Search between and
BasketGBP GBP
0 items£0.00
Click here to change currency

Ferry Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'ferry'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 171 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

Open Access
Buying all 171 results of this search individually would cost £990.00. But you can have free access to all 171 records for a year, to view, to save and print, for £100. Save £890.00. More...

These sample scans are from the original record. You will get scans of the full pages or articles where the surname you searched for has been found.

Your web browser may prevent the sample windows from opening; in this case please change your browser settings to allow pop-up windows from this site.

Court rolls of manors held by Durham priory (1296-1384)
The cathedral priory of Benedictines (black monks) of St Cuthbert at Durham possessed many manors in the county. These were administered by halmotes, or manor courts, held in three sessions (tourns or turns) each year (here marked I., II. and III.), before the terrar (obedientiary), steward, bursar, and/or the prior himself. The court rolls recording proceedings in these courts survive from 1296, 1300, 1309, and from 1333, but with years missing, until becoming fairly continuous from 1365 onwards. Extracts from the rolls from 1296 to 1384 were edited by John Booth and published by the Surtees Society in 1886. The manors under this jurisdiction were Aycliffe, Bellasis, (Newton) Bewley, Billingham, Burdun, Chilton, Coupon, Dalton, Edmondbyers, Ferry (Hill, or Ferrycliffe), Fulwell, Harton, Hebburn, Hedworth, Hesledon, Heworth, Jarrow, Kirk Merrington, East Merrington, West Merrington and Mid Merrington, Monkton, Moorsley, Newton Ketton, Nunstanton, North and South Pittington, East and West Rainton, Ravensflat, Shields, Southwick, Spen, Usworth, Wallsend, Wardley, Wearmouth, Westoe, Willington and Wolviston. The main contents of the records are demises of land held by the bond tenants, neifs, cotmen and others, and of the demesne lands; and bye-laws and pains (penalties) for breach of these; and other minor delinquencies. Normally, when a farm, cottage or piece of land was let to a new tenant, the name of the last tenant is also given, as well as the amount of the rent, and the amount of the gersum (fine on entry). These court rolls contain some of the only surviving evidence for the inhabitants of these townships in this period: but this publication was of extracts, and was not comprehensive. It should also be noted that the third tourn each year (III.) usually took place in January to March, and so by modern dating in the following year. Thus, the third tourn of 1296 was held on 4 March 1297.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Court rolls of manors held by Durham priory
 (1296-1384)
Officers and tenants of the Scottish crown (1488-1496)
In 1887 the 10th volume of Rotuli Scaccarii Regum Scotorum, or The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, was published in Edinburgh as part of the Scottish Series of Chronicles and Memorials. The main text is a transcript in extended Latin, but with some passages reduced to an abstract in English (in italics), of the rolls of the Scottish royal exchequer from 19 June 1488 to 12 October 1496 (rolls cclxxviii to ccxcv, old numbers ccxciii to cccix). This more or less continuous series alternates between accounts of the Ballivi ad Extra (royal chamberlains, lessees of lordships, rangers of wards, receivers &c) and those of the Custumars (receivers of customary payments and similar revenues) and bailies (bailiffs) of burghs (boroughs). In all, they give a summary description of all these sources of royal revenue - and not only mention the payers and receivers in general, but also refer to many occasional payments to and receipts from individuals hardly otherwise found in the surviving records. An appendix (pages 629 to 763) of rentals of royal property throughout Scotland in the same period gives a rich harvest of personal names; and another (764-772), an Index in Libros Responsionum, lists persons to whom sasine (seisin) was granted in 1492 to 1496.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Officers and tenants of the Scottish crown
 (1488-1496)
Servants of the Scottish crown (1473-1498)
Under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland, the earliest Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland, under the series Compota Thesauriorum Regum Scotorum, were abridged and published. This first volume, prepared by Thomas Dickson, curator of the Historical Department of the General Register House, was published in 1877. It contains the earliest surving accounts, from 1473 to 1474 in the reign of king James III, and the next, from 1488 to 1489 in the reign of king James IV. These were printed verbatim; but there then follow (page 166 onwards) accounts through to 1498 'considerably curtailed by the omission of unimportant entries'. These accounts are mostly lists of royal expenditure: many purchases of items for the court do not give the name of the merchants from whom they were bought, so the bulk of the personal names in the text are those of intermediaries, messengers, and various servants of the king.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Servants of the Scottish crown
 (1473-1498)
Tenants of the Bishop of Durham (1580)
'A Booke of Surveighe and an Abstract out of the Rentale of all the Landes, Tenementes and Revenews that belonge to the Cathedrall' Churche of Durism' with the perfect and perticuler State therof, mayd anno Reginae Elizabethae vicissimo secundo, 1580' was edited by John Booth and printed by the Surtees Society in 1886. The bishopric had an extensive rental in the city and county of Durham; eight places in Northumberland are mentioned; and then there are glebe rentals from rectories in county Durham and Northumberland in the bishop's hands. Greater detail is then given of the tenants of the manors in county Durham held as of the cathedral priory - Aycliffe, Bellasis, (Newton) Bewley, Billingham, Burdun, Chilton, Coupon, Dalton, Edmondbyers, Ferry (Hill, or Ferrycliffe), Fulwell, Harton, Hebburn, Hedworth, Hesledon, Heworth, Jarrow, Kirk Merrington, East Merrington, West Merrington and Mid Merrington, Monkton, Moorsley, Newton Ketton, Nunstanton, North and South Pittington, East and West Rainton, Ravensflat, Shields, Southwick, Spen, Usworth, Wallsend, Wardley, Wearmouth, Westoe, Willington and Wolviston. Finally, there is a list of new leases granted out at lotteries by the late dean of Durham and the prebendaries there; fines received but not yet paid into the cathedral funds; and the names of tenants (of the priory) claiming tenant right and refusing to take leases.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Tenants of the Bishop of Durham
 (1580)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1585-1592)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from 1 August 1585 to 31 July 1592, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson, and published under the direction of the Lord Clerk Register of Scotland in 1881. Some of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, some of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences. But 'horning' was also used in the pursuit of debts: there was no imprisonment for debt in Scotland, but a creditor could have an obstinate debtor ordered, in the sovereign's name, to pay what was due, failing which, the debtor could be put to the horn, denounced as a rebel, and imprisoned as a rebel. The main text (to page 774) is from the Acta Secreti Concilii, containing the minutes of the Privy Council, with intermixed Acta Proper (political edicts), Decreta (judicial decisions), Acta Cautionis (acts of caution) and Bands (registration of bonds). After that are printed some miscellaneous Privy Council documents from the same years: additional acts of caution (775-778); ordinances and acts anent the Borders and the North (779-814); and miscellaneous privy council papers (815-834). The sources most productive of names, the Acta Cautionis and Registration of Bands, are also the most repetitive in form, and are not transcribed verbatim and literatim: nevertheless, one of the editor's rules was for 'All proper names and names of places occurring in the originals to be preserved in the abstracts without exception, and in the exact original spelling.'

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1585-1592)
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners (1592-1599)
The Privy Council of Scotland exercised a superior judicial authority in the kingdom, and consequently received and dealt with a constant stream of petitions, as well as dealing with the internal security of the state. This register of the council from August 1592 to May 1599, in the reign of king James VI, was edited by David Masson and published under the direction of the Deputy Clerk Register of Scotland in 1882. The publication brings together the contents of the principal register (Acta Secreti Concilii) with acts and bands (bonds) of caution (surety) from the registers called Acta Cautionis (pp 561-730); Acts and Ordinances relating to the Borders and the North (731-748); and Miscellaneous Privy Council Papers (749-769). Many of the individuals mentioned are the complainants, those of whom they complained, and the sureties on both sides: at this period, many of the complainants are alleging serious attacks, often of a feuding nature. Many of the bonds entered into by the cautioners are promises to keep the peace towards such enemies. Failure to answer to the council when summoned was a serious contempt, leading to being denounced a rebel, with serious consequences.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Scottish litigants, rebels and cautioners
 (1592-1599)
Quarter Sessions for the North Riding of Yorkshire (1605-1612)
The Quarter Sessions minute books for the North Riding from April 1605 to July 1612 were edited by the Rev. J. C. Atkinson for the North Riding Record Society and published in 1884. This is a calendar of sessional orders, minutes of criminal cases, memoranda and other entries of record concerning the administration of the riding, for the quarter sessions and special sessions held at Thirsk, Stokesley, Richmond, Malton, Helmsley, Northallerton and Topcliffe. Recusants (persons refusing or neglecting to attend parish church services) are listed in the summary of prosecutions on pages 4-5, 10, 17, 21, 42, 55-56, 61, 65, 69, 72, 79, 82, 95, 99, 113-115, 122, 131, 153-155 and 176.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Quarter Sessions for the North Riding of Yorkshire
 (1605-1612)
Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham (1626-1638)
Sexual and religious behaviour, marriage and probate were under the purview of the ecclesiastical courts in England at this period, exercised through the individual dioceses and archdeaconries. The diocese of Durham included the whole of county Durham, Northumberland (except for Hexhamshire) and Alston in Cumberland. The High Commission Court dealt with cases from the whole diocese, and a book of court acts from 1628 to 1639, and another of depositions from 1626 to 1638, survived in the dean and chapter library, were edited by W. Hylton Dyer Longstaffe, and published by the Surtees Society in 1858. This is not a complete abstract of the record: there are hundreds of cases for contempt of the ordinary jurisdiction, of which only a few were selected as examples 'in consequence of the rank of the persons proceeded against or other contents of interest'. However, all cases in which the nature of the offence occurs are traced from start to finish, but omitting much of the proceedings in between. The names and ages of all the deponents are recorded.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Immorality and heresy in Northumberland and Durham
 (1626-1638)
Official Papers (1651)
The State Papers Domestic cover all manner of business relating to Britain, Ireland and the colonies, conducted by the Council of State, as well as other miscellaneous records. These records are from January to October 1651.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Official Papers
 (1651)
Hertfordshire Sessions (1619-1657)
Incidents from the Hertfordshire Sessions Books and Sessions Minute Books. These cover a wide range of criminal and civil business for the county.

FERRY. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

Sample scan, click to enlarge
Hertfordshire Sessions
 (1619-1657)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18Next page
Want to be alerted about new results for this search?
RSSSubscribe to this web feed

Research your ancestry, family history, genealogy and one-name study by direct access to original records and archives indexed by surname.