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Farrett Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'farrett'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Colonists and adventurers (1610-1660)
During this period, the English crown issued charters to companies of adventurers and individual proprietors to establish settlements in Acadia (Nova Scotia), Africa, Amazon, Anguilla, Antigua, Association (Tortuga), Bahamas, Barbadoes, Barbuda, Bermudas (Somers Islands), Canada, Cape Gratia de Dios, Carolina, Bay of Darien, Delaware Bay, Deseada, Dominica, Eleuthera, Enegada, Fernando de Noronho, Floria, Fonseca, Grenada, Guadaloupe, Guiana, Guinea, Henrietta, Jamaica, Long Island, Maine, Marigalante, Maryland, Metalina, Montserrat, Narrangansetts Bay, Nevis, New England (New Plymouth, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Haven), Newfoundland, New Hampshire, New York, Nova Scotia, Providence Island, Quebec, Redendo, Rhode Island, St Bartholomew, St Brandon, St Christopher's, St Eustache, St Lucia, St Martin, St Vincent, Sembrera, Surinam, Tadousac, Tobago, Todosantes, Trinidad and Virginia. The central archive relating to these ventures up to 1688 amounted to 71 volumes of correspondence, plus 109 entry books containing entries of letters sent to the colonies, of charters, commissions and instructions, minutes and proceedings of the companies and proprietaries that in the first instance governed several of the colonies, journals of the Board of Trade, &c. This archive, called the State Papers, Colonial Series, at the Public Record Office, was calendared for the period through to 1660 by W. Noel Sainsbury, and published in 1860. The first few pages include material as early as 1574, but the bulk of the volume is from 1610 to 1660, and that is indexed here.

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Colonists and adventurers
 (1610-1660)
Wandsworth Burials (1666)
The ancient parish of Wandsworth in Surrey comprised the single township of Wandsworth, including the hamlets of Garratt, Half Farthing and Summers Town. It lay in the archdeaconry of Surrey of the diocese of Winchester: unfortunately, few bishop's transcripts of Surrey parish registers survive earlier than 1800. Although the original parish registers of Wandsworth doubtless commenced in 1538, the volume(s) before 1603 had been lost by the 19th century. In 1889 a careful transcript by John Traviss Squire of the first three surviving registers was printed, and we have now indexed it year by year. The early burial registers contain little detail - date of burial, and full name. For the burial of children, the father's name is also stated; for the burial of wives, the husband's. Such details as date or cause of death, age, address or occupation are almost never given. The burial registers are considerably more bulky than the baptism registers, because the burying ground was used by Dissenters, who formed a large part of the population. P. indicates death by plague.

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Wandsworth Burials
 (1666)
National ArchivesMasters and Apprentices (1740)
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's father's name and address, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. 6 October to 3 December 1740

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Masters and Apprentices
 (1740)
National ArchivesBritish merchant seamen (1835-1836)
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen's Registration Bill. Under this act this large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships' crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. Each seaman was assigned a number, and the names were arranged in the register by first two letters of the surname (our sample scan shows one of the pages for 'Sm'); in addition, an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. But no effective method was devised to prevent the same man being registered twice as he appeared in a second crew list; moreover, the original crew lists were clearly difficult for the registry clerks to copy, and some of the surname spellings appear to be corrupted. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and this register was abandoned after less than two years: but it is an apparently comprehensive source for British merchant seamen in 1835 to 1836. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (master, captain, mate, 2nd mate, mariner, seaman, fisherman, cook, carpenter, boy &c.); and the name and home port of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all (for instance, Charleston and Stockholm appear in the sample scan). The final column 'How disposed of' is rarely used, and indicates those instances where a man died, was discharged, or deserted his ship during the voyage.

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British merchant seamen
 (1835-1836)
National ArchivesSailors and marines on H. M. S. Trafalgar in the Crimean War (1854-1856)
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. By Admiralty Order the Crimea Medal was awarded to sailors and marines present during the campaign, between 17 September 1854 (the first landing at Eupatoria) and 9 September 1855 (when the allies secured Sebastopol). The sailors' medals were mostly delivered to them on board ship in the course of 1856; the marines' medals were sent to their respective headquarters for distribution. The remarks as to distribution in this medal roll therefore give more specific information as to the whereabouts of the sailor recipients in 1856 than about the marines. Her Majesty's Ship Trafalgar, a 120-gun sailing ship, took part in the assault. Four clasps to this medal were awarded to the men present in the actions at Sebastopol itself, Inkerman, Balaklave (Balaclava) and (the sea of) Azoff, but the recipients of these clasps are recorded on separate rolls, not part of this index, but indexed on this site.

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Sailors and marines on H. M. S. Trafalgar in the Crimean War
 (1854-1856)
National ArchivesSailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal (1854-1857)
During the Crimean War, a British and French fleet entered the Baltic, and captured Bomarsund harbour and one of the Aland Islands (now part of Finland). Bomarsund is the sound between the islands and the Swedish island of Vardo; and at the fine harbour on Bomarsund, dominating the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia, and indirectly that of the Gulf of Finland, the Russians had constructed a northern naval base, and this was destroyed in the attack. The British fleet taking part in the Baltic expedition comprised Her Majesty's ships Aeolus, Ajax, Alban, Algiers, Amphion, Archer, Arrogant, Basilisk, Belleisle, Blenheim, Boscawen, Bulldog, Caesar, Calcutta, Centaur, Colossus, Conflict, Cornwallis, Cossack, Cressy, Cruizer, Cuckoo, Cumberland, Dauntless, Desperate, Dragon, Driver, Duke of Wellington, Edinburgh, Esk, Euryalus, Exmouth, Falcon, Firefly, Geyser, Gladiator, Gorgon, Hannibal, Harrier, Hastings, Hawke, Hecla, Hogue, Imperieuse, James Watt, Leopard, Lightning, Locust, Magicienne, Majestic, Merlin, Miranda, Monarch, Neptune, Nile, Odin, Orion, Otter, Pembroke, Penelope, Pigmy, Porcupine, Prince Regent, Princess Royal, Pylades, Resistance, Retribution, Rhadamanthus, Rosamond, Royal George, Royal William, Russell, St George, St Jean D'Acre, St Vincent, Sphinx, Stromboli, Tartar, Termagant, Tribune, Tyne, Valorous, Volage, Volcano, Vulture, Wrangler and Zephyr. This is the medal roll of the naval and marine claimants who qualified for the Baltic Medal for service in 1854 to 1855. The medals were dispatched in batches from early 1857, the first batch being numbered B A 1, the next B A 2, &c.; then follows the destination (a place or, more usually, a ship) and the date of dispatch. Most of the medals had been sent by the end of 1857.

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Sailors and marines awarded the Baltic Medal 
 (1854-1857)
East Kent Registered Electors: Ramsgate (1865)
The poll for two knights of the shire to represent the Eastern Division of the county of Kent in parliament was taken 18 July 1865, the candidates being Sir Edward Cholmeley Dering, bart., (D), Sir Brook William Bridges, bart., (B), and Sir Norton Joseph Knatchbull, bart., (K). This poll book lists all registered electors, whether they voted or not, by electoral district (Ashford, Canterbury, Dover, Faversham, Hythe, Margate, Ramsgate, Romney, Sandwich, Sheerness, Sittingbourne, Whitstable and Wingham) and then by township or parish within which lay the property whereby the electors had qualified. The lefthand column gives sequential number in the whole volume; then follows the elector's full name, surname first, and his address (often elsewhere); and on the righthand side for whom he voted. When the elector was qualified in duplicate the vote is recorded opposite to the number upon which he claimed to vote at the polling booth, and wherever his name occurs elsewhere a reference is made, immediately after the address, to the number where his vote is recorded, with the initials of the candidates for whom he voted. Duplicate voters who were dead at the time of the election, or did not vote, are printed in italics to signify that they did not vote, or are stated to be dead once only; and wherever the names of such electors occur elsewhere references are made to the numbers where alone they are reckoned in the abstract of the poll as dead or not voting. Whenever a number only, without any other reference, follows the address, it denotes that at the number referred to, the elector is entered as not voting.

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East Kent Registered Electors: Ramsgate
 (1865)
National ArchivesMen of the 43rd Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War (1866-1870)
New Zealand War Medal roll for the 43rd (Monmouthshire Light Infantry) Regiment of Foot: for service in the New Zealand campaign 1866 to 1867: the rolls were compiled following a general order in 1869 and the medals were distributed in 1870. The regiment had been serving in India, and was moved to New Zealand in 1866; the men returned to England in 1868.

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Men of the 43rd Regiment who fought in the New Zealand War
 (1866-1870)
Criminals reconvicted in London (1923)
The Police Gazette was published by Authority by the London Metropolitan Police, and circulated, as confidential, to the police forces throughout Britain and Ireland. The contents were based on the information routinely submitted to the Criminal Record Office. One of the regular features was a section entitled Re-Convictions, in which were given details of people sentenced at the various criminal courts round the country (with occasional notices of discharge &c.). First of all, the full name of the suspect is given (in bold), the C. R. O. number; the court; date; penalty or length of imprisonment; nature of crime. There is then usually a cross-reference to the details of the case as previously advertised in the Police Gazette, with number of case and date of issue. Variations of surname spelling and aliases are noted in the descriptions, and these variants and aliases have also been indexed.

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Criminals reconvicted in London 
 (1923)
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