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Faukes Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'faukes'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 35 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral (1240-1249)
The Liber A or Pilosus of St Paul's cathedral, London, was initiated in 1241 as an attempt at copying all the charters, chirographs and other diverse writings found in the treasury of the church; after that original project was abandoned, the codex came to be used as a general register or cartulary. The first portion was edited for the Royal Historical Society by Marion Gibbs and printed in 1939. Where the original charters also survived, or a better text was found in Liber L, she used these superior sources. Liber A never became a complete register of the cathedral's charters; nor are the charters it contains necessarily the most important, nor were they grouped chronologically or geographically. The text remains as a record of part of the great landed wealth of the church in London and nearby. The persons that appear are the grantors, justices, those named in the descriptions of property, and the witnesses.

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Early Charters of St Paul's Cathedral
 (1240-1249)
Fine Rolls (1246-1272)
The fine rolls of the 31st to 57th years of the reign of king Henry III record part of the government administration in England. These excerpts from the rolls list in transcript applications by plaintiffs for various writs (such as 'ad terminum' and 'pone') and for assizes to be held by the justices in eyre to look into their grievances. A fine of half a mark (6s 8d) or a mark (13s 4d) was usually levied; the cases are normally identified by county, and record that the appropriate sheriff had been notified. There are also more extensive records, in which more detail is given. The excerpts were made by the Record Commission and printed in 1836.

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Fine Rolls
 (1246-1272)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1241-1283)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Both sets of inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association, and printed in 1891. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1241-1283)
Yorkshire Inquisitions (1294-1303)
Inquisitions post mortem are inquiries as to the real estate and heir of each person holding in capite or in chief, i. e. directly, from the Crown, or whose estates had been escheated or were in ward. The age and relationship of the heir are usually recorded. Inquisitions ad quod damnum enquired as to any activities (including maladministration by local officials) that had resulted in any material loss to the Crown. Proofs of age are inquiries into the precise date of birth of an heir, usually involving local inhabitants recalling those circumstances which fixed that date in their mind. Yorkshire inquisitions for this period were edited by William Brown for the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, and printed in 1902. This index covers all names mentioned, including jurors, tenants, &c. The volume also includes two stray inquests, from 1245 and 1282.

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Yorkshire Inquisitions 
 (1294-1303)
Inhabitants of London (1275-1312)
Letter Book B of the City of London contains enrolments of recognizances between inhabitants, particularly citizens, for sums of money lent or due; grants of pieces of land or property; and various records relating to the city administration.

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Inhabitants of London
 (1275-1312)
Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons (1317-1321)
The Patent Rolls are the Chancery enrolments of royal letters patent. Those for the 11th to the 14th years of the reign of king Edward II (8 July 1317 to 7 July 1321) were edited for the Public Record Office by G. F. Handcock, and published in 1903. The main contents are royal commissions and grants; ratifications of ecclesiastical estates; writs of aid to royal servants and purveyors; and pardons. Most extensive are the commissions of oyer and terminer to justices to investigate complaints about specific crimes and wrongs in particular counties.

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Grantees of offices, commissions and pardons
 (1317-1321)
Chancery Warrants (1244-1326)
Warrants were issued by the kings of England to the royal chancery: most of these warrants led to further proceedings which are recorded on the Charter Rolls, Patent Rolls, Fine Rolls, Close Rolls or the Inquisitions: but archivists have identified a large number of warrants for which there are no such equivalent records, and those for the reigns of Edward I and Edward II are gathered here. Most of the entries relate to England and Wales, but with occasional items referring to Ireland and the English possessions in France.

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Chancery Warrants
 (1244-1326)
Staffordshire entries on the Assize, De Banco and Fine Rolls (1307-1327)
Extracts of Staffordshire entries from these three series of records for the reign of king Edward II were made by Major-General the Hon. G. Wrottesley, and published by the William Salt Society in 1888. The justices in eyre (itinerant) holding assizes not only tried all civil actions outstanding on their advent, pleas of the crown and common pleas, but also interrogated the juries of each hundred and borough as to the Articles of the Eyre, inquiring into the king's proprietary rights, escheats, wardships, and questions of maladministration. The court of King's Bench (de Banco) sat in Westminster, similarly dealing with court cases brought in from throughout the country. The fine rolls record part of the government administration in England, with orders sent out day by day to individual officers, and commitment of particular responsibilities and duties. Wrottesley's extracts are far from exhaustive, as he confined his attention to those landed gentry families that he considered of importance.

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Staffordshire entries on the Assize, De Banco and Fine Rolls
 (1307-1327)
Worcestershire Inhabitants (1327)
The Worcestershire Lay Subsidy roll of the 1st year of king Edward III lists lay inhabitants of each township of the shire and of the five boroughs of Droitwich (Wych), Dudley, Evesham, Kidderminster and Worcester, with the amount of tax payable by each. The roll was edited for the Worcestershire Historical Society by the Reverend F. J. Eld, and published in 1895.

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Worcestershire Inhabitants
 (1327)
Testators and legatees in London (1258-1358)
The mediaeval Court of Husting of the city of London sat (usually on a Monday) each week: among its functions was the enrolment of deeds and wills relating to citizens of London. In their strictest technical sense the terms 'will' and 'devise' are appropriate to real estate, and the terms 'testament', 'bequest' and 'legacy' to personal estate, but this distinction is lost sight of in ordinary usage. This calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting was edited by Reginald R. Sharpe, records clerk in the office of the Town Clerk of the City of London, and printed by order of the corporation in 1889. The date of the court is given in italics, with the year in bold in the margin. The testator's name is given in capitals (surname first, in bold), and then a brief listing of substantial bequests, with the names of legatees, and then the date of making of the will, and reference. Sometimes there were further proceedings in the court relating to the will, such as 'It was found by a jury that the testator was of full age when he made the above testament', a statement as to where the testament had been proved, or proceedings on a challenge to the testament &c. - such additional material is added in a smaller typeface in this edition.

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Testators and legatees in London
 (1258-1358)
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