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Galer Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'galer'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 39 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

GALER. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
PCC Probates and Administrations (1631)
The Prerogative Court of Canterbury's main jurisdiction was central and southern England and Wales, as well as over sailors &c dying abroad: these brief abstracts, compiled under the title "Year Books of Probates", and printed in 1902, usually give address, date of probate and name of executor or administrator. They are based on the Probate Act Books, cross-checked with the original wills, from which additional details are, occasionally, added. The original spelling of surnames was retained, but christian and place names have been modernised where necessary.

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PCC Probates and Administrations
 (1631)
Freeholders of Harmondsworth (1705)
This 'Exact List of the Poll At the Chusing of Knights of the Shire for the County of Middlesex, Taken at New-Brentford, on Monday the 28th of May, 1705' lists all the freeholders eligible to vote, parish by parish, with an indication on the righthand side whether each voted for Sir John Wolstenholme, baronet, (Wo) or Score Barker, esquire, (Ba), or not at all. Those qualified to vote were men of full age (over 21) in possession of a freehold estate worth 40s a year or more.

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Freeholders of Harmondsworth
 (1705)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1749)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship.

GALER. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1749)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1700-1752)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county: numerically, the the most cases (240) concerned assaults; presentments about repairs to roads and bridges (67); larceny (63); unlicensed and disorderly alehouses (33); nuisances (28); and trading without due apprenticeship (24). This calendar gives abstracts of all entries in the Sessions Books and Minute Books for Hertfordshire sessions for the period.

GALER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1700-1752)
Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to those who gained their freedom by marriage.

GALER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Freemen of Canterbury by Marriage
 (1392-1800)
Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to all the stray names in the records: the wives and father-in-laws by whom freedom was acquired; the masters of apprentices; and other persons mentioned by the way in the record.

GALER. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury
 (1392-1800)
Minor offenders in Hitchin, Hertfordshire (1834-1835)
Justices of the Peace throughout England and Wales had the power of summary conviction for certain minor offences, principally vagrancy, poaching, petty theft, bastardy and assault. The magistrates' clerks for each district were required by Parliament to make a return of the names, offences, terms of imprisonment, and whether a written record was made of the proceedings, for the period from Michaelmas (29 September) 1834 to Michaelmas 1835. The return vary in completeness from magistrate to magistrate - the fullest returns also give the offender's address, the amount of fine or length of imprisonment, and/or the names of the justices.

GALER. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Minor offenders in Hitchin, Hertfordshire
 (1834-1835)
Insolvents (1836)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1836)
Dissolutions of Partnerships (1837)
Trade partnerships dissolved, or the removal of one partner from a partnership of several traders: in England and Wales

GALER. Cost: £6.00. Add to basket

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Dissolutions of Partnerships
 (1837)
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