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Flowerdew Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'flowerdew'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 79 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1575-1577)
The Privy Council of queen Elizabeth was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1575-1577)
The English in Holland and Flanders (1586-1587)
The State Papers Foreign of queen Elizabeth consist mainly of letters and reports concerning England's relations with continental Europe. The inhabitants of the Low Countries were at this period attempting to throw off the Spanish yoke, and Elizabeth sent considerable forces to their aid: the English leader, Robert Dudley earl of Leicester, was offered the governorship of the States General. The papers relating to Holland and Flanders in the State Papers Foreign are so voluminous in consequence, that a separate calendar was edited by Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B. Hinds under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, this volume, covering June 1586 to March 1587, being published in 1927.

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The English in Holland and Flanders
 (1586-1587)
Secretary of State's Papers (1600)
The letters and papers of sir Robert Cecil, Secretary of State, deal with all manner of government business in England, Ireland and abroad.

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Secretary of State's Papers
 (1600)
London Marriage Allegations (1521-1610)
London, Essex and part of Hertfordshire lay within the diocese of London. In the later 17th century the individual archdeaconry courts issued marriage licences, but for this period the only surviving material is from the overarching London Consistory court. The main series of marriage allegations from the consistory court starts 7 December 1597, and these were extracted by Colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester; Colonel Chester then discovered earlier material, back to 5 January 1521, in Vicar-General's Books of the Principal Probate Registry. The notices in these books were much briefer, but as well as extending back so much earlier, they included additional material for 1597 onwards. All this he collated with the consistory court extracts, and the text was edited by George J. Armytage and published by the Harleian Society in 1887. A typical later entry will give date; name, address and occupation of groom; name, address and condition of his intended bride, and/or, where she is a spinster, her father's name, address and occupation. Lastly we have the name of the church where the wedding was going to take place; or the words Gen. Lic. signifying a general or open licence.

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London Marriage Allegations
 (1521-1610)
Ancient Funeral Monuments in Norfolk (1631)
John Weever compiled, by travel and study, this collection of 'Ancient Fvnerall Monvments within the Vnited Monarchie of Great Britaine, Ireland, and the Islands adiacent, with the dissolued Monasteries therein contained: their Founders, and what eminent Persons haue beene in the same interred. As also the death and bvriall of certaine of the Blood Royall; the Nobilitie and Gentrie of these Kingdomes entombed in forraine Nations. A worke reuiuing the dead memory of the Royall Progenie, the Nobilitie, Gentrie, and Communaltie, of these his Maiesties Dominions. Intermixed and illustrated with variety of Historicall obseruations, annotations, and briefe notes, extracted out of approued Authors, infallible Records, Lieger Bookes, Charters, Rolls, old Manuscripts, and the Collections of iudicious Antiquaries. Whereunto is prefixed a Discourse of Funerall Monuments. Of the Foundation and fall of Religious Houses. Of Religious Orders. Of the Ecclesiasticall estate of England. And of other occurrences touched vpon by the way, in the whole passage of these intended labours.' Although he was working before the iconoclasms of the Commonwealth period, the mediaeval memorials that he sought to record were already often mutilated and decayed, the inscriptions illegible or fragmentary, and many of those that he found recorded by earlier antiquaries had completely disappeared. His collection includes not merely physical monuments, but also, where he could find them, burial records and obits from the earlier centuries. This part of his work covers Norfolk.

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Ancient Funeral Monuments in Norfolk
 (1631)
Irish petitions, memoranda and correspondence (1606-1663)
John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, in three volumes; Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work was completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley, who also produced a fourth volume, published in 1947, by which time the manuscripts themselves had gone to the Henry E. Huntington Library at San Marino in California. This volume covers nine categories of the records, of which much, but not all, relates to Ireland: Correspondence of sir John Davies (Solicitor-General for Ireland 1603-1606 and Attorney-General for Ireland 1606-1619) (pages 1-17); Warrants, Petitions, &c., relating to Ireland, 1604-1618 and 1634 (18-54); Correspondence of John Bramhall (Bishop of Derry 1634-1660 and Archbishop of Armagh 1660-1663) (55-136); Petitions, Orders and Miscellaneius Documents mostly relating to the Episcopate of John Bramhall (137-152); Other Miscellaneous Irish Papers (153-185), including a particularly valuable Survey of the Undertakers and Servitors planted in Ulster between 2 February and 25 April 1613 (159-182); Royal Letters and Letters from the Lords of the Council, &c., mostly to the Earls of Huntingdon as Lords Lieutenant of Leicestershire and Rutland, and other Documents relating chiefly to County Affairs (186-221); Notes on Speeches and Proceedings in the House of Lords 1610-1621 and 1670-1695 (222-324); Later Miscellaneous and Additional Papers (325-358); and Letters and Papers of the Graham Family, chiefly relating to the disposal of the estates and titles of the Earls of Airth and Menteith and proposals for the marriage of Helen, daughter of sir James Graham.

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Irish petitions, memoranda and correspondence
 (1606-1663)
Allegations for marriages in southern England (1679-1687)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop, exercised through his vicar-general. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. The abstracts of the allegations given here usually state name, address (street in London, or parish), age, and condition of bride and groom; and sometimes the name, address and occupation of the friend or relative filing the occupation. Where parental consent was necessary, a mother's or father's name may be given. The ages shown should be treated with caution; ages above 21 tended to be reduced, doubtless for cosmetic reasons; ages under 21 tended to be increased, particularly to avoid requiring parental consent; a simple statement 'aged 21' may merely mean 'of full age' and indicate any age from 21 upwards. These are merely allegations to obtain licences; although nearly all will have resulted in the issuing of the licence, many licences did not then result in marriage.

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Allegations for marriages in southern England
 (1679-1687)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
National ArchivesMasters of Apprentices registered at Norwich in Norfolk (1715-1717)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1714. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Masters of Apprentices registered at Norwich in Norfolk
 (1715-1717)
National ArchivesApprentices registered in Suffolk (1717-1719)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. Because of the delay before some collectors made their returns, this register includes indentures and articles from as early as 1716. (The sample entry shown on this scan is taken from a Norfolk return)

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Apprentices registered in Suffolk
 (1717-1719)
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