Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Flinte Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'flinte'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 7 records (displaying 1 to 7): 

Buy all
Get all 7 records to view, to save and print for £32.00

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Acolytes Secular (1507)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 29 May 1507, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Longdon prebendal church.

FLINTE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Acolytes Secular
 (1507)
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular (1508)
The diocese of Coventry and Lichfield at this period included the whole of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire; all Lancashire south of the Ribble; northern Shropshire (including Shrewsbury); and northern Warwickshire (including Birmingham and Coventry). Ordinations took place on the four Ember Saturdays in the year, and on certain other occasions; lists of ordinands to the degrees of acolyte, subdeacon, deacon and priest were preserved in the ordination registers, a distinction being made between those clerks who were 'regular', i. e., monks, friars, &c., and those who were 'secular', the main body of the clergy. All ordinands were celibate, and those regular, and the secular who obtained benefices, remained so, but only a minority of the secular ordinands ever obtained benefices, and most will doubtless have married later in life. No man might be ordained to subdeacon or higher without proving either that he was of independent means or that he was sponsored by an institution or a gentleman. Most entries in the register of such ordinations therefore have the words 'ad titulum' followed by the name of the religious house that was the sponsor. This is an important indication of the man's origins - boys whose families were monastic tenants, and who were educated by the monks, would naturally be sponsored by the abbey. Only men who were born and bred in the diocese could be ordained by the bishop, unless producing letters dimissory from the bishop of the diocese of their birth. These are the ordinations celebrated on Ember Saturday, 17 June 1508, by Thomas bishop of Panados (Pavados), suffragan of bishop Geoffrey Blythe, in Lichfield cathedral.

FLINTE. Cost: £8.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Lichfield Diocese Ordinations: Deacons Secular
 (1508)
Wills proved at York: Names of Testators (1627-1637)
The diocese of York comprised most of Yorkshire, and Nottinghamshire: the York Exchequer court was the ordinary probate jurisdiction for the Yorkshire part of the diocese, but some wills from Nottinghamshire and other parts of the province of York were also proved there. Dr Francis Collins compiled this index to the transcribed wills of the Prerogative and Exchequer Courts in the York registry proved from 1627 to 1637. The date on the left is that of probate; the testator's full name is then given (surname first), parish or place of abode, and sometimes occupation, and date that the will was executed; and volume and folio number where it the transcript commences. The Act Books were used by Dr Collins to supply deficiencies in the information from the transcripts.

FLINTE. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Wills proved at York: Names of Testators
 (1627-1637)
Irish petitions, memoranda and correspondence (1606-1663)
John Harley of the Historical Manuscripts Commission was invited by Reginald Rawdon Hastings to examine his family's extensive archives at the Manor House, Ashby de la Zouche, in Leicestershire. Harley produced a detailed calendar, in three volumes; Hastings himself having since died, and Harley having been killed at Gallipoli, the work was completed by his colleague, Francis Bickley, who also produced a fourth volume, published in 1947, by which time the manuscripts themselves had gone to the Henry E. Huntington Library at San Marino in California. This volume covers nine categories of the records, of which much, but not all, relates to Ireland: Correspondence of sir John Davies (Solicitor-General for Ireland 1603-1606 and Attorney-General for Ireland 1606-1619) (pages 1-17); Warrants, Petitions, &c., relating to Ireland, 1604-1618 and 1634 (18-54); Correspondence of John Bramhall (Bishop of Derry 1634-1660 and Archbishop of Armagh 1660-1663) (55-136); Petitions, Orders and Miscellaneius Documents mostly relating to the Episcopate of John Bramhall (137-152); Other Miscellaneous Irish Papers (153-185), including a particularly valuable Survey of the Undertakers and Servitors planted in Ulster between 2 February and 25 April 1613 (159-182); Royal Letters and Letters from the Lords of the Council, &c., mostly to the Earls of Huntingdon as Lords Lieutenant of Leicestershire and Rutland, and other Documents relating chiefly to County Affairs (186-221); Notes on Speeches and Proceedings in the House of Lords 1610-1621 and 1670-1695 (222-324); Later Miscellaneous and Additional Papers (325-358); and Letters and Papers of the Graham Family, chiefly relating to the disposal of the estates and titles of the Earls of Airth and Menteith and proposals for the marriage of Helen, daughter of sir James Graham.

FLINTE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Irish petitions, memoranda and correspondence
 (1606-1663)
Testators and legatees in London (1358-1688)
The Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1890. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. The bulk of the wills in this volume are from before 1600.

FLINTE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Testators and legatees in London
 (1358-1688)
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences (1577-1700)
Nottingham Archdeaconry, which was almost coextensive with the county of Nottingham, lay in the diocese and province of York, but it had substantially independent jurisdiction for both probate and the issuing of marriage licences. These are abstracts of the archdeaconry marriage licences: they usually state the groom's address, occupation, age, and condition; the bride's address, age and condition; and the names of the churches or parishes at which it was intended the marriage would be celebrated. Not all licences led to marriages. Where the age given is 21, it should be construed as '21 or over'. There was no obligation for the marriage to take place at the parish suggested, but the licence would only be valid within the county. These abstracts have been annotated with extra information found on the marriage bonds. 26 Nottinghamshire parishes (Beckingham, Darlton, Dunham, Eaton, North Leverton, Ragnall, Rampton, South Wheatley, Cropwell Bishop, Bleasby, Blidworth, Calverton, Caunton, Edingley, Farnsfield, Halloughton, Holme, Kirklington, Morton, North Muskham, Norwell, Oxton, South Muskham, Southwell, Upton and Woodborough) lay within the small peculiar jurisdiction of Southwell, which issued its own licences: abstracts of these for the period 1588 to 1754 are also included here.

FLINTE. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Nottinghamshire Marriage Licences
 (1577-1700)
Tradesmen of York (1559-1759)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city. Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 16,600 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year. Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen (per patres); and a handful who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

FLINTE. Cost: £2.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Tradesmen of York
 (1559-1759)
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.