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Falmouth Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'falmouth'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 9 records (displaying 1 to 9): 

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Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland (1660-1675)
This correspondence deals with a large variety of personal and public affairs in Ireland and England.

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Letters and papers of James first duke of Ormond, Lord Deputy of Ireland
 (1660-1675)
Boys at Eton (1441-1698)
King Henry VI founded a college at Eton in Buckinghamshire in 1440, 'to the praise, glory and honour of the Crucified, the exaltation of the most glorious Virgin His mother, and the establishing of holy Church His bride'. From this foundation has evolved the modern public school. Sir Wasey Sterry compiled a register for the college from 1441 to 1698, from a variety of surviving records, and including groundwork from his 'A List of Eton Commensals' of 1904, and R. A. Austen-Leigh's 'A List of Eton Collegers' of 1905. This resulting 'Eton College Register' was published in 1943. Because of the variety of underlying materials, the entries vary greatly in depth: some names survive only as a surname of not too certain date. In the fullest entries, the surname (often with a variant spelling) is given first, in bold, followed by the years of entry and leaving. The christian name is given next; then birthplace, and name of father. The initials K. S. (King's Scholar) indicate a scholar on the foundation. There will then follow a summary of the man's career, death, burial and probate; and the sources for the information, in italics, at the end of the entry.

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Boys at Eton 
 (1441-1698)
Licences for marriages in southern England (1632-1714)
The province or archbishopric of Canterbury covered all England and Wales except for the northern counties in the four dioceses of the archbishopric of York (York, Durham, Chester and Carlisle). Marriage licences were generally issued by the local dioceses, but above them was the jurisdiction of the archbishop. Where the prospective bride and groom were from different dioceses it would be expected that they obtain a licence from the archbishop; in practice, the archbishop residing at Lambeth, and the actual offices of the province being in London, which was itself split into myriad ecclesiastical jurisdictions, and spilled into adjoining dioceses, this facility was particularly resorted to by couples from London and the home counties, although there are quite a few entries referring to parties from further afield. Three calendars of licences issued by the Faculty Office of the archbishop were edited by George A Cokayne (Clarenceux King of Arms) and Edward Alexander Fry and printed as part of the Index Library by the British Record Society Ltd in 1905. The first calendar is from 14 October 1632 to 31 October 1695 (pp. 1 to 132); the second calendar (awkwardly called Calendar No. 1) runs from November 1695 to December 1706 (132-225); the third (Calendar No. 2) from January 1707 to December 1721, but was transcribed only to the death of queen Anne, 1 August 1714. The calendars give only the dates and the full names of both parties. Where the corresponding marriage allegations had been printed in abstract by colonel Joseph Lemuel Chester in volume xxiv of the Harleian Society (1886), an asterisk is put by the entry in this publication. The licences indicated an intention to marry, but not all licences resulted in a wedding.

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Licences for marriages in southern England
 (1632-1714)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1789)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments, and bankrupts, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1789)
Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions (1793)
Death notices and obituaries, marriage and birth notices, civil and military promotions, clerical preferments and domestic occurrences, as reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. Mostly from England and Wales, but items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad.

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Deaths, Marriages, News and Promotions
 (1793)
Marriages (1810)
English marriages, as reported in the European Magazine. Includes some items from Ireland, Scotland and abroad. July to December 1810.

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Marriages
 (1810)
Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law (1880)
The Unclaimed Money Registry and Next-of-Kin Advertisement Office of F. H. Dougal & Co., on the Strand in London, published a comprehensive 'Index to Advertisements for Next of Kin, Heirs at Law, Legatees, &c., &c., who have been Advertised for to Claim Money and Property in Great Britain and all Parts of the World; also Annuitants, Shareholders, Intestates, Testators, Missing Friends, Creditors or their Representatives, Claimants, Unclaimed and Reclaimed Dividends and Stock, Citations, Administrations, Rewards for Certificates, Wills, Advertisements, &c., Claims, Unclaimed Balances, Packages, Addresses, Parish Clerks' Notices, Foreign Intestates, &c., &c.' The original list was compiled about 1860, but from materials dating back even into the 18th century: most of the references belong to 1850 to 1880. For each entry only a name is given, sometimes with a placename added in brackets: there may be a reference number, but there is no key by which the original advertisement may be traced. The enquirer of the time had to remit 1 for a 'Full and Authentic Copy of the Original Advertisement, together with name and date of newspaper in which the same appeared'.

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Missing Next-of-Kin and Heirs-at-Law 
 (1880)
Companion Electrical Engineers (Companion I. E. E.) (1939)
The Institution of Electrical Engineers was founded in 1871 under the name of The Society of Telegraph Engineers, and incorporated by royal charter in 1921. The list of members, corrected to 1 September 1939, gives the names and addresses of the various grades of members. Members (M. I. E. E.) and Associate Members (A. M. I. E. E.) were entitled to describe themselves as Chartered Electrical Engineers. Then there are the Associates (Associate I. E. E.), Companions (Companion I. E. E.), Graduates (Graduate I. E. E.) and Students (Student I. E. E.). The names are given in bold, surname first; before each name is the year of attaining that grade; and for the higher grades the year of each lower grade is also given, e. g. (G. 1931).

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Companion Electrical Engineers (Companion I. E. E.)
 (1939)
Members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (M. I. Mech. E.) (1947)
The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, founded in 1847, was incorporated by royal charter in 1930. The list of members of 1 March 1947 gives the names (surname first) and addresses of the seven classes of member - Honorary Members (Hon. M. I. Mech. E.); Members (M. I. Mech. E.); Associate Members (A. M. I. Mech. E.); Companions (C. I. Mech. E.); Associates (A. I. Mech. E.); Graduates (G. I. Mech. E.); and Students (S. I. Mech. E.). The year of attaining qualification is given in the left-hand margin; in the higher grades the years of achieving the lower grades are also given, bracketed together. The crossed swords symbol indicates naval or military service during the Great War of 1914-1918; an italic b shows a member of the Benevolent Fund. (p) after a Graduate's or a Student's name indicates one who had passed the whole of the A. M. Examination or its recognized equivalent.

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Members of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (M. I. Mech. E.)
 (1947)
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