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Froude Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'froude'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 69 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Close Rolls (1429-1435)
The close rolls of the 8th to 13th years of the reign of king Henry VI record the main artery of government administration in England, the orders sent out day by day to individual officers, especially sheriffs of shires: they are an exceptionally rich source for so early a period. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France. Also included is the Exchange Roll of 1424 to 1434, of licences to transmit sums of money out of the realm.

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Close Rolls
 (1429-1435)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1578-1585)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 17 June 1578 to 31 July 1585, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1880. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 762) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, and of occasional Conventions of the Estates. After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years. The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1578-1585)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1585-1592)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 1 August 1585 to 31 July 1592, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1881. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 774) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, with intermixed Acta Proper (political edicts), Decreta (judicial decisions), Acta Cautionis (acts of caution) and Bands (registration of bonds). After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years: additional acts of caution (775-778); ordinances and acts anent the Borders and the North (779-814); and miscellaneous privy council papers (815-834). The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

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Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1585-1592)
Colonists and adventurers (1610-1660)
During this period, the English crown issued charters to companies of adventurers and individual proprietors to establish settlements in Acadia (Nova Scotia), Africa, Amazon, Anguilla, Antigua, Association (Tortuga), Bahamas, Barbadoes, Barbuda, Bermudas (Somers Islands), Canada, Cape Gratia de Dios, Carolina, Bay of Darien, Delaware Bay, Deseada, Dominica, Eleuthera, Enegada, Fernando de Noronho, Floria, Fonseca, Grenada, Guadaloupe, Guiana, Guinea, Henrietta, Jamaica, Long Island, Maine, Marigalante, Maryland, Metalina, Montserrat, Narrangansetts Bay, Nevis, New England (New Plymouth, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Haven), Newfoundland, New Hampshire, New York, Nova Scotia, Providence Island, Quebec, Redendo, Rhode Island, St Bartholomew, St Brandon, St Christopher's, St Eustache, St Lucia, St Martin, St Vincent, Sembrera, Surinam, Tadousac, Tobago, Todosantes, Trinidad and Virginia. The central archive relating to these ventures up to 1688 amounted to 71 volumes of correspondence, plus 109 entry books containing entries of letters sent to the colonies, of charters, commissions and instructions, minutes and proceedings of the companies and proprietaries that in the first instance governed several of the colonies, journals of the Board of Trade, &c. This archive, called the State Papers, Colonial Series, at the Public Record Office, was calendared for the period through to 1660 by W. Noel Sainsbury, and published in 1860. The first few pages include material as early as 1574, but the bulk of the volume is from 1610 to 1660, and that is indexed here.

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Colonists and adventurers
 (1610-1660)
Official Papers (1683)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State as well as other miscellaneous records. This covers June to September 1683.

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Official Papers
 (1683)
State Papers Domestic (1683)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted in the office of the Secretary of State, as well as other miscellaneous records. This calendar of the records from 1 January to 30 June 1683 was prepared by F H Blackburne Daniell, and published in 1933. It covers material from State Papers Domestic, Charles II, 359, 422-426; Various 9 and 12; Entry Books 50, 53-57, 63, 66, 68-69, 164, 335; Signet Office 1 vol II; King William's Chest 3; State Papers Scotland Warrant Books 7 and 8; State Papers Ireland 341, 343 and Entry Book 1; State Papers Channel Islands 1; and Admiralty 77 (Greenwich Hospital, Newsletters, Original), 2.

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State Papers Domestic
 (1683)
House of Lords Proceedings (1689-1690)
Private bills dealing with divorce, disputed and entailed estates: petitions, reports and commissions: naturalisation proceedings.

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House of Lords Proceedings
 (1689-1690)
Hastings family correspondence (1528-1699)
John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, of which this is the second volume, published in 1930, Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work being completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley. This volume covers four categories of the records: correspondence of the Hastings family 1528 to 1699; newsletters sent by professional reporters in London 1669 to 1693; papers relating to the Band of Gentlemen Pensioners, of which Theophilus 7th earl of Huntingdon was captaon, 1677 to 1685; and correspondence of the Rawdon family, 1641 to 1694, including papers of George Monck, afterwards Duke of Albemarle, when commanding in Ulster.

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Hastings family correspondence
 (1528-1699)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1748)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship.

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1748)
National ArchivesApprentices (1758)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 1 January to 31 December 1758.

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Apprentices
 (1758)
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