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Frink Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'frink'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 11 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Connecticut (1762-1767)
The minutes of the 'General Assembly of the Governor and Company of His Majesty's English Colony of Connecticut in New England in America' from page 447 to the end of volume IX, and pages 1 to 310 of volume X, transcribed and edoted by Charles J. Hoadly, State Librarian, were printed at Hartford in 1881. The record of each assembly commences with a list of officers, and of the representatives or deputies of the freemen of the several towns in the colony. There are then elections and appointments of officers for the ensuing year, including justices of the peace for each county; general enactments; and then the results of deliberations on private petitions.

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Inhabitants of Connecticut
 (1762-1767)
National ArchivesMasters of apprentices registered in Devonshire (1772)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Bristol return. Each entry has two scans, the other being the facing page with the details of the indenture, length of service, and payment of duty.) IR 1/58

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Masters of apprentices registered in Devonshire
 (1772)
Soldiers, administrators, refugees and merchants in America (1782-1783)
These are the headquarters papers of sir Guy Carleton, British commander-in-chief during the American war of independence. Many of the individuals recorded were part of the British military administration, but others are refugees and merchants whose lives had been disrupted by the conflict. These records cover July 1782 to March 1783.

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Soldiers, administrators, refugees and merchants in America
 (1782-1783)
Soldiers, administrators, refugees and merchants in America (1783)
These are the headquarters papers of sir Guy Carleton, British commander-in-chief at the end of the American war of independence. Many of the individuals recorded were part of the British military administration, but others are refugees and merchants whose lives had been disrupted by the conflict. These records cover April to December 1783.

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Soldiers, administrators, refugees and merchants in America
 (1783)
Masters of British Merchantmen (1834)
Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping was established in 1834, following the demise of two earlier societies for registering shipping in Britain. The new register in 1834 was created from an alphabetical list of British ships with no more detail than name, master's name, tonnage, and port to which they belonged. Lloyd's insurance syndicate provided 1000 for the establishment of a new system of surveyors, and as the year progressed many of the entries in the register were then annotated with additional information - type of vessel (Bk, barque; Bg, brig; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; Lr, lugger; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow; Yt, yacht), place and year of build, owners, destined voyage, and classification of the vessel and its stores, with the month (indicated by the final number in the last column) of inspection. Underneath each of these amended entries details were given of construction and repair, with year - s., sheathed; d., doubled; C., coppered; I. B., iron bolts; s. M., sheathed with marine metal; s. Y. M., sheathed with yellow metal; F., felt; PH., patent hair; Cl., clincher; len., lengthened; lrp., large repairs; trp., thorough repairs; ND., new deck; M. TSds., new top-sides; W. C., wales cased; NW., new wales; Srprs, some repairs - and, in italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; Bh, beech; C., cedar; E., elm; F., fir; G., gum; Ght., greenheart; Hk., hackmatack; L., locust; L. O., live oak; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; R. P., red pine; Y. P., yellow pine; S., spruce; T., teak; W. O., white oak. The sample scan is from the main list. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. This is the index to masters in the main list. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. These new masters are also included in this index.

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Masters of British Merchantmen
 (1834)
Masters of Merchantmen (1852-1853)
Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping was issued annually, listing ships that had been surveyed preparatory to being insured. This is the register issued 1 July 1852 and then annotated as ships were re-surveyed through to 30 June 1853. The ships were numbered by the first letter of their name, and then by number alphabetically through the ships' names and within ships of the same name alphabetically by surname of the master. After the name of the ship there is the type of vessel (Bk, barque; Bg, brig; Bn, brigantine; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; Lr, lugger; Pol, polacre; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Stm, steamer; Sw, snow; Yt, yacht), master's name (as at the time of the last survey); tonnage; place and year of build; owners; port belonging to; destined voyage; number of years first assigned; and character for hull and stores (e. g., A 1), with the year or month (e. g., 50 for 1850, or 2 for February 1852) of inspection. Underneath some entries details were given of construction and repair, with year - s., sheathed; d., doubled; C., coppered; I. B., iron bolts; c. f., copper fastened; M., sheathed with marine metal; Y. M., sheathed with yellow metal; G., sheathed with galvanised iron; Z., sheathed with zinc; F., felt; C. lm., coppered to light water or ballast mark; C. T., copper bolts substituted for treenails; Cl., clincher; len., lengthened; lrp., large repairs; trp., thorough repairs; Drp., damage repaired; ND., new deck; N TSds., new top-sides; W. C., wales cased; NW., new wales; NB., new bottom; NK., new keel; plk, Plank; N Klsn, new kelson; alm. rb., almost rebuilt; pt O. M., part old materials (timbers or plank); Srprs, some repairs - and, in italics, the timber of the ship is described - A, ash; B B, black birch; Bh, beech; C, cedar; E, elm; F, fir; G, gum; Ght, greenheart; Hk, hackmatack; Hm, hemlock; L, locust; Lh, larch; L O, live oak; M, mahogany; P, pine; P P, pitch pine; R P, red pine; Y P, yellow pine; S, spruce; T, teak; Tam, tamarac; W H, witch hazel; W O, white oak. The sample scan is from the main list. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. This is the index to masters in the main list. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. These new masters are also included in this index. It should be borne in mind that the masters in the main list are those at the time of the respective previous survey for each ship, not necessarily as of 1 July 1852.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1852-1853)
Masters and Mates of Merchantmen: Certificates of Competency (1857)
The Mercantile Navy List and Annual Appendage to the Commercial Code of Signals for All Nations, edited by J. H. Brown, was published By Authority in 1857. It includes this full list of 'Masters and Mates who have passed their examination and obtained Certificates of Competency', from number 1 to number 15816, except for those whose certificates had been cancelled. The first column gives the number of certificate; the second column full name, surname first (an asterisk before the name denotes those who are found qualified to act in fore and aft-rigged vessels only; two vertical lines denotes in North Wales fishery only; a double dagger, passed the examination in steam; and a dagger refers to honorary testimonials, details of which are printed at the end of the section. A B C D are the distinguishing letters for the four classes of Meteorological Observers); third column, class examined (1 ex, 1, 2 and 3 denote First Extra, First, Second and Third Class Master's Certificate, granted under the Voluntary Examination, by Order in Council dated August 1845; Ex C, Master Extra; O C, Master Ordinary; 1 M, First Mate; O M, Only Mate; 2 M, Second Mate; L. R. N., Lieutenant Royal Navy; M. R. N., Master Royal Navy; E. I. C., East India Company; M. I. N., Master Indian Navy.); fourth column, year of certificate (where there are two dots, this is to represent a 'ditto' to the year next above); fifth column, Examining Board (Aberdeen, Belfast, Bristol, Cork, Dublin, Dundee, Glasgow, Greenock, Hull, Leith, Liverpool, London, Newcastle, Plymouth, Shields or Sunderland).

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Masters and Mates of Merchantmen: Certificates of Competency
 (1857)
Patentees of New Inventions (1869)
Index of patentees and applicants for patents of inventions in 1869: giving full name of patentee (surname first); number of patent (in bold); date (within 1869); and subject-matter. Where the patentee was acting as agent for third parties, their names are given in italics in the subject-matter column.

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Patentees of New Inventions
 (1869)
Boys entering Sherborne School (1913)
The grammar school at Sherborne in Dorset, which doubtless existed from the creation of the diocese of Sherborne in 705, was refounded by king Edward VI in 1550. At the quatercentenary in 1950, a fourth edition of the Sherborne Register was published, listing boys entering the school during those four centuries. In truth, the materials for this register survive but fitfully before 1823; for some years, no names are known; sometimes all that is known is a surname. But from 1823 onwards the lists and the details get steadily more comprehensive. By the 20th century the boys are listed alphabetically by surname under term of entrance. Surname is given in bold, then christian names, name of father (surname and initials) and address; year of birth; house (a, School House; b, Abbey House; c, The Green; d, Harper House (formerly The Retreat); f, Abbeylands; g, Lyon House; h, Westcott House); whether represented the school at cricket (xi), football (xv), shooting (viii), &c.; year of leaving; summary of degrees, career &c.; and (in italics), address as of 1950. Names in the early lists marked with an asterisk are found inscribed on the oak panelling or on the stone walls of the former schoolroom. (F) in the lists indicates a foundationer, receiving free education: after 1827, when this privilege was restricted to boys from Sherborne and neighbourhood, nearly all foundationers were day-boys.

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Boys entering Sherborne School
 (1913)
Officers of the British Army and of the Indian Army (1934)
The Half-Yearly Army List, issued By Authority, 30 June 1934, lists all officers in active service at that date, and this list was evidence of the status and rank of the officers contained in it. The entries are set out as a gradation list, by rank, from field-marshals to lieutenants, and within each rank in order of seniority at that rank. Each officer's name (surname first, in capitals, then christian name and present rank (with date of achieving that rank) and regiment &c. are given, for convenience, in bold type, with any national decorations in italics after the name. Each entry also gives date of birth, number of days service in the ranks, dates of service in each rank of officer, particular offices and postings (with dates) and, where appropriate, a summary of war service, and medals. For all but the oldest of the officers then serving, the war service details are for the Great War (1914-1921), and campaigns in Iraq, Waziristan, and the North West Frontier of India. War services are not given in this edition for Indian Army officers, except in that their entries are preceded by a crossed swords symbol where they have seen war service in a theatre of war overseas. After the gradation list of officers, there is a section for the Royal Malta Artillery; and then (pages 1152 to 1185) warrant officers - staff or garrison serjeant-majors, educational serjeant-majors, serjeant-major (physical training and educational) instructors, regimental serjeant-majors (and corporal-majors, farrier-serjeant majors, master gunners, assistant instructors in gunnery, experimental serjeant-majors, artillery clerks, farrier-serjeant-majors, artificer serjeant-majors, clerks of works, mechanist, superintending clerks, draughtsmen, 1st class staff serjeant-majors, transport, supply, conductors, sub-conductors, armourers, armament artificers, headmasters, schoolmasters, marine gunners, and bandmasters. The section for the Royal Army Chaplains' Department lists all chaplains (1st to 3rd class); and that for Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service has all matrons, sisters and staff nurses. The lists of nurses do not give date of birth: all are unmarried. The book concludes with the Yeomen of the Guard, the Honourable Company of Gentlemen-at-Arms, and the King's Body Guard for Scotland, in each case giving name (surname and initials, not christian names), honours, name of late regiment, and date of appointment.

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Officers of the British Army and of the Indian Army
 (1934)
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