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Fine Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fine'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 39 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Feet of Fines for Dorset (1195-1214)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in the county. This transcript was prepared for the Commissioners of the Public Records by Joseph Hunter, and printed in 1844. It covers entries for the county from the surviving rolls from the 7th year of the reign of king Richard I to the 16th year of king John.

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Feet of Fines for Dorset
 (1195-1214)
House of Lords Proceedings (1689-1690)
Private bills dealing with divorce, disputed and entailed estates: petitions, reports and commissions: naturalisation proceedings.

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House of Lords Proceedings
 (1689-1690)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
Wandsworth Brides (1740)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The marriage registers rarely give more information than the date of the wedding, and the names of bride and groom. From 1662 onwards it was normally indicated whether a marriage was by banns or by licence. Surrey archdeaconry marriage bonds &c. survive from 1674 onwards.

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Wandsworth Brides
 (1740)
Owners of Merchantmen (1822)
The Society for the Registry of Shipping was instituted in 1760, and published an annual register and supplement. The annual register consisted of an alphabetical list of ships surveyed for insurance in Britain and Ireland, together with an alphabetical supplement. The society maintained a Registry Office at which alterations and additions were notified, and members delivering their registers when called for had them updated and returned on the following or the ensuing day. Each ship was given a number within each letter of the alphabet: ships' names were not unique, so within each name a ship was identified by the name of the captain or master at the time of the last survey. Then abbreviations indicate the type of vessel (Bg, brig; Bk, barque; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Sw, snow), and whether sheathed (s) and/or doubled (d) with copper (C) and iron bolts (I B) or over boards (W & C), patent felt (P F), copper fastened (c f), copper bolted (c b), or copper repaired (C rp) sometimes with a date, such as (18)18. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. It will be borne in mind that these are the names of the masters not (necessarily) in 1822, but at the time of the last survey. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. In the fourth column is the tonnage: where there is a blank under the number this indicates that the ship had two decks; more often the letters S D (B) for single deck (with beams); D W for deep waist; S D W single deck with deep waist; B D W single deck with beams and deep waist. Underneath the entry may run references to recent repairs: Cl. clincher built; Drp. damages repaired; grp. good repair; len. lengthened; lrp. large repair; N. (new) B. bottom, D. deck, Kl. keel, Sds. sides or UW. upper-works; rb. rebuilt; rsd. raised; Srprs. some repairs; or trp. thorough repair. In italics, the timber of the ship is described - B. B., black birch; C., cedar; H., hazel; Hk., hackmetack; J., juniper; L. O., live oak; M., mahogany; P., pine; P. P., pitch pine; S., spruce; W. H., witch hazel; W. O., white oak. The fifth column gives the place that the ship was built. For foreign ships this may be as vague as 'Dutch' or 'French'; but nothing in this record specifically indicates the nationality of ship, master or owners, except that an A. under the owner's name indicates that the vessel was American property. The sixth column gives the year of the ship's age; a few were still sailing after 30 or 40 years. The seventh column gives the owner's name, abbreviated in the same way as the master's name. Where the master was the owner, the word Capt. will appear. With vessels owned abroad, the name in this column is sometimes that of the port of origin, not the surname of the owner. Where there has been a change of owner by the time of re-survey, the new name is put underneath in smaller type. The printer sought to avoid confusion by aligning names of ports to the left and surnames to the right, but that leaves longer names doubtful. The eighth column gives the feet of the draught of water when loaded. The ninth column shows the destined voyage for which the survey took place, with the port of survey abbreviated (Be., Belfast; Br., Bristol; Co., Cork; Cs, Cowes; Da., Dartmouth; Du., Dublin; Eh, Exmouth; Ex., Exeter; Fa., Falmouth; Gr., Greenock; Hl, Hull; Hn, Harrington; La., Lancaster; Lh, Leith; Li., Liverpool; Lo., London; Ly., Lynn; Mt., Maryport; Po., Poole; Ph, Portsmouth; Pl., Plymouth; Sc., Star-Cross; Tn., Teignmouth; Tp., Topsham; Wa., Waterford; Wn, Whitehaven; Wo., Workington; Ya., Yarmouth), and the letter C where the vessel was a constant trader between the two ports. The tenth column gives the classification of the vessel (A, first; E, second) and its stores (1, first; 2, second) and the year of survey, e. g. 09 for 1809, or, if surveyed during 1821, the month, e. g. 3 for March. Where the vessel has been re-surveyed, the classification letter and number will be repeated or revised in the final column. The sample scan is from the main list. This is the index to owners in the main list and the supplement.

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Owners of Merchantmen
 (1822)
Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers (1851)
The London Mercantile Journal and Colonial Advocate, a weekly newspaper, published a report entitled Ships Entered Outwards, listing vessels registered with customs in the Port of London as preparing to leave for abroad. Under each day's heading each entry gives, first, the main port of destination; then the name of the ship; then the surname of the captain; nationality of the ship (e. g., B for British, D for Dutch, &c.); tonnage; the dock (e. g., W I D for West India Dock); and the name of the shipper or agent. These are the returns for October 1851. (The sample scan is from February)

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Masters of Merchantmen and Shippers
 (1851)
Masters of Merchantmen (1852-1853)
Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping was issued annually, listing ships that had been surveyed preparatory to being insured. This is the register issued 1 July 1852 and then annotated as ships were re-surveyed through to 30 June 1853. The ships were numbered by the first letter of their name, and then by number alphabetically through the ships' names and within ships of the same name alphabetically by surname of the master. After the name of the ship there is the type of vessel (Bk, barque; Bg, brig; Bn, brigantine; Cr, cutter; Dr, dogger; G, galliott; H, hoy; K, ketch; Lr, lugger; Pol, polacre; S, ship; Sk, smack; Sp, sloop; Sr, schooner; St, schoot; Stm, steamer; Sw, snow; Yt, yacht), master's name (as at the time of the last survey); tonnage; place and year of build; owners; port belonging to; destined voyage; number of years first assigned; and character for hull and stores (e. g., A 1), with the year or month (e. g., 50 for 1850, or 2 for February 1852) of inspection. Underneath some entries details were given of construction and repair, with year - s., sheathed; d., doubled; C., coppered; I. B., iron bolts; c. f., copper fastened; M., sheathed with marine metal; Y. M., sheathed with yellow metal; G., sheathed with galvanised iron; Z., sheathed with zinc; F., felt; C. lm., coppered to light water or ballast mark; C. T., copper bolts substituted for treenails; Cl., clincher; len., lengthened; lrp., large repairs; trp., thorough repairs; Drp., damage repaired; ND., new deck; N TSds., new top-sides; W. C., wales cased; NW., new wales; NB., new bottom; NK., new keel; plk, Plank; N Klsn, new kelson; alm. rb., almost rebuilt; pt O. M., part old materials (timbers or plank); Srprs, some repairs - and, in italics, the timber of the ship is described - A, ash; B B, black birch; Bh, beech; C, cedar; E, elm; F, fir; G, gum; Ght, greenheart; Hk, hackmatack; Hm, hemlock; L, locust; Lh, larch; L O, live oak; M, mahogany; P, pine; P P, pitch pine; R P, red pine; Y P, yellow pine; S, spruce; T, teak; Tam, tamarac; W H, witch hazel; W O, white oak. The sample scan is from the main list. The third column, reserved for masters' names, is not particularly wide; with short surnames, an initial will be given; but longer surnames omit the initials, and even longer surnames are abbreviated. This is the index to masters in the main list. Often new masters had been appointed by the time of re-survey, and their names are added in slightly smaller type under the original master's names in the third column. These new masters are also included in this index. It should be borne in mind that the masters in the main list are those at the time of the respective previous survey for each ship, not necessarily as of 1 July 1852.

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Masters of Merchantmen
 (1852-1853)
Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts (1880)
Bills of sale (binding assets to a creditor/lender), insolvencies and bankruptcies in England and Wales, January to March 1880

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Debtors, Insolvents and Bankrupts
 (1880)
Money lenders and other creditors (1880)
Bills of sale transferred title in all property of a debtor to a specified creditor. Possession of a bill of sale thus protected a money lender or other creditor from losing a debtor's property to other creditors (except landlords) in case of insolvency or bankruptcy; and in many cases signing a bill of sale was a required step for a borrower securing a loan. The bill of sale specified the amount thereby secured, but could be open, i. e., allow for further drawings on the same account. Entries from the official register of bills of sales in England and Wales were published in Flint & Co.'s London Manchester and Dublin Mercantile Gazette, a weekly publication available only by subscription, issued under the motto "Security in Crediting". The entries are listed by county, then alphabetically by debtor, surname first, with address, trade, the name of the creditor ('in whose favour'), dates of issue and filing, and amount. An &c. after the amount indicates an open bill. The creditors that appear in the 'in whose favour' column are mainly, but not exclusively, loan companies and individual money lenders, and Jewish names figure prominently among the latter. When a loan was paid off, satisfaction of the bill of sale was entered on the register, and these satisfactions are also recorded in these pages. 1 January to 31 March 1880.

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Money lenders and other creditors
 (1880)
Naturalizations (1899)
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1899, refer to naturalizations from December 1898 to November 1899.

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Naturalizations
 (1899)
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