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Frie Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'frie'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Pipe Roll (1241-1242)
The Great Rolls of the Pipe are the central record of the crown compiling returns of income and expenditure from the sheriffs and farmers of the various English counties or shires. This is the oldest series of public records, and the earliest surviving instances of many surnames are found in the Pipe Rolls. This is the roll for the 26th year of the reign of king Henry III, that is, accounting for the year from Michaelmas 1241 to Michaelmas 1242. Most (but not all) of the entries in which names appear relate to payments for grants of land and fines or pardons arising from the proceedings of the justices. The text was edited by Henry Lewin Cannon for Yale Historical Publications and printed in 1918. The name of the county is given at the head of each page, and variant spellings, omissions and additions found in the duplicate Chancellor's Roll [C. R.] are given in the footnotes.

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Pipe Roll
 (1241-1242)
Wiltshire Feet of Fines (1273-1326)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Wiltshire. These abstracts were prepared by R. B. Pugh for the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society Records Branch and published in 1939, under the title 'Abstracts of Feet of Fines relating to Wiltshire for the Reigns of Edward I and Edward II'. Pugh made abstracts not only of the Wiltshire feet of fines for the two reigns but also of the Wiltshire content of those feet of fines covering two or more counties, which are archived separately under 'Divers Counties'. Each entry starts with a sequential number within the regnal year. The date then given is the date on which the original writ was returnable in court, rather than the date on which proceedings were completed. The dates do not fall on the quarter days themselves (Michaelmas, Hilary, Easter and Trinity) but on the octave (oct., 7 days after), quindene (quin., 14 days after), or three weeks later, &c. Then there is the name of the party initiating the action (X: pl., plaintiff, or dem., demandant), and then that of the defendant (def.) or impedient (imp.) (Y). Then there is a summary description of the land involved; and then a code indicating the precise nature of the action. Seven of these (A. to G.) are variants on the theme of X having acknowledged the premises to be the right of Y; but H. indicates a simple complete grant from X to Y, complete with actual transfer of possession. In cases B., C., E. and G. it is X, not Y, on whom the property is settled. If there is a warranty clause, or a more involved settlement, the details are given.

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Wiltshire Feet of Fines
 (1273-1326)
Clerks and Clergy in Cornwall and Devon (1307-1326)
The register of bishop Walter de Stapeldon of Exeter, containing general diocesan business, but in particular including ordination lists for monks and clergy. Only a small proportion of the clerks went on to acquire benefices and remained celibate. Latin

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Clerks and Clergy in Cornwall and Devon
 (1307-1326)
Fine Rolls (1377-1383)
The fine rolls of the 1st to 6th years of the reign of king Richard II record part of the government administration in England, with orders sent out day by day to individual officers, and commitment of particular responsibilities and duties. There is also some material relating to Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Fine Rolls
 (1377-1383)
Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset (1001-1500)
Three early registers of the dean and chapter of Wells - the Liber Albus I (White Book; R I), Liber Albus II (R III), and Liber Ruber (Red Book; R II, section i) - were edited by W. H. B. Bird for the Historical Manuscripts Commissioners and published in 1907. These three books comprise, with some repetition, a cartulary of possessions of the cathedral, with grants of land dating back as early as the 8th century, well before the development of hereditary surnames in England; acts of the dean and chapter; and surveys of their estates, mostly in Somerset.

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Early records of Wells cathedral, in Somerset
 (1001-1500)
Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

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Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1660-1679)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the allegation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage. This index also includes marriage licence allegations for the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, 1558 to 1699.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1660-1679)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1779)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1779)
National ArchivesOutstanding soldiers of the 17th (Leicestershire) Regiment of Foot (1875-1881)
Each year the best soldiers of the regiment were chosen for long service and good conduct medals. This register gives rank, name, regimental number, and date of recommendation. (The sample scan is from the 34th foot). The register is essentially a register of recommendations, but from 1877-8 onwards there are also details of the issue of the medals. The 1st battalion was based in India throughout this period, and took part in the Afghan war of 1878 to 1879, with the capture of Ali Musjid.

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Outstanding soldiers of the 17th (Leicestershire) Regiment of Foot
 (1875-1881)
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