurst, Glynde, Ringmer, St Thomas at Cliffe, South Malling and Stanmer.

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Intended brides and grooms in East Sussex
 (1670-1739)
Bankrupts' Assignees (1841)
Assignees of bankrupts' estates (usually principal creditors and/or close relatives of the bankrupt) in England and Wales

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Bankrupts' Assignees
 (1841)
Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Guardsmen (1914-1918)
203 officers and 4508 other ranks of the Grenadier Guards were killed in the Great War; 242 officers and 6939 men were wounded. This nominal roll lists all the warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men killed in action, or who died of wounds or disease, in the European war of 1914 to 1918. Arranged alphabetically for each rank, the roll gives regimental number, surname and initials.

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Grenadier Guards Died in the Great War: Guardsmen
 (1914-1918)
Inhabitants of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham and Mottingham (1937)
Kelly's Directory of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham &c. includes this directory of private residents, listed alphabetically by surname and christian name, with address, covering an area extending from the river Thames on the north to Mottingham and Grove Park on the south, and from Eltham on the east to Deptford Creek and Hither Green on the west. These abbreviations are used in the addresses: B, Blackheath; D, Deptford; E G, East Greenwich; G, Greenwich; L, Lee; and Lew, Lewisham.

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Inhabitants of Blackheath, Lee, Greenwich, Eltham and Mottingham
 (1937)
Chartered Electrical Engineers (M. I. E. E. and A. M. I. E. E.) (1951)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871 under the name of The Society of Telegraph Engineers, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. This list of members, corrected to 2 July 1951, gives the names and addresses of the Members (M. I. E. E.) and Associate Members (A. M. I. E. E.), all of whom were entitled to describe themselves as Chartered Electrical Engineers. The names are given in bold, surname first; before each name is the year of attaining the grade of Associate Member (AM) or Member (M); and, before the address, the year of reaching each lower grade is also given, e. g. (G. 1931), G standing for Graduate, S for Student. Where the engineer was also a member of one of the institution's specialized sections, this abbreviation is given, in bold: M, Measurements Section; R, Radio Section; S, Supply Section; U, Utilization Section.

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Chartered Electrical Engineers (M. I. E. E. and A. M. I. E. E.)
 (1951)
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