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Geneve Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'geneve'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Liberate Rolls (1240-1245)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 25th to 29th years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1240-1245)
Fine Rolls (1216-1246)
The fine rolls of the 1st to 30th years of the reign of king Henry III record part of the government administration in England. These excerpts from the rolls list in transcript applications by plaintiffs for various writs (such as 'ad terminum' and 'pone') and for assizes to be held by the justices in eyre to look into their grievances. A fine of half a mark (6s 8d) or a mark (13s 4d) was usually levied; the cases are normally identified by county, and record that the appropriate sheriff had been notified. There are also more extensive records, in which more detail is given. The excerpts were made by the Record Commission and printed in 1835.

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Fine Rolls
 (1216-1246)
Liberate Rolls (1245-1251)
These chancery liberate rolls of the 30th to 35th years of the reign of Henry III of England record the details of payments and allowances as part of the administration of government. Most entries start with the Latin words 'liberate', meaning 'deliver', or 'allocate', meaning allow. There are also 'contrabreves', warrants mainly to sheriffs of shires, assigning them tasks and allowing expenses. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but there are occasional references to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Liberate Rolls
 (1245-1251)
Fine Rolls (1246-1272)
The fine rolls of the 31st to 57th years of the reign of king Henry III record part of the government administration in England. These excerpts from the rolls list in transcript applications by plaintiffs for various writs (such as 'ad terminum' and 'pone') and for assizes to be held by the justices in eyre to look into their grievances. A fine of half a mark (6s 8d) or a mark (13s 4d) was usually levied; the cases are normally identified by county, and record that the appropriate sheriff had been notified. There are also more extensive records, in which more detail is given. The excerpts were made by the Record Commission and printed in 1836.

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Fine Rolls
 (1246-1272)
Northumberland Assize Rolls for the General Eyre (1256-1279)
The royal justices made periodic general eyres through all the shires of England, hearing civil and criminal cases that had accrued from the lower courts. Here we have the assize rolls of three Northumberland eyres, 24 April to 7 May 1256; 25 June to 15 July 1269; and 20 January to 9 February 1279. The bulk of the text relates to civil pleas from the county of Northumberland and the town of Newcastle upon Tyne; finishing with abstracts of the pedes finium, or feet of fines (lawsuits or pretended lawsuits establishing the ownership of land) arising at the three eyres. But there are also criminal cases (as in the scan here), lists of bailiffs, &c.

GENEVE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Northumberland Assize Rolls for the General Eyre
 (1256-1279)
Charter Rolls (1050-1326)
This abstract of the surviving charter rolls for 1300 to 1326, in the reigns of kings Edward I and II, was prepared by C. G. Crump and A. E. Stamp and published in 1908. The charter rolls not only recorded royal grants of lands, liberties and offices, but also enabled landowners to have their existing charters, their deeds of title, registered by the process of inspeximus and confirmation. After the Statute of Mortmain of 1279, this was of particular importance to religious houses, now greatly restricted in their ability to receive new donations of land, and anxious to prove title to their ancient property. Consequently, many charters of great age were copied onto the charter rolls.

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Charter Rolls
 (1050-1326)
Close Rolls (1343-1346)
The close rolls of the 17th, 18th and 19th years of the reign of king Edward III record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Close Rolls
 (1343-1346)
Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1342-1362)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Clement VI and Innocent VI, from the period when the papal court was resident at Avignon. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Clement VI was consecrated and crowned 19 May 1342 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); Innocent VI was crowned 18 December 1352 and died 12 September 1362. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss and C. Johnson from Regesta cxxxvii to ccxliv, and published in 1897. The registers are almost complete for these two pontificates. At his accession, Clement VI promised to grant benefices to all poor clerks who should come to Avignon and claim them within two months of his coronation. As many as 100,000 are said to have come, and the register for the first year of his pontificate runs to twelve volumes.

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1342-1362)
Members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (M. I. Mech. E.) (1947)
The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, founded in 1847, was incorporated by royal charter in 1930. The list of members of 1 March 1947 gives the names (surname first) and addresses of the seven classes of member - Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Mech. E.); Members (M. I. Mech. E.); Associate Members (A. M. I. Mech. E.); Companions (C. I. Mech. E.); Associates (A. I. Mech. E.); Graduates (G. I. Mech. E.); and Students (S. I. Mech. E.). The year of attaining qualification is given in the left-hand margin; in the higher grades the years of achieving the lower grades are also given, bracketed together. The crossed swords symbol indicates naval or military service during the Great War of 1914-1918; an italic b shows a member of the Benevolent Fund. (p) after a Graduate's or a Student's name indicates one who had passed the whole of the A. M. Examination or its recognized equivalent.

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Members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (M. I. Mech. E.)
 (1947)
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