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Empson Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'empson'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 269 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Yorkshire Testators and Legatees (1484-1508)
Wills and testaments from the diocese of York (Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Hexhamshire, Lancashire north of the Ribble, and southwest Westmorland) registered at York. Richmond and Southwell archdeaconries had their own lower probate jurisdictions, so the wills registered at York are predominantly from the East and West Ridings and the eastern part of the North Riding of Yorkshire. In theory, wills dealt with real property and testaments with personal property, but the distinction hardly applies in practice: most of these wills are in Latin, but some are in English. Being before the Reformation, they commonly start with benefactions to churches, chantries, chapels, &c., and with provisions for the burning of candles ('lights') and saying of masses. This publication in 1869 by the Surtees Society as Testamenta Eboracensia iv is an edition by James Raine of selected wills from the period. Some additional material is included from the Prerogative Court of Canterbury and the York Dean and Chapter archives.

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Yorkshire Testators and Legatees
 (1484-1508)
Patent Roll 1 Henry VIII (1509-1510)
Royal grants of all kinds were enrolled on the Patent Rolls of England. Many of these grants originated as signed bills (S. B.) or privy seals (P. S.). J. S. Brewer calendared the rolls for the first year of the reign of king Henry VIII (22 April 1509-21 April 1510) for the Master of the Rolls, including all the surviving signed bills and privy seals (some of which had never led to enrolment), in this volume published in 1862. We have reindexed this: most of the names that occur are of those granted royal offices, or wardships or ecclesiastical preferments that were in the hands of the Crown, and often the names of those whom they superseded.

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Patent Roll 1 Henry VIII 
 (1509-1510)
Recipients of grants of land by the Crown; and other grantors and grantees (1427-1516)
Grants of land by the Crown were enrolled on the Charter Rolls: but this series of records was also used by other magnates and religious houses as a way of having their own deeds inspected, confirmed and registered. It will be seen from this that some of the material described in these inspeximuses dates back to a considerably earlier period. In addition, there is an appendix of fragments of charter roll material from 1215 and 1286 to 1288. The royal grants enrolled relate not only to land, but also to various privileges that were part of the royal prerogative. Most of the material is from England, the remainder relating to Ireland, Wales and possessions in France, but virtually nothing from Scotland, which was an independent kingdom at this period.

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Recipients of grants of land by the Crown; and other grantors and grantees
 (1427-1516)
Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims (1464-1524)
Criminals could evade pursuit by claiming sanctuary in Durham Cathedral. Persons who took refuge fled to the north door of the cathedral, and knocked for admission. There were two chambers over the door in which men slept, for the purpose of admitting fugitives at any hour of the night. As soon as anyone was so admitted, the Galilee bell was immediately tolled, to give notice that someone had taken sanctuary. The offender was required to declare before witnesses the nature of his offence, and to toll a bell in token of his demanding the privilege of sanctuary. He was then provided with a gown of black cloth with a yellow cross, called St Cuthbert's Cross, upon the left shoulder. A grate was provided near the south door to sleep upon, and for 37 days sufficient provisions and bedding were provided. But within 40 days he had to appear before the coroner, clothed in sackcloth, and be branded on his right hand with the sign of the letter A. This signified that he was swearing to abjure the realm: he was then free to leave the country unhindered. The petitions for immunity were entered in the diocesan registers, usually with the marginal note 'Peticio Immunitatis': those from 18 June 1464 to 10 September 1524 (the privilege was finally abolished in 1624) were edited and printed by the Surtees Society in 1837 under the title Sanctuarium Dunelmense. Some of the criminals came from a considerable distance: the great majority were murderers or homicides. Each entry usually gives full name, original address, (often) trade, a brief description of the crime, often with date, and usually the name of the victim, as well as the witnesses to the petition. This index covers all the surnames given.

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Murderers sheltering in Durham Cathedral: and their victims
 (1464-1524)
Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire (1406-1535)
The Hospital of the Holy Cross was founded in 1269; in time this fraternity became a social and religious gild. 'The Register of the Gild of the Holy Cross, the Blessed Mary and St John the Baptist of Stratford-upon-Avon' was edited by J. Harvey Bloom, rector of Whitchurch, and printed in 1907. The register is a record of admissions to the gild, an account of the fines paid by new members, and the names of those in arrear. Each year's record usually starts on the Monday after Ascension Day (the sixth Thursday after Easter), when the new aldermen, master and proctors of the gild were elected, all duly named. Then follow the admissions to the gild, including payments for prayers and candles (lights) for the faithful dead; and the names of the sureties for these payments. Interspersed with this are occasional proclamations and memoranda concerning the fraternity. A peculiarity of this publication is that the years given at the head of each page (e. g. 1502-3) are those of the regnal year (in that case 18 Henry VII) in which the Monday after Ascension Day fell. The regnal years of Henry IV, Henry VI, Richard III and Henry VII all started after that day in the calendars of 1399, 1422, 1483 and 1485; so the gild registers during those years actually cover the following year to that shown in this printed text (in that case, 1503-4).

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Inhabitants of Stratford upon Avon in Warwickshire
 (1406-1535)
London Liverymen: Armourers (1537)
J. Caley, F.R.S., F.S.A. transcribed this 'curious record' found in the Chapter House, Westminster, 'a list of the freemen of the various companies resident in London and Westminster; from Thomas Lewyn being mentioned as sheriff, it appears it was made in the year 1537.' Thirty-seven companies are listed, comprising 2400 individuals: Armourers, Bakers, Barber Surgeons, Blacksmiths, Brewers, Broiderers, Clothworkers, Coopers, Cordwainers, Curriers, Cutlers, Drapers, Fishmongers, Fletchers, Founders, Freemasons, Fruiterers, Goldsmiths, Grocers, Haberdashers, Innholders, Ironmongers, Joiners, Leather Sellers, Merchant Taylors, Painter Stainers, Plasterers, Plumbers, Saddlers, Salters, Skinners, Spurriers, Tallow Chandlers, Tilers, Vintners, Wax Chandlers and Weavers.

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London Liverymen: Armourers
 (1537)
London Liverymen: Cordwainers (1537)
J. Caley, F.R.S., F.S.A. transcribed this 'curious record' found in the Chapter House, Westminster, 'a list of the freemen of the various companies resident in London and Westminster; from Thomas Lewyn being mentioned as sheriff, it appears it was made in the year 1537.' Thirty-seven companies are listed, comprising 2400 individuals: Armourers, Bakers, Barber Surgeons, Blacksmiths, Brewers, Broiderers, Clothworkers, Coopers, Cordwainers, Curriers, Cutlers, Drapers, Fishmongers, Fletchers, Founders, Freemasons, Fruiterers, Goldsmiths, Grocers, Haberdashers, Innholders, Ironmongers, Joiners, Leather Sellers, Merchant Taylors, Painter Stainers, Plasterers, Plumbers, Saddlers, Salters, Skinners, Spurriers, Tallow Chandlers, Tilers, Vintners, Wax Chandlers and Weavers.

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London Liverymen: Cordwainers
 (1537)
Members of the Armourers' Company of the City of London (1537)
In 1889 the Hon. Harold Dillon published this copy of lists of members of the Armourers' and Cutlers' Companies of the city of London transcribed from one of the Chapter House Books in the Public Record Office.

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Members of the Armourers' Company of the City of London
 (1537)
Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries (1546-1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and from 1546 to 1548 the commissioners produced these certificates giving brief details of the establishment and nature of each foundation, with an inventory of valuables and rental of lands. The individuals named in the certificates are thus the founder, the present incumbent, and the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income. All the surviving certificates were edited by William Page for the Surtees Society, and published from 1892.

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Tenants, founders and incumbents of Yorkshire chantries
 (1546-1548)
Norwich Muster Accounts (1578)
In 1846 the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society printed Extracts from Original Manuscripts belonging to the Norwich Corporation: including the account of Richard Duncks, of money received and expended in training 80 caliver men of the city of Norwich, 16 and 17 October 1578.

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Norwich Muster Accounts
 (1578)
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