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Gledall Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'gledall'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides (1604)
Southern Hertfordshire lay in the archdeaconry of St Albans. Marriage licences registered in the archdeaconry act books from 1584 to 1639, and surviving bonds and allegations from 1611 to 1620, 1625 to 1627, 1633 to 1637 and 1661 to 1668 were abstracted by A. E. Gibbs and printed in volume 1 of the Herts Genealogist and Antiquary published in 1895. Both the act books and the bonds normally give full name and parish of bride and groom, and state whether the bride was maiden or widow. A widow's previous married surname is given, not her maiden surname. Occasionally (doubtless when a party was under age) a father's name is given. The later act books sometimes stated at what church the wedding was intended to be celebrated. The marriage bonds give the name of the bondsman or surety. The surety's surname is often the same as the bride or groom, and doubtless in most cases the bondsman was a father or close relative; but a few innkeepers and other tradesmen of St Albans also undertook this duty.

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St Albans Archdeaconry Marriage Licences: Brides
 (1604)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Intended Brides in Yorkshire (1628)
William Paver, a 19th-century Yorkshire genealogist, made brief abstracts of early marriage licences (now lost) in York Registry. His manuscript, which became Additional Manuscripts 29667 in the British Museum, was transcribed by J. W. Clay, F. S. A., and printed in various issues of the Yorkshire Archaeological Journal: this is from the volume for 1903. Paver did not note the dates of the licences, merely listing them by year: his abstracts give the names and addresses of both parties, and the name of the parish church in which it was intended that the wedding would take place.

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Intended Brides in Yorkshire
 (1628)
Wills proved at York: Names of Testators (1627-1637)
The diocese of York comprised most of Yorkshire, and Nottinghamshire: the York Exchequer court was the ordinary probate jurisdiction for the Yorkshire part of the diocese, but some wills from Nottinghamshire and other parts of the province of York were also proved there. Dr Francis Collins compiled this index to the transcribed wills of the Prerogative and Exchequer Courts in the York registry proved from 1627 to 1637. The date on the left is that of probate; the testator's full name is then given (surname first), parish or place of abode, and sometimes occupation, and date that the will was executed; and volume and folio number where it the transcript commences. The Act Books were used by Dr Collins to supply deficiencies in the information from the transcripts.

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Wills proved at York: Names of Testators
 (1627-1637)
York Will Calendar (1660-1665)
The diocese of York comprised most of Yorkshire, and Nottinghamshire: the York Exchequer court was the ordinary probate jurisdiction for the Yorkshire part of the diocese, but some wills from Nottinghamshire and other parts of the province of York were also proved there. Dr Francis Collins compiled this index to the wills in the York registry proved from 1660 to 1665. The date of the probate precedes the name of the testator: during the period covered by the volume the dates of probate are very rarely given in the registers - they were therefore supplied from the Act Books. However, the Act Book for Ainsty, City and Craven deaneries is missing for this period, and in those cases no date could be given. In a very few instances (marked with an asterisk) in these deaneries in which the date has been supplied it has been taken from the registers. Additional matter from the Act Books is given within square brackets. Testators' names are given in full, surname first; then parish or place of abode, and in some cases occupation; then date of the will itself; and volume and folio number in the probate register. Where a place of burial, or intended burial, was indicated, that is also added, with the word 'bur.', within round brackets. All wills between 1652 and 1660 were proved in London; in practice, many Yorkshire wills had remained unproved at the date that the York Exchequer probate court was restored, and so there is in this list a large number of wills dating back through the 1650s.

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York Will Calendar
 (1660-1665)
Treasury Books (1704-1705)
Records of the Treasury administration in Britain, America and the colonies, for January 1704 to March 1705. The text covers a huge variety of topics involving all manner of receipts and expenditure, customs and revenue officials, civil servants, pensioners, petitioners and postmasters figuring particularly among the individuals named.

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Treasury Books
 (1704-1705)
National ArchivesApprentices registered at Northampton (1719-1721)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1718. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered at Northampton
 (1719-1721)
Lincolnshire Cottagers: Hemswell (1801)
Robert Gourlay published the results of a detailed survey that he had made in person travelling from village to village in Lincolnshire and Rutland, examining the state of the cottagers in each parish. After a general description of the local agriculture, he listed the cottagers by name, and, where possible, recorded the acreage of their holdings, annual rent, the number of persons in each family, and their stock, giving numbers of cows, pigs, horses &c.

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Lincolnshire Cottagers: Hemswell
 (1801)
Inhabitants of Huddersfield, Yorkshire (1853)
William White's directory lists traders, farmers and private residents in the area.

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Inhabitants of Huddersfield, Yorkshire
 (1853)
Merchants and traders in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1515-1898)
The society of Merchant Adventurers of Newcastle-upon-Tyne consisted of those who had obtained freedom of the city (allowing them to trade there) by birth as a son of, or apprenticeship, to a freeman: and within that, freedom of one of the three 'trades', i. e. boothman, draper or mercer. F. W. Dendy prepared extracts from the merchant adventurers' records, the second volume, published by the Surtees Society in 1899 containing extracts from the minute books relating to the history of the merchants' court, an account of the long-standing dispute between the Newcastle company and the London company, some extracts relating to the relations between the Newcastle company and the Eastland Company (who had a monopoly of the trade with Russia and the Baltic), copies of the oaths used by the Newcastle company, the London company and the Eastland Company, and (pages 185 to 381) a list of the apprentices enrolled in, and of the freemen admitted to, the Newcastle company. This list is arranged in a table of seven columns: Name of Apprentice; Name of Father of Apprentice and Observations (particularly, instances where an apprentice is passed over to a new master during his apprenticeship); Master; Boothman (B.), Draper (D.) or Mercer (M.); Date of Indentures: Enrolment: Admission. All the dates are normalised to New Style, i. e. to the modern calendar. Finally, there is a list of sons and apprentices of members who, having thus acquired the right of freedom of the city, took up the freedom, but did not assume the freedom of any of the three trades. The index covers all the contents of the volume, not just the apprentice and freemen lists.

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Merchants and traders in Newcastle-upon-Tyne
 (1515-1898)
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