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Fawcett Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'fawcett'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 907 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Inhabitants of Suffolk (1524)
The lay subsidy granted by Act of Parliament in 1523 was a tax on the laymen (as opposed to clergy), levied on householders, landowners, those possessing moveable goods worth 1 or more, and all workmen aged 16 or over earning 1 or more per annum. Real estate was taxed at a shilling in the pound; moveable goods worth 1 to 2 at fourpence a pound; 2 to 20 at sixpence a pound; and over 20 at a shilling in the pound. Wages were taxed at fourpence in the pound. Aliens were charged double; aliens not chargeable in the above categories had to pay a poll tax of eightpence. The records of the assessment for the county of Suffolk, mostly made in 1524, survive in 64 rolls in the National Archives. From 42 of these a compilation for the whole shire was printed in 1910 as Suffolk Green Book x. This includes a list of defaulters of 1526 and a subsidy roll of 1534 for Bury St Edmunds.

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Inhabitants of Suffolk
 (1524)
Taxpayers in Sussex (1524-1525)
By Act of Parliament of 1523 (14 & 15 Hen. III, c. 16) a general subsidy was raised, spread over four years, from laymen, clergy and peers. In each of the first two years 1s in the was raised from annual income from land; 1s in the on capital goods worth over 2 and under 20; and a flat payment of 4d on goods worth from 1 to 2, and also by persons aged 16 and upwards in receipt of 1 per annum in wages. In the third year a further shilling in the pound was payable on land worth 50 and upwards a year; and in the fourth year a shilling in the pound on goods worth 50 and upwards. To raise this revenue, returns were required from every hundred, parish or township. In Sussex, the returns for 1524 and 1525 cover the city of Chichester (divided into Estrata, Westrata, Southstrata, North[strata] and Palenta), the borough of Midhurst, and then the rest of the county divided into rapes, within those into hundreds, and within those into boroughs, tithings, liberties, townships or parishes. It is important to note that the cinque ports of Hastings, Rye and Winchelsea were exempt from the subsidy, except for alien inhabitants; and that the town of Westbourne was also exempted 'as the town was lately destroyed by fire'. Aliens are noted as such, sometimes with nationality; and Brighthelmstone (Brighton), which had been burnt by the French in 1514, is only represented fragmentarily. The Sussex Record Society published this transcript and edition by Julian Cornwall of the 1524 and 1525 returns: the 1524 return was used for the main transcript where possible, names peculiar to the 1524 lists being marked with an asterisk, and those with amendments in 1524 with a dagger. At the foot of each 1524 return the new names from 1525 are given. Only the amount of the assessment is printed (m. = marks). Letters prefixed to the sum give the basis of the assessment, no letter (or G) meaning that it was on goods - A, annual wages; D, annual wages of day-labourers; F, fees or salaries of office; L, lands; P, profits; W, wages; x, no basis stated.

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Taxpayers in Sussex
 (1524-1525)
Murderers sheltering in Beverley Minster: and their victims (1478-1539)
Criminals could evade pursuit by claiming sanctuary in the church of St John in Beverley, in the East Riding of Yorkshire. This liberty of the minster extended a league in every direction from the church door, and was divided into six sections, each giving greater sanctity to the rights of sanctuary, the sixth and innermost section being the presbitery or chancel. Near the altar there was a stone chair called the Frith Stool, seated on which an accused could claim total immunity. The bailiff would receive the oath of the fugitive, and a clerk recorded 'what man he killed, and wher with, and both ther namez'; the bailiff receiving a fee of 2s 4d, the clerk 4d. Sanctuary was afforded for 30 days, with food and lodging, after which the fugitive was protected to the borders of the county. But within 40 days he had to appear before the coroner, clothed in sackcloth, and be branded on his right hand with the sign of the letter A. This signified that he was swearing to abjure the realm: he was then free to leave the country unhindered. At Beverley the clerks kept a separate register of fugitives' petitions, which survives from 1478 to 1539 in Harleian Manuscript 560. It was edited and printed by the Surtees Society in 1837 under the title Sanctuarium Beverlacense. Some of the criminals came from a considerable distance: the great majority were murderers or homicides. Each entry usually gives full name, original address, (often) trade, a brief description of the crime, often with date, and usually the name of the victim. This index covers all the surnames given.

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Murderers sheltering in Beverley Minster: and their victims
 (1478-1539)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1550-1552)
The Privy Council of Edward VI was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1550-1552)
Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies (1554-1556)
The Privy Council of queen Mary was responsible for internal security in England and Wales, and dealt with all manner of special and urgent matters.

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Liegemen and Traitors, Pirates and Spies
 (1554-1556)
Tradesmen of York (1272-1558)
No man or woman could trade in the city of York without having obtained 'freedom' of the city.Their names were recorded on the 'Freemen's Roll', or Register of the Freemen of the City of York, which contains about 19,900 names for this period. A list of names was prepared for each year, the year being here reckoned as starting at Michaelmas (29 September) until 1373, and thence at Candlemas (2 February). Each annual list starts with the name of the mayor and the camerarii or chamberlains. The chamberlains were freemen charged with the duty of receiving the fees of the new freemen; of seeing that only freemen traded in the city; and of preparing this roll, which was compiled from the names on their own account books from the receipts for the fees. There are three groups of freemen: those who obtained freedom after serving out an apprenticeship to a freeman; the children of freemen; and those who claimed freedom by 'redemption', i. e. by purchase or gift from the Mayor and Court of Aldermen.

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Tradesmen of York
 (1272-1558)
Boys entering Sedbergh School (1550-1560)
B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.

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Boys entering Sedbergh School
 (1550-1560)
Militia in Kingsbury hundred, Somerset (1569)
A muster of the ablemen, gunners, light horsemen, pikemen, archers and billmen available from this hundred, compiled by sir Hugh Paulet, sir Maurice Barkeley, sir Ralph Hopton and John Horner in answer to a royal commission of the 11th year of queen Elizabeth. The returns are arranged by tithing. The hundred consisted of the parishes of Ash Priors, Bishops Lydeard, (the borough of) Chard, Combe St Nicholas, Fitzhead, Huish Episcopi, Kingsbury Episcopi, (the borough of) Wellington, West Buckland, (the market town of) Wiveliscombe, and Winsham. (The sample shown is from the return for the borough of Axbridge)

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Militia in Kingsbury hundred, Somerset
 (1569)
Boys entering Sedbergh School (1560-1570)
B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.

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Boys entering Sedbergh School
 (1560-1570)
Boys entering Sedbergh School (1570-1580)
B. Wilson prepared this edition of the register of the Grammar School at Sedbergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire, published in 1895. Sedbergh school had three exhibitions at St John's College, Cambridge, and for the earliest years little more could be found about the pupils at the school than was recorded at St John's or other colleges. In 1700-1706 the first material from Sedbergh appears, but no more than lists of surnames. From 1746 onwards full names, or surnames and initials, are found for those boys who did not continue to university. It is only from 1820 onwards that the school register starts to give detail: month of entry, age, birthplace, and month of leaving. From then onwards Wilson was able to add more and more biographical detail, except, of course, for those boys in 1895 still at the school or with their careers yet ahead of them.

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Boys entering Sedbergh School
 (1570-1580)
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