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English Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'english'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 906 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Curia Regis Rolls (1196-1201)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

ENGLISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1196-1201)
Curia Regis Rolls (1210-1212)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period.

ENGLISH. Cost: £4.00. Add to basket

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1210-1212)
Curia Regis Rolls (1219-1220)
The Curia Regis, king's court, of mediaeval England took cases from throughout the country, and its records are among the most important surviving from this early period. Rolls 71 and 71B for Michaelmas term of the 3rd and 4th years, and 72 and 73 for Hilary term and Easter term of the 4th year of the reign of king Henry III (Michaelmas 1219 to Easter 1220) were edited by C. T. Flower of the Public Record Office and published in 1938. Each entry is copied in full, the Latin extended from the abbreviated original, the personal and place names given as in the original; where these vary between duplicate rolls, variant spellings are given in the footnotes. The county of each case was marked in the margin in the originals, and this is shown in italics at the start of each entry in the printed edition.

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Curia Regis Rolls 
 (1219-1220)
Somerset Assizes (1272-1279)
The records of the assizes held by the royal justices in eyre (itinerant) in Somerset during this period were edited by Lionel Landon and published by the Somerset Record Society in 1926. The justices not only tried all civil actions outstanding on their advent, pleas of the crown and common pleas, but also interrogated the juries of each hundred and borough as to the Articles of the Eyre, inquiring into the king's proprietary rights, escheats, wardships, and questions of maladministration. Appendix I adds some scattered Somerset items from rolls for 1204, 1218 and 1240.

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Somerset Assizes
 (1272-1279)
Inhabitants of Norwich (1307-1341)
This calendar of the deeds enrolled from 1307 to 1341 was compiled for the corporation by Edith Crosse (MacKinnon), indexed by Walter Rye, and published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1915. They are set out chronologically, translated from the original Latin into English, giving the name and occupation of grantor and grantee, and naming the parish in which the property lay. Precise dates are not given, just the regnal year.

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Inhabitants of Norwich
 (1307-1341)
Clergy at Beverley Minster (1322-1347)
The minster (collegiate church) of St John of Beverley in Yorkshire was an important foundation with extensive ecclesiastical and temporal rights exercised by the chapter. The main register of the administration in both respects was the chapter act book, and this edition of the act book from 2 February 1322 to 19 November 1347 was edited by Arthur Francis Leach for the Surtees Society and published in 1903. The act book material occupies pages 1 to 136; to this were added extracts relating to Beverley from the registers of the Archbishops of York from 1279 to 1381; miscellaneous documents from York Minster manuscripts and the British Museum from 1135 to 1314; and a copy of the Beverley Provost's Book, compiled in 1417, but with material from the preceding centuries. All these sources are covered by this index: but the bulk of the personal references are from the chapter act book, and relate to clergy at or connected with Beverley.

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Clergy at Beverley Minster
 (1322-1347)
Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales (1400-1409)
The county of Cheshire had palatine status, being in some measure independent of the rest of England: moreover, from the Statute of Wales of 1284, after king Edward I's subjugation of North Wales, until the union of England and Wales in 1536 to 1543, much of the administration of North Wales (county Flint in particular) was directed from Chester. When the Chester Recognizance Rolls were moved from Chester to the Public Record Office, they were placed among the Welsh Records. These rolls, so called because they do include recognizances (of debts &c.) among their contents, are in fact the Chancery Rolls of the palatinate, containing enrolments of charters, letters patent, commissions and other documents issued under the seal of the palatinate. Deeds and other evidences of a private nature were also enrolled on them. A calendar of the Recognizance Rolls from their commencement to the end of the reign of Henry IV was prepared by Peter Turner and included in the 36th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records in 1875. We have now indexed this, dividing the enrolments into decades. This is the period from the 1st to the 11th years of king Henry IV.

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Inhabitants of Cheshire and North Wales
 (1400-1409)
Taxpayers in Sussex (1524-1525)
By Act of Parliament of 1523 (14 & 15 Hen. III, c. 16) a general subsidy was raised, spread over four years, from laymen, clergy and peers. In each of the first two years 1s in the was raised from annual income from land; 1s in the on capital goods worth over 2 and under 20; and a flat payment of 4d on goods worth from 1 to 2, and also by persons aged 16 and upwards in receipt of 1 per annum in wages. In the third year a further shilling in the pound was payable on land worth 50 and upwards a year; and in the fourth year a shilling in the pound on goods worth 50 and upwards. To raise this revenue, returns were required from every hundred, parish or township. In Sussex, the returns for 1524 and 1525 cover the city of Chichester (divided into Estrata, Westrata, Southstrata, North[strata] and Palenta), the borough of Midhurst, and then the rest of the county divided into rapes, within those into hundreds, and within those into boroughs, tithings, liberties, townships or parishes. It is important to note that the cinque ports of Hastings, Rye and Winchelsea were exempt from the subsidy, except for alien inhabitants; and that the town of Westbourne was also exempted 'as the town was lately destroyed by fire'. Aliens are noted as such, sometimes with nationality; and Brighthelmstone (Brighton), which had been burnt by the French in 1514, is only represented fragmentarily. The Sussex Record Society published this transcript and edition by Julian Cornwall of the 1524 and 1525 returns: the 1524 return was used for the main transcript where possible, names peculiar to the 1524 lists being marked with an asterisk, and those with amendments in 1524 with a dagger. At the foot of each 1524 return the new names from 1525 are given. Only the amount of the assessment is printed (m. = marks). Letters prefixed to the sum give the basis of the assessment, no letter (or G) meaning that it was on goods - A, annual wages; D, annual wages of day-labourers; F, fees or salaries of office; L, lands; P, profits; W, wages; x, no basis stated.

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Taxpayers in Sussex
 (1524-1525)
Inhabitants of Nottingham (1485-1547)
The muniments of the borough of Nottingham include extensive mediaeval archives. A selection from these from the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII was prepared and edited by W. H. Stevenson for the Corporation, and printed, with translations of the passages in Latin, in 1885. The principal sources used are the borough Court Books, largely dealing with civil cases, for which an almost complete series survives for this period; Sessions Rolls (92 survive for the two reigns), in which crimes and misdemeanours are recorded; a Mickletorn or Leet jury roll; detailed chamberlains' and bridge-wardens' accounts; and the Hall Books, or council minutes. There are lists of burgesses enrolled; bakers admitted to bake; and fines for licences to trade. A subsidy roll of 1523-4 lists householders by street, and there is an appendix of local deeds, including some material dating back to the 14th century.

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Inhabitants of Nottingham
 (1485-1547)
Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

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Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
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