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Elm Surname Ancestry Results

Our indexes 1000-1999 include entries for the spelling 'elm'. In the period you have requested, we have the following 12 records (displaying 1 to 10): 

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland (1305-1342)
These are abstracts of the entries relating to Great Britain and Ireland from the Regesta of popes Clement V, John XXII and Benedict XII. Many of these entries relate to clerical appointments and disputes, but there are also indults to devout laymen and women for portable altars, remission of sins, &c. This source is particularly valuable for Ireland, for which many of the key government records of this period are lost. Clement V was consecrated and crowned 14 November 1305 (the day from which his pontificate is dated); John XXII was crowned 5 September 1316; Benedict XII 8 January 1335 and died 25 April 1342. From 1309 onwards the papacy was in exile at Avignon. The extracts were made by W. H. Bliss from Regesta lii to cxxxvi, and published in 1895. Bliss remarked that 'although the writing of the Papal Registers of the 14th century is clearer than that of many contemporary English MSS., the entries in them were for the most part founded upon petitions or letters from different countries, and the scribes in the Papal Chancery must have experienced even greater difficulty in copying English proper names than English students experience nowadays in reading the early Chancery Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office. Not having local or personal knowledge, they constantly misread doubtful letters.'

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Clergy, the religious and the faithful in Britain and Ireland
 (1305-1342)
Inhabitants of Cambridge (1298-1389)
'Cambridge Gild Records' was edited by Mary Bateson for the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, and printed in 1903. Several important records for the town are brought together: minutes of the Gild of St Mary in the church of St Mary in the Market Place, 1298-1319 (pages 1-13); bede rolls of the same of around 1349 (14-25); minutes of the Gild of Corpus Christi in the church of St Bene't (26-62); returns for all the Cambridge gilds in 1389 (63-128); a calendar of deeds connected with the gilds of St Mary and Corpus Christi (129-150); and also a subsidy roll for the borough, listing householders in the 8th year of king Edward II (1314-1315) (151-157). The gild minutes include lists of persons entering the gild, usually paying a certain amount for alms and for wax for lights (candles). The bede rolls list prayers for the souls of the deceased, using the formula 'pro anima ..... (et ..... uxoris ejus)', 'for the soul of ..... (and of ..... his wife)'. Dates are not generally given, but most of the entries in these bede rolls are from 1349 to 1352.

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Inhabitants of Cambridge
 (1298-1389)
Norfolk Feet of Fines (1307-1485)
Pedes Finium - law suits, or pretended suits, putting on record the ownership of land in Norfolk. These abstracts were prepared by Walter Rye.

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Norfolk Feet of Fines
 (1307-1485)
Tenants of Somerset chantries (1548)
Chantries were established to perform services for the souls of their founders and other faithful dead, including annual obits and anniversaries at which alms were usually distributed. The chantries could be at an existing altar in a parish church, a new altar in a side chapel of an existing church, in a new chapel in the churchyard or some miles from an existing church: few were founded before 1300, and most date from 1450 to 1500. Hospitals were places provided by similar foundations to receive the poor and weak; there were also religious guilds, brotherhoods and fraternities, and colleges (like large chantries at which three or more secular priests lived in common). An Act of Parliament of 1545 gave king Henry VIII the power to dissolve such chantries, chapels, &c., the proceeds to be devoted to the expenses of the wars in France and Scotland. Commissioners were appointed 14 February 1546 to survey the chantries and seize their property, and in 1548 the commissioners in Somerset produced this survey and rental. The individuals named are the tenants whose rents provided the chantry's income: occasionally an incumbent is named. The survey was edited by Emanuel Green for the Somerset Record Society, and published in 1888.

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Tenants of Somerset chantries
 (1548)
Inhabitants of Kensington in Middlesex (1790-1797)
The provincial sections of the Universal British Directory include lists of gentry and traders from each town and the surrounding countryside, with names of local surgeons, lawyers, postmasters, carriers, &c. (the sample scan here is from the section for Hull). The directory started publication in 1791, but was not completed for some years, and the provincial lists, sent in by local agents, can date back as early as 1790 and as late as 1797.

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Inhabitants of Kensington in Middlesex
 (1790-1797)
Lincolnshire Cottagers: Bigby (1801)
Robert Gourlay published the results of a detailed survey that he had made in person travelling from village to village in Lincolnshire and Rutland, examining the state of the cottagers in each parish. After a general description of the local agriculture, he listed the cottagers by name, and, where possible, recorded the acreage of their holdings, annual rent, the number of persons in each family, and their stock, giving numbers of cows, pigs, horses &c.

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Lincolnshire Cottagers: Bigby
 (1801)
Insolvents (1828)
Insolvency notices for England and Wales: insolvency often caused people to restart their lives elsewhere, so these are an important source for lost links

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Insolvents
 (1828)
Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London (1834)
The public prints of December 1834 carried this loyal address to king William IV of merchants, bankers, shipowners, traders and others connected with the city of London, requesting 'permission at the present juncture to address your Majesty for the purpose of renewing the expression of our dutiful and loyal attachment to your Majesty’s person and crown. Deeply sensible of the practical blessings we have hitherto enjoyed under our wisely mixed constitution of King, Lords, and Commons, and feeling that the free and legitimate exercise of the Royal prerogative forms an integral part of that constitution (as essential to the maintenance of our own liberties as to the power and dignity of the Throne), we beg humbly to assure your Majesty of our determination steadfastly to uphold the same by every means in our power. 'Feeling, in common with all classes of your Majesty’s subjects, the deep importance of applying to all real abuses, wherever they may be found, a wholesome and timely correction, and of effecting in our excellent institutions every improvement of which careful examination and experience may prove them to be susceptible, we desire further dutifully to express our entire confidence that these useful purposes will ever occupy your Majesty’s paternal care. Nor can we permit ourselves to believe that the importance of these objects will be less apparent to those to whom the powers of government have been recently intrusted.' Full names are given (or surname with initials), and address. Over 5000 subscribed.

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Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London
 (1834)
Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk (1292-1836)
Lists of admissions of freemen of Lynn from the earliest surviving records to 1836 were published by the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society in 1913. These lists were extracted from the tallage rolls of 1291 to 1306; the Red Register of Lynn from 1342 to 1395; from the assembly rolls for the reigns of Henry IV and V [1399 to 1422]; from the hall books from 1423; and from a list of freemen starting in 1443 in the Book of Oaths (but itself abstracted from entries in the hall books). Freedom of the borough, necessary to practise a trade there, could be obtained by birth (in which case the father's name and occupation are usually given); by apprenticeship to a freeman (the master's name and occupation being given); by gratuity; or by purchase. Both the freemen and the masters listed are indexed here. The main abbreviations used are: B., freedom taken up by right of birth; A., freedom taken up by right of apprenticeship; G., freedom granted by order of assembly (gratuity); and P., freedom acquired by purchase.

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Tradesmen of Lynn in Norfolk
 (1292-1836)
North Lincolnshire Non-Voters: Barton Polling District (1852)
The Poll Book for North Lincolnshire (Lindsey) in the General Election of 1852 was prepared from the poll clerks' lists, and so is arranged polling district by polling district, and within those by township or parish, but with non-voters listed separately at the end of each polling district. The 9,620 voters are listed not by residence, but by the parish or township in which lay the property that gave the right to vote: consequently 260 electors appear twice on the register. 1,797 did not vote. Many of the electors lived outside the area, or even outside the county. The names are listed roughly alphabetically by surname, with christian name, residence and occupation: with a key to the nature of their property (freehold fr, rented rt, or copyhold ch), and for whom the votes were cast (CR.: Rt. Hon. R. A. Christopher, who received 5,585 votes; CH.: Sir Montague J. Cholmeley, 4,777; S.: James Banks Stanhope, 5,575). Each elector had two votes. The franchise comprised all adult males in possession of 40s freehold, or £10 copyhold or leasehold, annual value. At the end of each polling district is a list of electors who did not vote, many living at a distance from the area.

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North Lincolnshire Non-Voters: Barton Polling District
 (1852)
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