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Figge Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'figge'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 16 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Curia Regis Rolls (1194-1199)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period. This transcript of the rolls for October to December 1194 and October 1198 to July 1199 were edited by sir Francis Palgrave for the Commissioners of the Public Records. Most entries have the name of the county in the lefthand margin.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1194-1199)
Lancashire Assizes (1202-1285)
All the surviving records of the assizes held by the royal justices in eyre (itinerant) in Lancashire during this period were extracted by colonel John Parker and published by the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society from 1904. The justices not only tried all civil actions outstanding on their advent, pleas of the crown and common pleas, but also interrogated the juries of each wapentake and borough as to the Capitula Itineries, the Articles of the Eyre, inquiring into the king's proprietary rights, escheats, wardships, and questions of maladministration. Only a dozen complete rolls survive for this period; but Appendix I (pp. 218-253) gathers together from the Patent Rolls of the reign of Henry III (1216-1272) a schedule of Lancashire assizes for which justices were assigned; and Appendix II (306-342) adds the fines and amercements before the justices during that reign, as recorded on the Pipe Rolls.

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Lancashire Assizes
 (1202-1285)
Inhabitants of London (1375-1399)
Letter Book H of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1375-1399)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1771)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1771)
Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury (1392-1800)
No man or woman could trade in the city of Canterbury without having obtained 'freedom' of the city, unless they paid an annual fee to do so. Admissions of freemen were recorded on the Chamberlains' Accounts of the city, which were prepared annually from Lady Day (25 March) to Lady Day until 1752, and thereafter each set runs from 1 January to 31 December. The accounts for 1392 are incomplete, but thereafter until 1800 there is a complete series except for the years 1455 to 1457 and the year 1552-3. Joseph Meadows Cowper, Honorary Librarian to the Corporation, produced this extract of the names from 1392 to 1800, and the volume was privately printed in 1903. There are five groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; those who married a freeman's daughter; those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase; and those who were honoured by a gift of the freedom from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen. Cowper published his lists divided into the five categories: the sample scan is from the list of those who obtained freedom by marriage. This is the index to all the stray names in the records: the wives and father-in-laws by whom freedom was acquired; the masters of apprentices; and other persons mentioned by the way in the record.

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Wives and Masters of Freemen of Canterbury
 (1392-1800)
Glasgow Directory (1835)
'The Post-Office Annual Directory For 1835-56: Containing An Alphabetical List of the Merchants, Traders, Manufacturers, and Principal Inhabitants: And A Second List of the Names of Merchants, Manufacturers and Traders, in Glasgow and Suburbs, Classed and Arranged under Each Distinct Head of Trade or Profession with A Street Directory: And An Appendix, Containing Many Useful Lists' was published in Glasgow in 1835. This main alphabetical section is from page 21 to 253, and comprises about 11,000 entries.

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Glasgow Directory
 (1835)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.

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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
Bankruptcy Meetings (1844)
Meetings about bankrupts' estates in England and Wales

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Bankruptcy Meetings
 (1844)
Bankrupts in England and Wales petitioning for discharge (1845)
Perry's Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, issued monthly, included lists of bankruptcies and stages in the liquidation of the estate, payment of dividends, and discharge. Towards the end of the process there was a Meeting for Allowance of Certificates, where the bankrupt applied for a certificate of discharge. This meeting sometimes took place many years after the bankruptcy procedure started: the details given are the year originally gazetted, name (surname first), address, and trade; and the date and time of the hearing. This is the index to the names of the bankrupts, from the issues from January to December 1845.

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Bankrupts in England and Wales petitioning for discharge
 (1845)
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